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Private Colleges Innovate to Combat Sticker Shock

Private Colleges Innovate to Combat Sticker Shock

December 14, 2007

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF INDEPENDENT COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                    CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu

                                                     office: 202-739-0474     cell: 202-288-9333 

WASHINGTON, D.C., Dec. 14-In this season of giving, students and families are receiving welcome news from private colleges across the nation, which could save them thousands of dollars a year in college costs. 

New initiatives unveiled this week by Harvard, Cal Tech, Pomona, Swarthmore, and Duke will replace loans with grants in student aid packages.  Harvard also will cap expected family contributions at zero to 10 percent of listed tuition for families earning up to $180,000 a year. 

California Lutheran University announced that it will begin matching the public college tuition for students who are also admitted to the University of California, Los Angeles, or University of California, Santa Barbara.  Yale is expected to announce major changes to its aid policies in January.

[The NAICU web site has a complete rundown of schools that have eliminated loans and made other significant changes to their need-analysis formulas since Princeton started doing away with loans in 1998.  Other types of affordability and cost-cutting initiatives also are listed.  Go to www.naicu.edu/affordabilityinitiatives.]

This flurry of activity is described by higher education experts as a major acceleration in what has become a growing trend in recent years. 

Consumer concern about rising tuitions, exacerbated by family incomes that have steadily lost ground to the Consumer Price Index over the past decade, is the force behind colleges' efforts, according to David L. Warren, president of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities. 

"The marketplace is telling us that it's time to act even more aggressively on affordability, and we are," Warren said.  "Institutions across the board will continue to accelerate their efforts to enhance access and affordability, within their financial means, and to better control their operating costs."

Families worried about sinking deeper into debt or dipping into retirement savings to cover tuition at a school without a large endowment-and such colleges make up a significant majority of the nation's private institutions-should note that other affordability strategies are emerging on campuses around the nation. 

These include, but aren't limited to, tuition cuts and freezes; tuition that's guaranteed not to increase while a student is enrolled; accelerated degree programs that let a student earn a four-year degree in three years, saving on tuition; colleges that pick up the interest on loans taken out by parents; and even some private institutions that charge no tuition.  Berea College, a "work college" in Kentucky, for instance, hasn't charged tuition since 1892.

NAICU's web site (www.naicu.edu/affordabilityinitiatives) gives succinct institutional examples organized by type of strategy.  They include: 

  • Reducing loans with grants, and changing need-analysis formulas
  • Tuition cuts, freezes, and guarantees
  • Tuition and student aid matches
  • Eliminating loan interest
  • Partnerships with community colleges and high schools
  • Accelerated degree programs
  • Four-year graduation and job guarantees
  • Work colleges

The site also lists examples of colleges that are changing the way they do business to enhance operating efficiency and cut the costs associated with educating a student, while maintaining academic quality.  Strategies include: 

  • Outsourcing and administrative streamlining
  • Integration of information technology
  • Employee cost-cutting incentives
  • Going green
  • Student employment initiatives
  • Consortial arrangements at the metropolitan, regional, state, and national levels
  • Increasing non-tuition revenue streams

"Every private college president in the nation understands the financial challenges many students and families face," Warren said.  "Staying affordable and accessible is at the center of their institutions' missions.  I am confident they will succeed."

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education.  With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions.  They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions. 

###

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF INDEPENDENT COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                    CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu

                                                     office: 202-739-0474     cell: 202-288-9333 

WASHINGTON, D.C., Dec. 14-In this season of giving, students and families are receiving welcome news from private colleges across the nation, which could save them thousands of dollars a year in college costs. 

New initiatives unveiled this week by Harvard, Cal Tech, Pomona, Swarthmore, and Duke will replace loans with grants in student aid packages.  Harvard also will cap expected family contributions at zero to 10 percent of listed tuition for families earning up to $180,000 a year. 

California Lutheran University announced that it will begin matching the public college tuition for students who are also admitted to the University of California, Los Angeles, or University of California, Santa Barbara.  Yale is expected to announce major changes to its aid policies in January.

