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Round-up: Biden Administration Extends Student Loan Payment Pause Through June 30 - November 28, 2022

Round-up: Biden Administration Extends Student Loan Payment Pause ...

November 28, 2022

The Biden Administration extended the COVID pandemic-related pause on student loan repayment, interest and collections through June 30, 2023 pending the results of the Supreme Court review of lower-court orders halting the president’s student debt relief plan.  Payments will resume 60 days after the decision or on September 1, 2023.  
 
More than 26 million have applied for debt relief, and 16 million borrowers have been approved by the Education Department. Court orders from judges in two different lawsuits are blocking the Department from discharging student loan debt and accepting additional applications. 
 
Below is the latest national media coverage:
 
Biden-Harris Administration Continues Fight for Student Debt Relief for Millions of Borrowers, Extends Student Loan Repayment Pause
U.S. Department of Education (November 22, 2022)
 
Quiet on Debt Relief
Inside Higher Ed (November 28, 2022)
 
How Student-Loan Debt, or Not Having It, Shapes Lives
The Wall Street Journal (November 28, 2022)
 
Payment Pause Extended Amid Legal Battles
Inside Higher Ed (November 23, 2022)
 
Student Loan-Payment Freeze Extended as Courts Weigh Debt Relief
The Washington Post (November 23, 2022)
 
White House Extends Pause on Student Loan Payments
The New York Times (November 22, 2022)
 
Biden Administration Extends Pause on Federal Student Loan Payments
The Wall Street Journal (November 22, 2022)
 
Student-Loan Holders See New Path for Wiping Out Debt Through Bankruptcy
The Wall Street Journal (November 21, 2022)
 
The Biden Administration extended the COVID pandemic-related pause on student loan repayment, interest and collections through June 30, 2023 pending the results of the Supreme Court review of lower-court orders halting the president’s student debt relief plan.  Payments will resume 60 days after the decision or on September 1, 2023.  
 
More than 26 million have applied for debt relief, and 16 million borrowers have been approved by the Education Department. Court orders from judges in two different lawsuits are blocking the Department from discharging student loan debt and accepting additional applications. 
 
Below is the latest national media coverage:
 
Biden-Harris Administration Continues Fight for Student Debt Relief for Millions of Borrowers, Extends Student Loan Repayment Pause
U.S. Department of Education (November 22, 2022)
 
Quiet on Debt Relief
Inside Higher Ed (November 28, 2022)
 
How Student-Loan Debt, or Not Having It, Shapes Lives
The Wall Street Journal (November 28, 2022)
 
Payment Pause Extended Amid Legal Battles
Inside Higher Ed (November 23, 2022)
 
Student Loan-Payment Freeze Extended as Courts Weigh Debt Relief
The Washington Post (November 23, 2022)
 
White House Extends Pause on Student Loan Payments
The New York Times (November 22, 2022)
 
Biden Administration Extends Pause on Federal Student Loan Payments
The Wall Street Journal (November 22, 2022)
 
Student-Loan Holders See New Path for Wiping Out Debt Through Bankruptcy
The Wall Street Journal (November 21, 2022)
 

November 28, 2022

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The Chronicle of Higher Education

Test-Optional Policies Now Dominate Higher Ed

Test-Optional Policies Now Dominate Higher Ed

November 28, 2022

Admissions policies that give applicants the option of whether to submit their standardized test scores have been growing steadily over the years, sparked by long-running concerns about how the tests can contribute to racial and socioeconomic inequality and more-immediate pandemic-driven logistical challenges. Lately, a sea change has overtaken higher education: Over 800 institutions shifted to test-optional policies between the fall 2019 and fall 2021 admissions cycles, according to new data from the U.S. Department of Education. Only about 160 institutions still classify themselves as requiring test scores.
 
Admissions policies that give applicants the option of whether to submit their standardized test scores have been growing steadily over the years, sparked by long-running concerns about how the tests can contribute to racial and socioeconomic inequality and more-immediate pandemic-driven logistical challenges. Lately, a sea change has overtaken higher education: Over 800 institutions shifted to test-optional policies between the fall 2019 and fall 2021 admissions cycles, according to new data from the U.S. Department of Education. Only about 160 institutions still classify themselves as requiring test scores.
 

November 28, 2022

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The Wall Street Journal

Employers Rethink Need for College Degrees in Tight Labor Market

Employers Rethink Need for College Degrees in Tight Labor Market

November 28, 2022

The tight labor market is prompting more employers to eliminate one of the biggest requirements for many higher-paying jobs: the need for a college degree. Companies such as Alphabet Inc.’s Google, Delta Air Lines Inc. and International Business Machines Corp. have reduced educational requirements for certain positions and shifted hiring to focus more on skills and experience. U.S. job postings requiring at least a bachelor’s degree were 41% in November, down from 46% at the start of 2019 ahead of the Covid-19 pandemic, according to an analysis by the Burning Glass Institute.
The tight labor market is prompting more employers to eliminate one of the biggest requirements for many higher-paying jobs: the need for a college degree. Companies such as Alphabet Inc.’s Google, Delta Air Lines Inc. and International Business Machines Corp. have reduced educational requirements for certain positions and shifted hiring to focus more on skills and experience. U.S. job postings requiring at least a bachelor’s degree were 41% in November, down from 46% at the start of 2019 ahead of the Covid-19 pandemic, according to an analysis by the Burning Glass Institute.

November 28, 2022

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The Washington Post

UC-Berkeley Can’t Use Race in Admissions. Is It a Model for the Country?

UC-Berkeley Can’t Use Race in Admissions. Is It a Model for the Cou...

November 28, 2022

The University of California at Berkeley has labored to enroll more Black and Latino students in the quarter century since the state barred the consideration of race or ethnicity in its admissions. Still, those groups remain underrepresented at the renowned public university here on the eastern shore of the San Francisco Bay. The gap is huge for Latino students. They account for 55 percent of California’s public school students, state data show, but 19 percent of UC-Berkeley undergraduates.
The University of California at Berkeley has labored to enroll more Black and Latino students in the quarter century since the state barred the consideration of race or ethnicity in its admissions. Still, those groups remain underrepresented at the renowned public university here on the eastern shore of the San Francisco Bay. The gap is huge for Latino students. They account for 55 percent of California’s public school students, state data show, but 19 percent of UC-Berkeley undergraduates.

November 28, 2022

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ESPN

College Athletes Advocating for Revenue Sharing, New Model

College Athletes Advocating for Revenue Sharing, New Model

November 18, 2022

A pair of veteran college basketball players plan to use Wednesday night's game between Pittsburgh and No. 20 Michigan to start publicly campaigning for the NCAA and its schools to share revenue with athletes.
Michigan's Hunter Dickinson and Pitt's Jamarius Burton are among a group of athletes who will be writing the letter S on their hands during games this season to draw attention to their attempt to advocate for a new business model in college sports. The S, according to the players, stands for share. They are hoping to amplify calls for the NCAA to change its rules in a way that allows the association and its school to distribute more of its resources to athletes.
A pair of veteran college basketball players plan to use Wednesday night's game between Pittsburgh and No. 20 Michigan to start publicly campaigning for the NCAA and its schools to share revenue with athletes.
Michigan's Hunter Dickinson and Pitt's Jamarius Burton are among a group of athletes who will be writing the letter S on their hands during games this season to draw attention to their attempt to advocate for a new business model in college sports. The S, according to the players, stands for share. They are hoping to amplify calls for the NCAA to change its rules in a way that allows the association and its school to distribute more of its resources to athletes.

November 18, 2022

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