Letters & Op-Eds

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College ranks and college angst

College ranks and college angst

August 21, 2007

The parent who uses only U.S. News & World Report's rankings to pick a college is as shortsighted as the admissions officer who selects students based solely on test scores.
The parent who uses only U.S. News & World Report's rankings to pick a college is as shortsighted as the admissions officer who selects students based solely on test scores.

August 21, 2007

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Use college rankings with a grain of salt

Use college rankings with a grain of salt

August 20, 2007

Statistics are easily manipulated and can be used to produce a pre- determined outcome. It is no wonder that many college presidents and educators are refusing to participate in the U.S. News & World Report's annual college ranking survey.
Statistics are easily manipulated and can be used to produce a pre- determined outcome. It is no wonder that many college presidents and educators are refusing to participate in the U.S. News & World Report's annual college ranking survey.

August 20, 2007

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Letter Printed in Forbes

Letter Printed in Forbes

January 29, 2007

Letters to the Editor

Re: Op-Ed, "School for Scandal," Dec. 25 (College cost drivers)

Empirical evidence refutes A. Gary Shilling's claim in "School for Scandal" (Dec. 25, 2006) that increasing funding for federal student aid would fuel tuition growth. Two U.S. Department of Education studies have shown that there are no associations between federal grants, state grants, student loans and changes in tuition, and that there is "little evidence" to show that federal student aid increases have contributed to tuition inflation.

Congress has not kept funding for student aid in line with inflation, family need or the wave of low-income and first-generation college students. The maximum Pell Grant contribution hasn't increased in five years. Average net tuition (published price minus grants and tax benefits) at private colleges and universities is $13,200--more than 40% below the average published tuition. There's only so much more that private institutions can do. It's time for Congress to hold up its end of the social compact that has made college possible for millions of students over the last 40 years.

Sincerely, 

David L. Warren
President
National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities

 

Letters to the Editor

Re: Op-Ed, "School for Scandal," Dec. 25 (College cost drivers)

Empirical evidence refutes A. Gary Shilling's claim in "School for Scandal" (Dec. 25, 2006) that increasing funding for federal student aid would fuel tuition growth. Two U.S. Department of Education studies have shown that there are no associations between federal grants, state grants, student loans and changes in tuition, and that there is "little evidence" to show that federal student aid increases have contributed to tuition inflation.

Congress has not kept funding for student aid in line with inflation, family need or the wave of low-income and first-generation college students. The maximum Pell Grant contribution hasn't increased in five years. Average net tuition (published price minus grants and tax benefits) at private colleges and universities is $13,200--more than 40% below the average published tuition. There's only so much more that private institutions can do. It's time for Congress to hold up its end of the social compact that has made college possible for millions of students over the last 40 years.

Sincerely, 

David L. Warren
President
National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities

 

January 29, 2007

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Letter Printed in the San Francisco Chronicle

Letter Printed in the San Francisco Chronicle

December 23, 2006

Letters to the Editor

Re: "Controlling college costs"

Leslie Carbone (Open Forum, Dec. 12) offers the perfect prescription for making American higher education unaffordable and inaccessible -- by cutting the federal student aid programs. Every piece of existing empirical evidence refutes her claim that federal student aid feeds college tuition increases. Two U.S. Department of Education studies have shown that there are "no associations between ... federal grants, state grants, and student loans, and changes in tuition," and "there is little evidence ... that federal student aid increases have contributed to tuition inflation." The erosion of federal student aid in the past five years has become an additional strain on college budgets as institutions attempt to fill the gap. Congress has not kept funding for student aid in line with inflation, growing family need, or the wave of low-income and first-generation college students who are academically prepared for college. Federal student aid has made college possible for students from all backgrounds for 40 years. Add a federal disinvestment in student aid to rising institutional cost pressures and growing student need, and you've created a recipe for financial disaster for students and their families.

Sincerely, 

David L. Warren
President
National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities

Letters to the Editor

Re: "Controlling college costs"

Leslie Carbone (Open Forum, Dec. 12) offers the perfect prescription for making American higher education unaffordable and inaccessible -- by cutting the federal student aid programs. Every piece of existing empirical evidence refutes her claim that federal student aid feeds college tuition increases. Two U.S. Department of Education studies have shown that there are "no associations between ... federal grants, state grants, and student loans, and changes in tuition," and "there is little evidence ... that federal student aid increases have contributed to tuition inflation." The erosion of federal student aid in the past five years has become an additional strain on college budgets as institutions attempt to fill the gap. Congress has not kept funding for student aid in line with inflation, growing family need, or the wave of low-income and first-generation college students who are academically prepared for college. Federal student aid has made college possible for students from all backgrounds for 40 years. Add a federal disinvestment in student aid to rising institutional cost pressures and growing student need, and you've created a recipe for financial disaster for students and their families.

Sincerely, 

David L. Warren
President
National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities

December 23, 2006

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Letter Printed in the Washington Times

Letter Printed in the Washington Times

December 21, 2006

Letters to the Editor

Re: "Controlling college costs"

Leslie Carbone offers the perfect prescription for making American higher education unaffordable and inaccessible — that is, by cutting federal student aid programs ("Controlling college costs," Commentary, Dec. 10). Every piece of existing empirical evidence refutes her claim that federal student aid feeds college tuition increases.

Two U.S. Department of Education studies have shown that there are "no associations between federal grants, state grants, and student loans, and changes in tuition," and "there is little evidence that federal student aid increases have contributed to tuition inflation."

The erosion of federal student aid in the past five years has become an additional strain on college budgets as institutions attempt to fill the gap. Congress has not kept funding for student aid in line with inflation, growing family need or the wave of low-income and first-generation college students who are academically prepared for college. Federal student aid has made college possible for students from all backgrounds for 40 years. Add a federal deinvestment in student aid to rising institutional cost pressures and growing student need, and you've created a recipe for financial disaster for students and their families.

Sincerely, 

David L. Warren
President
National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities

 

Letters to the Editor

Re: "Controlling college costs"

Leslie Carbone offers the perfect prescription for making American higher education unaffordable and inaccessible — that is, by cutting federal student aid programs ("Controlling college costs," Commentary, Dec. 10). Every piece of existing empirical evidence refutes her claim that federal student aid feeds college tuition increases.

Two U.S. Department of Education studies have shown that there are "no associations between federal grants, state grants, and student loans, and changes in tuition," and "there is little evidence that federal student aid increases have contributed to tuition inflation."

The erosion of federal student aid in the past five years has become an additional strain on college budgets as institutions attempt to fill the gap. Congress has not kept funding for student aid in line with inflation, growing family need or the wave of low-income and first-generation college students who are academically prepared for college. Federal student aid has made college possible for students from all backgrounds for 40 years. Add a federal deinvestment in student aid to rising institutional cost pressures and growing student need, and you've created a recipe for financial disaster for students and their families.

Sincerely, 

David L. Warren
President
National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities

 

December 21, 2006

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About the items posted on the NAICU site: News items, features, and opinion pieces posted on this site from sources outside NAICU do not necessarily reflect the position of the association or its members. Rather, this content reflects the diversity of issues and views that are shaping American higher education.

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