[The NAICU web site has a complete rundown of schools that have eliminated loans and made other significant changes to their need-analysis formulas since Princeton started doing away with loans in 1998.  Other types of affordability and cost-cutting initiatives also are listed.  Go to www.naicu.edu/affordabilityinitiatives.]

This flurry of activity is described by higher education experts as a major acceleration in what has become a growing trend in recent years. 

Consumer concern about rising tuitions, exacerbated by family incomes that have steadily lost ground to the Consumer Price Index over the past decade, is the force behind colleges' efforts, according to David L. Warren, president of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities. 

"The marketplace is telling us that it's time to act even more aggressively on affordability, and we are," Warren said.  "Institutions across the board will continue to accelerate their efforts to enhance access and affordability, within their financial means, and to better control their operating costs."

Families worried about sinking deeper into debt or dipping into retirement savings to cover tuition at a school without a large endowment-and such colleges make up a significant majority of the nation's private institutions-should note that other affordability strategies are emerging on campuses around the nation. 

These include, but aren't limited to, tuition cuts and freezes; tuition that's guaranteed not to increase while a student is enrolled; accelerated degree programs that let a student earn a four-year degree in three years, saving on tuition; colleges that pick up the interest on loans taken out by parents; and even some private institutions that charge no tuition.  Berea College, a "work college" in Kentucky, for instance, hasn't charged tuition since 1892.

NAICU's web site (www.naicu.edu/affordabilityinitiatives) gives succinct institutional examples organized by type of strategy.  They include: 

  • Reducing loans with grants, and changing need-analysis formulas
  • Tuition cuts, freezes, and guarantees
  • Tuition and student aid matches
  • Eliminating loan interest
  • Partnerships with community colleges and high schools
  • Accelerated degree programs
  • Four-year graduation and job guarantees
  • Work colleges

The site also lists examples of colleges that are changing the way they do business to enhance operating efficiency and cut the costs associated with educating a student, while maintaining academic quality.  Strategies include: 

  • Outsourcing and administrative streamlining
  • Integration of information technology
  • Employee cost-cutting incentives
  • Going green
  • Student employment initiatives
  • Consortial arrangements at the metropolitan, regional, state, and national levels
  • Increasing non-tuition revenue streams

"Every private college president in the nation understands the financial challenges many students and families face," Warren said.  "Staying affordable and accessible is at the center of their institutions' missions.  I am confident they will succeed."

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education.  With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions.  They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions. 

###

December 14, 2007

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Statement by NAICU President David L. Warren on the 2007 College Board Tuition and Student Aid Reports

Statement by NAICU President David L. Warren on the 2007 College Bo...

October 22, 2007

EMBARGOED UNTIL                                               CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu

11 a.m. Eastern, October 22, 2007                    202-739-0474 (office)     202-288-9333 (cell)

 

____________________________________________________________________________

Highlights

  • 6.3 Percent Increase in Tuition and Fees at Private Colleges Matches Last Year's Rise
  • Grant Aid Provided by Private Institutions Grows by 7.8 Percent Over Previous Year
  • Average Net Tuition 40 Percent Lower than Published Price -- $14,400 vs. $23,712
  • Cost Drivers Include Energy, Health Care and Other Insurance, Growing Family Need
  • Five-Year Increase at Private Colleges Lowest Since 1982

____________________________________________________________________________

 

The College Board reports not only underscore the challenges that families face in affording higher education, but point to the efforts of private colleges and universities to remain affordable and accessible. 

This year's average increase in private-college tuition and fees matches last year's rate of 6.3 percent.  Grant aid provided by private college and universities to undergraduates was an estimated $13.8 billion in 2006-07, an increase of 7.8 percent from the previous year. 

Because of our commitment to providing a quality education at the lowest possible out-of-pocket cost, this year's average net tuition (published price minus grants and tax benefits) for a student at a private college is 40 percent below the average published tuition -- $14,400 vs. $23,712.  Our investment in grant aid has been substantial.  Students at private colleges today receive nearly five times as much aid from their institutions as from the federal government.  In 1985, that ratio was one to one.

