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Forbes.com

Why Biden’s Student-Debt Plan Misses The Real Problem - Opinion

Why Biden’s Student-Debt Plan Misses The Real Problem - Opinion

November 25, 2020

Steve Forbes, chairman and editor-in-chief of Forbes Media, writes: One of the first things Joe Biden wants to do when he becomes president is to cancel all or part of the outstanding student debt, now totaling $1.5 trillion.  But there are two big problems with this plan.  [See Video Clip]
Steve Forbes, chairman and editor-in-chief of Forbes Media, writes: One of the first things Joe Biden wants to do when he becomes president is to cancel all or part of the outstanding student debt, now totaling $1.5 trillion.  But there are two big problems with this plan.  [See Video Clip]

November 25, 2020

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Inside Higher Ed

Front and Center

Front and Center

November 24, 2020

For many Black women in higher education, Kamala Harris’s election as vice president of the United States is a moment of gratification and recognition, a symbol of what’s to come and what always has been.
For many Black women in higher education, Kamala Harris’s election as vice president of the United States is a moment of gratification and recognition, a symbol of what’s to come and what always has been.

November 24, 2020

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EducationDive.com

New Programs Aren't Paying Off For All Colleges: Report

New Programs Aren't Paying Off For All Colleges: Report

November 24, 2020

Many of the academic programs colleges have added in recent years don't produce many graduates down the road, according to a new analysis by Burning Glass Technologies.  The labor market analytics firm found that of programs that first graduated students in the 2012-13 and 2013-2014 school years, about 30% didn't have a single graduate in 2018. Burning Glass notes those programs had relatively few graduates in that roughly five-year period.
Many of the academic programs colleges have added in recent years don't produce many graduates down the road, according to a new analysis by Burning Glass Technologies.  The labor market analytics firm found that of programs that first graduated students in the 2012-13 and 2013-2014 school years, about 30% didn't have a single graduate in 2018. Burning Glass notes those programs had relatively few graduates in that roughly five-year period.

November 24, 2020

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EducationDive.com

The Ed Dept's New Clery Act Guide Raises New Questions - Opinion

The Ed Dept's New Clery Act Guide Raises New Questions - Opinion

November 24, 2020

Melissa Carleton, a partner at Bricker & Eckler, in Ohio, focusing on higher education, writes: While it might appear otherwise based on its new, 554-page Title IX regulations, the current administration has attempted to reduce the regulatory burden on colleges and universities. One of the most recent examples of this is the rescission of the 265-page "Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting."
Melissa Carleton, a partner at Bricker & Eckler, in Ohio, focusing on higher education, writes: While it might appear otherwise based on its new, 554-page Title IX regulations, the current administration has attempted to reduce the regulatory burden on colleges and universities. One of the most recent examples of this is the rescission of the 265-page "Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting."

November 24, 2020

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Wall Street Journal

Student Loan Losses Seen Costing U.S. More Than $400 Billion

Student Loan Losses Seen Costing U.S. More Than $400 Billion

November 23, 2020

The U.S. government stands to lose more than $400 billion from the federal student loan program, an internal analysis shows, approaching the size of losses incurred by banks during the subprime-mortgage crisis. The Education Department, with the help of two private consultants, looked at $1.37 trillion in student loans held by the government at the start of the year. Their conclusion: Borrowers will pay back $935 billion in principal and interest. That would leave taxpayers on the hook for $435 billion, according to documents reviewed by The Wall Street Journal.
 
The U.S. government stands to lose more than $400 billion from the federal student loan program, an internal analysis shows, approaching the size of losses incurred by banks during the subprime-mortgage crisis. The Education Department, with the help of two private consultants, looked at $1.37 trillion in student loans held by the government at the start of the year. Their conclusion: Borrowers will pay back $935 billion in principal and interest. That would leave taxpayers on the hook for $435 billion, according to documents reviewed by The Wall Street Journal.
 

November 23, 2020

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