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Round-up: Harvard Admissions Chief Defends Policies During First Day of Trial

Round-up: Harvard Admissions Chief Defends Policies During First Da...

October 16, 2018

Harvard University’s dean of admissions testified in federal court on Monday that in the interest of attracting a diverse student body, the school lowers its recruiting standards a bit for many students from rural regions — but not if they are Asian-American, according to reporting by The New York Times.
 
The dean, William Fitzsimmons, was the first witness to take the stand in a trial over whether Harvard discriminates against Asian-American applicants in violation of civil rights law. The plaintiffs in the case say Harvard effectively imposes a quota on Asian-American students, a claim the school denies.
 
After opening arguments in the morning, the trial began delving into the arcane mechanics of Harvard’s admissions process, which the university says is meant to ensure that students from a wide range of backgrounds are admitted. One issue that surfaced quickly was how Harvard goes about recruiting from what it calls “sparse country” — predominantly rural states that tend to yield few applications.
 
The following articles summarize the courtroom events on the first day of the trial:
 
Harvard Admissions Chief Defends Policies in First Day of Trial
The Wall Street Journal
 
Harvard Admissions Dean Testifies as Affirmative Action Trial Begins
The New York Times
 
Harvard Admissions Trial Opens with University Accused of Bias Against Asian Americans
The Washington Post
 
As Trial Begins, Harvard’s Admissions Are Under Scrutiny
The Boston Globe
 
Harvard Admissions Trial Opens With Arguments Focused on Diversity
The Chronicle of Higher Education
 
Harvard Trial Continues in Boston
Politico
 
What Hillsdale Can Teach Harvard – Column
The Wall Street Journal

 
Harvard University’s dean of admissions testified in federal court on Monday that in the interest of attracting a diverse student body, the school lowers its recruiting standards a bit for many students from rural regions — but not if they are Asian-American, according to reporting by The New York Times.
 
The dean, William Fitzsimmons, was the first witness to take the stand in a trial over whether Harvard discriminates against Asian-American applicants in violation of civil rights law. The plaintiffs in the case say Harvard effectively imposes a quota on Asian-American students, a claim the school denies.
 
After opening arguments in the morning, the trial began delving into the arcane mechanics of Harvard’s admissions process, which the university says is meant to ensure that students from a wide range of backgrounds are admitted. One issue that surfaced quickly was how Harvard goes about recruiting from what it calls “sparse country” — predominantly rural states that tend to yield few applications.
 
The following articles summarize the courtroom events on the first day of the trial:
 
Harvard Admissions Chief Defends Policies in First Day of Trial
The Wall Street Journal
 
Harvard Admissions Dean Testifies as Affirmative Action Trial Begins
The New York Times
 
Harvard Admissions Trial Opens with University Accused of Bias Against Asian Americans
The Washington Post
 
As Trial Begins, Harvard’s Admissions Are Under Scrutiny
The Boston Globe
 
Harvard Admissions Trial Opens With Arguments Focused on Diversity
The Chronicle of Higher Education
 
Harvard Trial Continues in Boston
Politico
 
What Hillsdale Can Teach Harvard – Column
The Wall Street Journal

 

October 16, 2018

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Forbes

Can the U.S. Government Fix College Financing? - Opinion

Can the U.S. Government Fix College Financing? - Opinion

October 16, 2018

Brian Boswell writes: Tuition inflation is out of control, having risen an average of 5.25% annually from 2000 to 2018 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Compare that to “normal” U.S. inflation of 2.70%, as measured by the Consumer Price Index, and it’s clear that something needs to be done to ensure higher education remains attainable for U.S. stakeholders that want to attend college. The problem is where to find the money. Two recent studies highlight the current challenges facing the United States in funding higher education for its citizens and residents.
Brian Boswell writes: Tuition inflation is out of control, having risen an average of 5.25% annually from 2000 to 2018 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Compare that to “normal” U.S. inflation of 2.70%, as measured by the Consumer Price Index, and it’s clear that something needs to be done to ensure higher education remains attainable for U.S. stakeholders that want to attend college. The problem is where to find the money. Two recent studies highlight the current challenges facing the United States in funding higher education for its citizens and residents.

October 16, 2018

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The State Journal-Register, IL

Independent Colleges Key to Improving Illinois Higher Education - Opinion

Independent Colleges Key to Improving Illinois Higher Education - O...

October 16, 2018

David W. Tretter, president of the Federation of Independent Illinois Colleges and Universities, writes: In the last 15 years, Illinois disinvested in higher education by $1 billion. The results were devastating: higher tuition, students flocking away from campuses instead of to them, and some institutions left on fiscal life support.
David W. Tretter, president of the Federation of Independent Illinois Colleges and Universities, writes: In the last 15 years, Illinois disinvested in higher education by $1 billion. The results were devastating: higher tuition, students flocking away from campuses instead of to them, and some institutions left on fiscal life support.