This year's average tuition increase reflects significant increases in the cost of energy, library acquisitions, health care and other insurance premiums, and growing family financial need.  While Congress has increased student aid funding in recent years, much more needs to be done to make up for several years of stagnant funding, growing family need, and the swelling tidal wave of low-income and first-generation college students who are academically prepared for college.  

In recent years, private colleges and universities have taken innovative steps to control costs and to keep tuition increases as low as possible, while ensuring that students have access to small classes; top-notch instructors; and up-to-date learning facilities, information technology, and lab equipment.  Examples can be found at www.naicu.edu/affordabilityinitiatives.

As a result of our cost cutting initiatives, the 14-percent inflation-adjusted increase in published tuition and fees at four-year private institutions in the last five-year period is the lowest since 1982. 

Private college and university presidents understand the financial pressures facing students and their parents.  Working in partnership with federal and state governments, philanthropic organizations, and families themselves, we will continue to make access and affordability for students from all backgrounds priority one.

### 

EMBARGOED UNTIL                                               CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu

11 a.m. Eastern, October 22, 2007                    202-739-0474 (office)     202-288-9333 (cell)

 

____________________________________________________________________________

Highlights

  • 6.3 Percent Increase in Tuition and Fees at Private Colleges Matches Last Year's Rise
  • Grant Aid Provided by Private Institutions Grows by 7.8 Percent Over Previous Year
  • Average Net Tuition 40 Percent Lower than Published Price -- $14,400 vs. $23,712
  • Cost Drivers Include Energy, Health Care and Other Insurance, Growing Family Need
  • Five-Year Increase at Private Colleges Lowest Since 1982

____________________________________________________________________________

 

The College Board reports not only underscore the challenges that families face in affording higher education, but point to the efforts of private colleges and universities to remain affordable and accessible. 

This year's average increase in private-college tuition and fees matches last year's rate of 6.3 percent.  Grant aid provided by private college and universities to undergraduates was an estimated $13.8 billion in 2006-07, an increase of 7.8 percent from the previous year. 

Because of our commitment to providing a quality education at the lowest possible out-of-pocket cost, this year's average net tuition (published price minus grants and tax benefits) for a student at a private college is 40 percent below the average published tuition -- $14,400 vs. $23,712.  Our investment in grant aid has been substantial.  Students at private colleges today receive nearly five times as much aid from their institutions as from the federal government.  In 1985, that ratio was one to one.

This year's average tuition increase reflects significant increases in the cost of energy, library acquisitions, health care and other insurance premiums, and growing family financial need.  While Congress has increased student aid funding in recent years, much more needs to be done to make up for several years of stagnant funding, growing family need, and the swelling tidal wave of low-income and first-generation college students who are academically prepared for college.  

In recent years, private colleges and universities have taken innovative steps to control costs and to keep tuition increases as low as possible, while ensuring that students have access to small classes; top-notch instructors; and up-to-date learning facilities, information technology, and lab equipment.  Examples can be found at www.naicu.edu/affordabilityinitiatives.

As a result of our cost cutting initiatives, the 14-percent inflation-adjusted increase in published tuition and fees at four-year private institutions in the last five-year period is the lowest since 1982. 

Private college and university presidents understand the financial pressures facing students and their parents.  Working in partnership with federal and state governments, philanthropic organizations, and families themselves, we will continue to make access and affordability for students from all backgrounds priority one.

### 

October 22, 2007

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First-of-Its-Kind College Consumer Information Web Site Debuts

First-of-Its-Kind College Consumer Information Web Site Debuts

September 27, 2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 26, 2007

CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu
office: (202) 739-0474 cell: (202) 288-9333

First-of-Its-Kind College Consumer Information Web Site Debuts

Washington, DC - Potential college students and their parents have gained a new and distinctive resource for exploring and comparing private colleges and universities. U-CAN-or the University & College Accountability Network-was unveiled at a news conference today by the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU), the largest organization representing nonprofit, private institutions in the United States.

U-CAN is the first national consumer information resource created and provided directly to students and parents by colleges and universities themselves. Over 600 private colleges and universities have signed on to participate in the initiative, with over 440 profiles published so far. Another 150 profiles are expected to be published within the week.

