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Inside Higher Ed

Higher Education’s ‘White Power’

Higher Education’s ‘White Power’

November 10, 2017

President of higher ed research group documents white dominance in the academy and urges scholars to use their work to help disenfranchised people.
President of higher ed research group documents white dominance in the academy and urges scholars to use their work to help disenfranchised people.

November 10, 2017

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Inside Higher Ed

Veterans at Selective Colleges, 2017 - Opinion

Veterans at Selective Colleges, 2017 - Opinion

November 10, 2017

Wick Sloane, a 2017 winner of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Governor’s Award for Excellence in Public Service, writes: Yale University this fall has 12 undergraduate veterans, Harvard University six, Princeton University five and Williams College five. That’s 28 undergraduate veterans, short of the 44 students needed to field one offensive and one defensive squad each for a football game. The institutions' cumulative total last year was 18. Progress? I wish I knew. Add the five veterans at Williams’s chief rival, Amherst College? Still 11 to go for a football game.
Wick Sloane, a 2017 winner of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Governor’s Award for Excellence in Public Service, writes: Yale University this fall has 12 undergraduate veterans, Harvard University six, Princeton University five and Williams College five. That’s 28 undergraduate veterans, short of the 44 students needed to field one offensive and one defensive squad each for a football game. The institutions' cumulative total last year was 18. Progress? I wish I knew. Add the five veterans at Williams’s chief rival, Amherst College? Still 11 to go for a football game.

November 10, 2017

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The Chronicle of Higher Education

Why Faculty Members Still Aren’t Sure What to Make of Education Technology

Why Faculty Members Still Aren’t Sure What to Make of Education Tec...

November 10, 2017

Ask faculty members what they think of technology in teaching, and you’ll get a lot of seemingly contradictory opinions. They are skeptical of online learning. But they think technology can make them better teachers. They want more high-tech tools but prefer not to do anything too complicated with them. They want more research on whether technology improves learning but often rely on colleagues when figuring out what to use.
Ask faculty members what they think of technology in teaching, and you’ll get a lot of seemingly contradictory opinions. They are skeptical of online learning. But they think technology can make them better teachers. They want more high-tech tools but prefer not to do anything too complicated with them. They want more research on whether technology improves learning but often rely on colleagues when figuring out what to use.

November 10, 2017

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The Chronicle of Higher Education

Which Colleges Do Students Say Defraud Them Most Often? For-Profit Colleges

Which Colleges Do Students Say Defraud Them Most Often? For-Profit ...

November 10, 2017

Nearly all allegations of fraud submitted to the U.S. Department of Education by students concern for-profit colleges, according to a new report from the Century Foundation.
Nearly all allegations of fraud submitted to the U.S. Department of Education by students concern for-profit colleges, according to a new report from the Century Foundation.

November 10, 2017

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NBC News

When College Classrooms Become Ideologically Segregated, Everyone Suffers - Opinion

When College Classrooms Become Ideologically Segregated, Everyone S...

November 10, 2017

Jon A. Shields, associate professor of government at Claremont McKenna College (CA), writes: Americans seem increasingly to be sorting themselves into communities of the like-minded. This new political segregation is evident in nearly all institutions of American life — from the neighborhoods we call home to the mass media we consume. It is also reshaping classrooms in America’s universities — one of the few institutions capable of encouraging civil and reasonable disagreement in our polarized nation.
Jon A. Shields, associate professor of government at Claremont McKenna College (CA), writes: Americans seem increasingly to be sorting themselves into communities of the like-minded. This new political segregation is evident in nearly all institutions of American life — from the neighborhoods we call home to the mass media we consume. It is also reshaping classrooms in America’s universities — one of the few institutions capable of encouraging civil and reasonable disagreement in our polarized nation.

November 10, 2017

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