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A Flagging Model

The Economist
March 28, 2015

Higher education has two sets of customers: students and the government. Students want all sorts of things from it—to make friends, sharpen their minds and get away from home. But most of all they want it to improve their economic prospects. Governments want three things from higher education: research, human capital and equity.

Mix and Match

The Economist
March 28, 2015

In most European countries the state pays 80-100% of the costs of tuition. The main advantages of this model are equity and cost control. Where it works well—in northern Europe—graduate education levels are uniformly high. Where it works badly—in southern Europe—they are uniformly low. American uses mixed funding, with individuals paying most of the costs of tuition and the government helping out with loans and grants. In some countries with similar models, such as Japan and South Korea, individuals and families pick up the tab. These systems tend to be better funded and more expensive than the European ones (see chart 4) because people fork out readily, and costs are harder to control.

Colleges Depend on Greek Life. That’s Why It’s so Hard to Control.

Vox
March 27, 2015

Many college leaders seem sincerely appalled by the excesses of their students and determined to do something about it. But in many ways, college presidents' hands are tied. And this is what makes Greek life, even when it gets bad, so difficult to tame: colleges are just as dependent on fraternities as fraternities are on them.

Obama Administration College Ratings Won't Enhance Higher Education

New Orleans, La., Times-Picayune - Presidential Opinion
March 27, 2015

Norman C. Francis, president, Xavier University and Walter M. Kimbrough, president, Dillard University write: The importance of diversity is one of the reasons we are concerned about the Obama administration's plans to develop a system to rate our country's almost 3,000 four-year and almost 2,000 two-year colleges and universities. The plan is to divide nearly 5,000 unique institutions serving millions of students with differing needs and aspirations into just three categories, which undoubtedly will be labeled the best, the worst and all those in-between.

Many Teach Grants Turn Into Loans; Report Asks Department to Find Out Why

Chronicle of Higher Education
March 27, 2015

A third of the more than 112,000 students who have received federal Teach Grants have had their grants changed to loans, according to a report released on Thursday by the Government Accountability Office. Teach Grants, which provide prospective teachers with up to $4,000 a year, are converted to loans when recipients fail to meet the program’s service requirement: teaching for four years in a high-need subject in a low-income school.

Little Progress on Incentive Comp

Inside Higher Ed
March 27, 2015

The U.S. Education Department's Federal Student Aid office has done too little to carry out regulatory changes adopted five years ago to crack down on colleges' use of incentive compensation to reward employees, the department's inspector general said in a highly critical audit this week.

Why Colleges Don’t do More to Rein in Frats

Chronicle of Higher Education
March 27, 2015

It’s getting hard to keep up with the number of shocking incidents attributed to fraternities. But the latest spate of bad behavior has raised bigger questions about Greek organizations’ place on campuses: Why don’t colleges, or the national associations the fraternities represent, hold frats more accountable? Can they, or should they, do more? How?

Roosevelt University Names New President

Chicago Tribune
March 27, 2015

At a time when Roosevelt University faces financial uncertainty, it has named an accomplished fundraiser as its new president.
Ali Malekzadeh, who will take over as the Chicago school's sixth president July 1, is a 59-year-old Iranian-American who has been a business dean at private and public universities for 17 years, most recently at the College of Business Administration at Kansas State University since 2011.

Bloomfield College to Offer Flat-Rate Tuition

Bloomfield Life (NJ)
March 27, 2015

Bloomfield College is set to begin offering flat-rate tuition, a move it is hoped will minimize surprises and maximize transparency.  Still far from common in higher education, the pricing model would eliminate course fees for part-time students and the comprehensive fee; the latter was a $1,200 per year cost for full-time students.

'The Bare Minimum'

Inside Higher Ed
March 27, 2015

When Syracuse University last week announced the resignation of its athletics director and impending retirement of its revered basketball coach, the university's supporters and even some of its critics said the moves showed the university was finally owning up to the National Collegiate Athletic Association's allegations that Syracuse failed to properly monitor its basketball program for over a decade, leading to academic fraud, improper payment to athletes by a booster and failure to follow its own drug testing policies. But some faculty members and critics of big-time college sports aren't convinced the university is sufficiently punishing those who share the blame for the fraud.

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