"We are very excited about the launch of U-CAN," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "There are many consumer sources out there, but U-CAN offers something distinct.

"The college profiles provide a unique mix of 47 quantitative elements, narrative descriptions, and 25 hyperlinks to campus web sites," Warren said. "Institutions not only report cut-and-dry statistics, but also have the opportunity to express what makes them special."

About U-CAN
The U-CAN consumer information initiative is designed to give, in a common format, prospective students and their families concise, Web-based consumer-friendly information on individual private colleges and universities. U-CAN consists of hundreds of institutional profiles that contain comparable data and targeted links to the institution's Web site for information on specific aspects of the institution. The profiles are displayed in a common template that NAICU developed.

Through focus groups conducted in cities across the nation, prospective students and parents from all backgrounds identified the information they most need to make an informed college choice. Their comments shaped the format and content of the U-CAN site. U-CAN is totally free both to users and to the colleges and universities that choose to participate.

U-CAN profiles also include information identified by policy-makers as important for institutional accountability. Congress and the U.S. Department of Education have called for comparable, concise, relevant, and easily accessible information to help the public better evaluate and choose colleges.

The in-depth information included in the college and university profiles covers admissions, enrollment, academics, student demographics, graduation rates, most common fields of study, transfer of credit policy, accreditation, faculty information, class size, tuition and fee trends, price of attendance, financial aid, campus housing, student life, and campus safety. U-CAN will give consumers easy access to information on average loans at graduation, undergraduate class-size breakdown, and net tuition for hundreds of colleges. This information, which comes from the U.S. Department of Education's IPEDS survey and the Common Data Set, is often difficult for consumers to find and decipher.

The institutional profiles also are highly "clickable." Twenty-five targeted hyperlinks take students to specific pages of an institution's Web site. The links and narrative descriptions complement the profile's statistical data, and provide an opportunity to see what makes each college or university unique.

By the time the U-CAN web site goes live on September 26, 2007, more than 600 private colleges and universities will have signed up. NAICU is at the beginning stages of the site. U-CAN will continue to grow and improve as institutions work to enhance their profiles and NAICU responds to feedback from the public.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.
For more information, visit www.ucan-network.org/mediakit.

                                                                 ###

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 26, 2007

CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu
office: (202) 739-0474 cell: (202) 288-9333

First-of-Its-Kind College Consumer Information Web Site Debuts

Washington, DC - Potential college students and their parents have gained a new and distinctive resource for exploring and comparing private colleges and universities. U-CAN-or the University & College Accountability Network-was unveiled at a news conference today by the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU), the largest organization representing nonprofit, private institutions in the United States.

U-CAN is the first national consumer information resource created and provided directly to students and parents by colleges and universities themselves. Over 600 private colleges and universities have signed on to participate in the initiative, with over 440 profiles published so far. Another 150 profiles are expected to be published within the week.

"We are very excited about the launch of U-CAN," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "There are many consumer sources out there, but U-CAN offers something distinct.

"The college profiles provide a unique mix of 47 quantitative elements, narrative descriptions, and 25 hyperlinks to campus web sites," Warren said. "Institutions not only report cut-and-dry statistics, but also have the opportunity to express what makes them special."

About U-CAN
The U-CAN consumer information initiative is designed to give, in a common format, prospective students and their families concise, Web-based consumer-friendly information on individual private colleges and universities. U-CAN consists of hundreds of institutional profiles that contain comparable data and targeted links to the institution's Web site for information on specific aspects of the institution. The profiles are displayed in a common template that NAICU developed.

Through focus groups conducted in cities across the nation, prospective students and parents from all backgrounds identified the information they most need to make an informed college choice. Their comments shaped the format and content of the U-CAN site. U-CAN is totally free both to users and to the colleges and universities that choose to participate.

U-CAN profiles also include information identified by policy-makers as important for institutional accountability. Congress and the U.S. Department of Education have called for comparable, concise, relevant, and easily accessible information to help the public better evaluate and choose colleges.

