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Round-up: Undergraduate Fall Enrollment Declines 3.2%, Graduate Enrollment Up 2.1%

Round-up: Undergraduate Fall Enrollment Declines 3.2%, Graduate Enr...

October 26, 2021

Early data from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center show college and university undergraduate enrollments fell by 3.2 percent fall.  The September 2021 drops follows a 3.4 percent decline in 2020. Since fall 2019, undergraduate enrollments have dropped by 6.5 percent.
 
While undergraduate enrollment is down in all sectors, private nonprofit four-year students fared better, falling only 0.7 percent this fall due to 4.3 percent more students enrolled in highly selective institutions.
 
Graduate enrollment continued to grow, reaching 2.1 percent above last fall’s level, for a total growth of 5.3 percent over two years.
 
Below is a sampling of media coverage of this new report:
 
 
First-Look Fall 2021 Enrollment
National Student Clearinghouse (October 26, 2021)
 
Undergraduate Enrollment Continues Its Slide, Dipping 3.2 Percent From Last Year
The Chronicle of Higher Education (October 26, 2021)
 
These Were Last Fall’s Winners and Losers in Undergraduate Enrollment
The Chronicle of Higher Education (October 8, 2021)
 
Enrollments Still Falling 2 Years Into Pandemic
Inside Higher Ed (October 26, 2021)
 
Nationwide College Enrollment Continues to Slide
The Washington Post (October 26, 2021)
 
Sobering New Numbers Show Fall College Enrollment Continuing to Slump Across Pa., U.S.
Pittsburgh Post Gazette (October 26, 2021)
 
Down 3.2% This Fall, College Enrollment Numbers May Reach 50-Year Low
UniversityBusiness.com (October 26, 2021)
 
College Enrollment on Track for Largest Two-Year Drop on Record
US News & World Report (October 26, 2021)
 
Undergraduate Enrollment Drops 3.2% This Fall, Deepening Last Year's Losses
HigherEdDive.com (October 26, 2021)
 
Early data from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center show college and university undergraduate enrollments fell by 3.2 percent fall.  The September 2021 drops follows a 3.4 percent decline in 2020. Since fall 2019, undergraduate enrollments have dropped by 6.5 percent.
 
While undergraduate enrollment is down in all sectors, private nonprofit four-year students fared better, falling only 0.7 percent this fall due to 4.3 percent more students enrolled in highly selective institutions.
 
Graduate enrollment continued to grow, reaching 2.1 percent above last fall’s level, for a total growth of 5.3 percent over two years.
 
Below is a sampling of media coverage of this new report:
 
 
First-Look Fall 2021 Enrollment
National Student Clearinghouse (October 26, 2021)
 
Undergraduate Enrollment Continues Its Slide, Dipping 3.2 Percent From Last Year
The Chronicle of Higher Education (October 26, 2021)
 
These Were Last Fall’s Winners and Losers in Undergraduate Enrollment
The Chronicle of Higher Education (October 8, 2021)
 
Enrollments Still Falling 2 Years Into Pandemic
Inside Higher Ed (October 26, 2021)
 
Nationwide College Enrollment Continues to Slide
The Washington Post (October 26, 2021)
 
Sobering New Numbers Show Fall College Enrollment Continuing to Slump Across Pa., U.S.
Pittsburgh Post Gazette (October 26, 2021)
 
Down 3.2% This Fall, College Enrollment Numbers May Reach 50-Year Low
UniversityBusiness.com (October 26, 2021)
 
College Enrollment on Track for Largest Two-Year Drop on Record
US News & World Report (October 26, 2021)
 
Undergraduate Enrollment Drops 3.2% This Fall, Deepening Last Year's Losses
HigherEdDive.com (October 26, 2021)
 

October 26, 2021

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Des Moines Register, IA

Academic Institutions Can Do More To Support Non-Traditional Independent Students - Opinion Piece

Academic Institutions Can Do More To Support Non-Traditional Indepe...

October 26, 2021

Dustin Rush writes: As administrators across the nation guide their academic institutions through the pandemic, one of their top priorities has been ensuring students can return to traditional learning experiences. While this march toward normalcy is much-anticipated, administrators shouldn’t overlook the benefits of hybrid learning for non-traditional independent students like myself.
Dustin Rush writes: As administrators across the nation guide their academic institutions through the pandemic, one of their top priorities has been ensuring students can return to traditional learning experiences. While this march toward normalcy is much-anticipated, administrators shouldn’t overlook the benefits of hybrid learning for non-traditional independent students like myself.

October 26, 2021

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TheConversation.com

Future Of College Will Involve Fewer Professors - Opinion Piece

Future Of College Will Involve Fewer Professors - Opinion Piece

October 26, 2021

Patricia A. Young writes: I forecast this future scenario and other trends in my 2021 book “Human Specialization in Design and Technology: The Current Wave for Learning, Culture, Industry and Beyond.” As a researcher who specializes in educational technology, I see three trends that will further shrink the role of traditional college professors.
Patricia A. Young writes: I forecast this future scenario and other trends in my 2021 book “Human Specialization in Design and Technology: The Current Wave for Learning, Culture, Industry and Beyond.” As a researcher who specializes in educational technology, I see three trends that will further shrink the role of traditional college professors.

October 26, 2021

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The Chronicle of Higher Education

How Time-Management and Other Tools Can Help Students With Mental Illnesses Stay Enrolled

How Time-Management and Other Tools Can Help Students With Mental I...

October 26, 2021

When students are diagnosed with a mental illness at college, they often receive counseling and medication. They don’t typically get training in time management. Michelle Mullen, a researcher at the University of Massachusetts Chan Medical School, is trying to change that.
When students are diagnosed with a mental illness at college, they often receive counseling and medication. They don’t typically get training in time management. Michelle Mullen, a researcher at the University of Massachusetts Chan Medical School, is trying to change that.

October 26, 2021

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BusinessInsider.com

A Growing Number Of Colleges Are Abolishing Student Loans To Avoid Making The $1.7 Trillion Debt Crisis Worse

A Growing Number Of Colleges Are Abolishing Student Loans To Avoid ...

October 26, 2021

A growing number of colleges are removing student loans from financial aid packages, offering grants instead.
A growing number of colleges are removing student loans from financial aid packages, offering grants instead.

October 26, 2021

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