October 16, 2018

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The New York Times

Think Professors Are Liberal? Try School Administrators - Opinion

Think Professors Are Liberal? Try School Administrators - Opinion

October 16, 2018

Samuel J. Abrams, professor of politics at Sarah Lawrence College, writes: While considerable focus has been placed in recent decades on the impact of the ideological bent of college professors, when it comes to collegiate life — living in dorms, participating in extracurricular organizations — the ever growing ranks of administrators have the biggest influence on students and campus life across the country.
Samuel J. Abrams, professor of politics at Sarah Lawrence College, writes: While considerable focus has been placed in recent decades on the impact of the ideological bent of college professors, when it comes to collegiate life — living in dorms, participating in extracurricular organizations — the ever growing ranks of administrators have the biggest influence on students and campus life across the country.

October 16, 2018

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Multiple Sources

Round-up: Harvard Admissions Trial Opens Today

Round-up: Harvard Admissions Trial Opens Today

October 15, 2018

The lawsuit accusing Harvard University of illegally discriminating against Asian-American applicants by holding them to a higher standard than students of other races opens today in a Boston courtroom. Harvard denies the allegation, saying race is one of many factors it considers when determining whom to accept.

The Wall Street Journal reports William Fitzsimmons, 74 years old, who has been dean of admissions at Harvard since 1986, is expected to be the first witness after opening statements. He is considered an architect of holistic admissions, which consider not just applicants’ academic credentials, but also extracurricular activities, formative experiences and personal attributes. Many top universities use the same model to select their student bodies.
 
The trial stems from a lawsuit filed in 2014 by Students for Fair Admissions, a nonprofit whose members include Asian-Americans rejected by Harvard. The group is run by conservative legal strategist Edward Blum, who has funded other challenges to affirmative action, including a pending case against the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  The trial is expected to last three weeks.
 
Below is a roundup of news coverage on the start of the trial: 
 
Harvard Trial Will Open With Admissions Dean in Hot Seat
The Wall Street Journal
 
Here’s What You Need to Know About the Harvard Admissions Trial
The Boston Globe
 
Harvard Admissions Goes on Trial as University Faces Claim of Bias Against Asian Americans
The Washington Post
 
As Harvard’s Admissions Policy Goes on Trial, Alleged Victims of Racial Bias Remain Anonymous
The Washington Post
 
On Eve of Harvard Bias Trial, Dueling Rallies Show Rifts Among Asian-Americans
The New York Times

‘We’re Here to Say No’: Asian American Critics Rally Against Harvard Admissions Policy
The Washington Post
 
Elite-College Admissions Are Broken
The Atlantic
 
The Harvard Case Is About the Future of Affirmative Action
The Atlantic
 
The Supreme Court Justice Who Forever Changed Affirmative Action
The Atlantic

Harvard’s Race-Conscious Admissions Policy Goes on Trial on Monday. Here’s What to Expect.
The Chronicle of Higher Education
 
Dueling Rallies on Eve of Harvard Trial
Inside Higher Ed
 
Long-Awaited Harvard Admissions Trial Begins
Politico
 
The Political Incentive for Trump to Join the Harvard Fight
Politico

 
The lawsuit accusing Harvard University of illegally discriminating against Asian-American applicants by holding them to a higher standard than students of other races opens today in a Boston courtroom. Harvard denies the allegation, saying race is one of many factors it considers when determining whom to accept.

The Wall Street Journal reports William Fitzsimmons, 74 years old, who has been dean of admissions at Harvard since 1986, is expected to be the first witness after opening statements. He is considered an architect of holistic admissions, which consider not just applicants’ academic credentials, but also extracurricular activities, formative experiences and personal attributes. Many top universities use the same model to select their student bodies.
 
The trial stems from a lawsuit filed in 2014 by Students for Fair Admissions, a nonprofit whose members include Asian-Americans rejected by Harvard. The group is run by conservative legal strategist Edward Blum, who has funded other challenges to affirmative action, including a pending case against the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  The trial is expected to last three weeks.
 
Below is a roundup of news coverage on the start of the trial: 
 
Harvard Trial Will Open With Admissions Dean in Hot Seat
The Wall Street Journal
 
Here’s What You Need to Know About the Harvard Admissions Trial
The Boston Globe
 
Harvard Admissions Goes on Trial as University Faces Claim of Bias Against Asian Americans
The Washington Post
 
As Harvard’s Admissions Policy Goes on Trial, Alleged Victims of Racial Bias Remain Anonymous
The Washington Post
 
On Eve of Harvard Bias Trial, Dueling Rallies Show Rifts Among Asian-Americans
The New York Times

‘We’re Here to Say No’: Asian American Critics Rally Against Harvard Admissions Policy
The Washington Post
 
Elite-College Admissions Are Broken
The Atlantic
 
The Harvard Case Is About the Future of Affirmative Action
The Atlantic
 
The Supreme Court Justice Who Forever Changed Affirmative Action
The Atlantic

Harvard’s Race-Conscious Admissions Policy Goes on Trial on Monday. Here’s What to Expect.
The Chronicle of Higher Education
 
Dueling Rallies on Eve of Harvard Trial
Inside Higher Ed
 
Long-Awaited Harvard Admissions Trial Begins
Politico
 
The Political Incentive for Trump to Join the Harvard Fight
Politico

 

October 15, 2018

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