The in-depth information included in the college and university profiles covers admissions, enrollment, academics, student demographics, graduation rates, most common fields of study, transfer of credit policy, accreditation, faculty information, class size, tuition and fee trends, price of attendance, financial aid, campus housing, student life, and campus safety. U-CAN will give consumers easy access to information on average loans at graduation, undergraduate class-size breakdown, and net tuition for hundreds of colleges. This information, which comes from the U.S. Department of Education's IPEDS survey and the Common Data Set, is often difficult for consumers to find and decipher.

The institutional profiles also are highly "clickable." Twenty-five targeted hyperlinks take students to specific pages of an institution's Web site. The links and narrative descriptions complement the profile's statistical data, and provide an opportunity to see what makes each college or university unique.

By the time the U-CAN web site goes live on September 26, 2007, more than 600 private colleges and universities will have signed up. NAICU is at the beginning stages of the site. U-CAN will continue to grow and improve as institutions work to enhance their profiles and NAICU responds to feedback from the public.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.
For more information, visit www.ucan-network.org/mediakit.

                                                                 ###

September 27, 2007

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NAICU President David Warren Comments on Amherst College's Decision to Eliminate Student Loans

NAICU President David Warren Comments on Amherst College's Decision...

July 20, 2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 20, 2007

CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu
office: (202) 739-0474 cell: (202) 288-9333

Statement by David L. Warren, President,
National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
on Amherst College's Elimination of Student Loans

July 20, 2007

Amherst College's decision to replace all loans with grants is a bold move that will help ensure access to an affordable, world-class education for students of modest means. It speaks forcefully about Amherst's deep commitment to educational equality.

The announcement will undoubtedly grab the attention of every president and board of directors in the nation, as they wrestle with how to keep their institutions accessible to an increasingly needy student population. While few of America's 1,500 private colleges and universities have the financial resources to follow Amherst's extraordinary example, the move adds kindling to the robust national conversation on these issues.

Amherst's decision not only follows similar moves by Princeton University and Davidson College, but is a dramatic example of the quiet revolution underway at the nation's private colleges and universities. In recent years, independent institutions have redoubled their efforts to ensure that student out-of-pocket costs remain as low as possible.

As individual institutional financial constraints allow, private colleges and universities are adopting enterprising approaches that are as diverse as private higher education itself. These innovative initiatives include cutting or freezing tuition, guaranteeing incoming students a four-year lock on tuition, reducing expected student and family contributions, eliminating loans for low-income students, and others.

Examples of institutional affordability initiatives are available on the NAICU web site at http://www.naicu.edu/docLib/20070720_enhancing_affordability_07-07.pdf.

The online compilation also lists examples of how private colleges and universities are taking a page from the business world to control underlying costs and enhance operating efficiency. Initiatives include, but are not limited to, streamlining administration; outsourcing services; green-friendly construction and retrofitting; employee incentives to cut costs; and metropolitan, state, and national purchasing and academic consortia.

The actions of Amherst represent in a dramatic way the responsibility our institutions feel to use resources judiciously to best serve students. They are committed to enhancing access and affordability, and providing the best education possible for students from all backgrounds.

###

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 20, 2007

CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu
office: (202) 739-0474 cell: (202) 288-9333

Statement by David L. Warren, President,
National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
on Amherst College's Elimination of Student Loans

July 20, 2007

Amherst College's decision to replace all loans with grants is a bold move that will help ensure access to an affordable, world-class education for students of modest means. It speaks forcefully about Amherst's deep commitment to educational equality.

The announcement will undoubtedly grab the attention of every president and board of directors in the nation, as they wrestle with how to keep their institutions accessible to an increasingly needy student population. While few of America's 1,500 private colleges and universities have the financial resources to follow Amherst's extraordinary example, the move adds kindling to the robust national conversation on these issues.

Amherst's decision not only follows similar moves by Princeton University and Davidson College, but is a dramatic example of the quiet revolution underway at the nation's private colleges and universities. In recent years, independent institutions have redoubled their efforts to ensure that student out-of-pocket costs remain as low as possible.

As individual institutional financial constraints allow, private colleges and universities are adopting enterprising approaches that are as diverse as private higher education itself. These innovative initiatives include cutting or freezing tuition, guaranteeing incoming students a four-year lock on tuition, reducing expected student and family contributions, eliminating loans for low-income students, and others.

Examples of institutional affordability initiatives are available on the NAICU web site at http://www.naicu.edu/docLib/20070720_enhancing_affordability_07-07.pdf.

The online compilation also lists examples of how private colleges and universities are taking a page from the business world to control underlying costs and enhance operating efficiency. Initiatives include, but are not limited to, streamlining administration; outsourcing services; green-friendly construction and retrofitting; employee incentives to cut costs; and metropolitan, state, and national purchasing and academic consortia.

The actions of Amherst represent in a dramatic way the responsibility our institutions feel to use resources judiciously to best serve students. They are committed to enhancing access and affordability, and providing the best education possible for students from all backgrounds.

###

July 20, 2007

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Charitable IRA Rollover Generates $70 Million in Donations at Private Colleges and Universities, in Its First Five Months

Charitable IRA Rollover Generates $70 Million in Donations at Priva...

April 12, 2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                    CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu
April 12, 2007                                    office: 202-739-0474     cell: 202-288-9333
 
WASHINGTON, DC, April 12 - New survey results from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities show that the IRA charitable rollover has had a significant impact on philanthropic giving at private institutions. 
 
The temporary federal tax provision, which was approved by Congress for the first time in August 2006, generated more than $70 million in new contributions in its first five months of existence.  IRA rollover gifts were reported by 70 percent of the responding colleges and universities, with an average of 10 gifts per institution. 
 
Nearly two-thirds of respondents designate using funds for student financial aid.  Other categories of use include, but are not limited to, annual funds, academic programs, loan repayment assistance, travel funds for study-abroad students, graduate fellowships, and faculty salaries.
 
The rollover allows individuals age 70-1/2 and older to withdraw funds from either a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA, and make direct gifts to any public charity.  Current law requires individuals to start withdrawing IRA funds at this age.  The rollover provision allows excess funds not necessary for retirement purposes to be donated to charities, including colleges and universities.  Gifts are limited to $100,000 per person, per year. 
 
Without congressional action, the provision will expire on December 31, 2007. 
 
Eighty-four percent of respondents believe there is a definite potential for increased giving with an expansion and extension of the IRA rollover.  Many development offices report that they have donors interested in continuing making gifts beyond 2007 as a result of the rollover.
 
Most of the college officials responding believe that making three changes to the provision will further increase giving:
 
* Allowing gifts at a lower age limit (71 percent of respondents)
* Expanding the rollover to allow indirect gifts (65 percent of respondents)
* Removing the cap on the amount that could be given (58 percent of respondents)
 
"Ultimately, it is students who benefit from the IRA rollover," said NAICU president David L. Warren. "The new revenue it generates is proving to be a reliable funding source for new institutional grant aid.  It is also improving the overall quality of the academic experience.
 
"Congress needs to extend or make permanent the successful rollover in order to keep these philanthropic gifts flowing and benefiting students," Warren added.
 
NAICU conducted the IRA rollover survey from January to March 2007, with 690 private non-for-profit institutions responding.
 
NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education.  With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions.  They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions. 

###
 
What Colleges Are Saying about the Charitable IRA Rollover
 
Carroll College
Helena, Montana
$101,000 in IRA rollover gifts (August 2006 - January 2007)

"There is great potential for additional gifts through the charitable rollover.  We have received numerous inquiries, several new donations, and additional pledges for this year.  I am convinced that with enough time to turn donor interest into action, we would further benefit." 

- Richard Ortega, vice president for advancement, Carroll College
 
Texas Christian University
Fort Worth, Texas
$229,835 in IRA rollover gifts (August 2006 - January 2007)

"TCU received $229,835 in new gifts as a result of IRA rollover.  The funds were directed to scholarships, capital projects, and more.  We consider the rollover to be a major incentive in our overall planned giving and fund raising program. And we expect that it will be even more productive for us in the future."
 
- Victor Boschini, chancellor, Texas Christian University
 
Wartburg College
Waverly, Iowa
$203,031 in IRA rollover gifts (August 2006 - January 2007)

"Educating donors and the college's advancement professionals was an important component in our initial marketing plan regarding the IRA rollover.  As our donors and staff become more familiar and comfortable with the process, we feel the potential for new gifts will continue to grow. Consequently, we encourage Congress to continue the rollover option, which will significantly impact students in positive ways."
 
- Jack Ohle, president, Wartburg College
 
 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                    CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu
April 12, 2007                                    office: 202-739-0474     cell: 202-288-9333
 
WASHINGTON, DC, April 12 - New survey results from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities show that the IRA charitable rollover has had a significant impact on philanthropic giving at private institutions. 
 
The temporary federal tax provision, which was approved by Congress for the first time in August 2006, generated more than $70 million in new contributions in its first five months of existence.  IRA rollover gifts were reported by 70 percent of the responding colleges and universities, with an average of 10 gifts per institution. 
 
Nearly two-thirds of respondents designate using funds for student financial aid.  Other categories of use include, but are not limited to, annual funds, academic programs, loan repayment assistance, travel funds for study-abroad students, graduate fellowships, and faculty salaries.
 
The rollover allows individuals age 70-1/2 and older to withdraw funds from either a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA, and make direct gifts to any public charity.  Current law requires individuals to start withdrawing IRA funds at this age.  The rollover provision allows excess funds not necessary for retirement purposes to be donated to charities, including colleges and universities.  Gifts are limited to $100,000 per person, per year. 
 
Without congressional action, the provision will expire on December 31, 2007. 
 
Eighty-four percent of respondents believe there is a definite potential for increased giving with an expansion and extension of the IRA rollover.  Many development offices report that they have donors interested in continuing making gifts beyond 2007 as a result of the rollover.
 
Most of the college officials responding believe that making three changes to the provision will further increase giving:
 
* Allowing gifts at a lower age limit (71 percent of respondents)
* Expanding the rollover to allow indirect gifts (65 percent of respondents)
* Removing the cap on the amount that could be given (58 percent of respondents)
 
"Ultimately, it is students who benefit from the IRA rollover," said NAICU president David L. Warren. "The new revenue it generates is proving to be a reliable funding source for new institutional grant aid.  It is also improving the overall quality of the academic experience.
 
"Congress needs to extend or make permanent the successful rollover in order to keep these philanthropic gifts flowing and benefiting students," Warren added.
 
NAICU conducted the IRA rollover survey from January to March 2007, with 690 private non-for-profit institutions responding.
 
NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education.  With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions.  They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions. 

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What Colleges Are Saying about the Charitable IRA Rollover
 
Carroll College
Helena, Montana
$101,000 in IRA rollover gifts (August 2006 - January 2007)

"There is great potential for additional gifts through the charitable rollover.  We have received numerous inquiries, several new donations, and additional pledges for this year.  I am convinced that with enough time to turn donor interest into action, we would further benefit." 

- Richard Ortega, vice president for advancement, Carroll College
 
Texas Christian University
Fort Worth, Texas
$229,835 in IRA rollover gifts (August 2006 - January 2007)

"TCU received $229,835 in new gifts as a result of IRA rollover.  The funds were directed to scholarships, capital projects, and more.  We consider the rollover to be a major incentive in our overall planned giving and fund raising program. And we expect that it will be even more productive for us in the future."
 
- Victor Boschini, chancellor, Texas Christian University
 
Wartburg College
Waverly, Iowa
$203,031 in IRA rollover gifts (August 2006 - January 2007)

"Educating donors and the college's advancement professionals was an important component in our initial marketing plan regarding the IRA rollover.  As our donors and staff become more familiar and comfortable with the process, we feel the potential for new gifts will continue to grow. Consequently, we encourage Congress to continue the rollover option, which will significantly impact students in positive ways."
 
- Jack Ohle, president, Wartburg College
 
 

April 12, 2007

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About the items posted on the NAICU site: News items, features, and opinion pieces posted on this site from sources outside NAICU do not necessarily reflect the position of the association or its members. Rather, this content reflects the diversity of issues and views that are shaping American higher education.

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