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Inside Higher Ed

As Pathway Market Expands, Enrollment Outcomes Diverge

As Pathway Market Expands, Enrollment Outcomes Diverge

June 19, 2018

Growing numbers of American universities are contracting with corporate entities to recruit for and help manage first-year “pathway” programs for international students who don’t meet the criteria for direct admission. The number of such pathway programs in the U.S. has grown from a mere handful to more than 50 within the past decade. The programs proliferate even as the total number of new international students coming to the U.S. declines and competition for every full-pay international student intensifies.
Growing numbers of American universities are contracting with corporate entities to recruit for and help manage first-year “pathway” programs for international students who don’t meet the criteria for direct admission. The number of such pathway programs in the U.S. has grown from a mere handful to more than 50 within the past decade. The programs proliferate even as the total number of new international students coming to the U.S. declines and competition for every full-pay international student intensifies.

June 19, 2018

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The Chronicle of Higher Education

Want to Kill Tenure? Be Careful What You Wish for

Want to Kill Tenure? Be Careful What You Wish for

June 19, 2018

Wisconsin, Kentucky, Arkansas, and Tennessee have all made policy moves in recent years that have sought to to weaken tenure, or that faculty members have interpreted as threats to it. Leaders of some private colleges who want to adapt more quickly to marketplace demands have invoked dire institutional finances as a reason to propose — if not always follow through on — cutting tenured faculty. For both political reasons and because of institutional policy choices, tenure arguably faces more peril now than it has in nearly 70 years.
Wisconsin, Kentucky, Arkansas, and Tennessee have all made policy moves in recent years that have sought to to weaken tenure, or that faculty members have interpreted as threats to it. Leaders of some private colleges who want to adapt more quickly to marketplace demands have invoked dire institutional finances as a reason to propose — if not always follow through on — cutting tenured faculty. For both political reasons and because of institutional policy choices, tenure arguably faces more peril now than it has in nearly 70 years.

June 19, 2018

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The Hill

Fixing Accreditation: The Third Rail of Higher Education Reform – Opinion

Fixing Accreditation: The Third Rail of Higher Education Reform – O...

June 19, 2018

Emily Bouck, policy and advocacy director at Higher Learning Advocates and previously served as deputy legislative director to U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), writes:  While it may not receive the same splashy headlines as student debt, our accreditation system holds the key to ensuring the quality of America’s colleges and universities and strong stewardship of taxpayer dollars.  America’s approach to higher education quality is the result of decades of gradual policy change and arrangements between government and academe convenient at the time, but no longer adequate for community and workforce needs. Accreditation began as a regional process of voluntary peer review in the 19th century, but has turned into something very different.
Emily Bouck, policy and advocacy director at Higher Learning Advocates and previously served as deputy legislative director to U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), writes:  While it may not receive the same splashy headlines as student debt, our accreditation system holds the key to ensuring the quality of America’s colleges and universities and strong stewardship of taxpayer dollars.  America’s approach to higher education quality is the result of decades of gradual policy change and arrangements between government and academe convenient at the time, but no longer adequate for community and workforce needs. Accreditation began as a regional process of voluntary peer review in the 19th century, but has turned into something very different.

June 19, 2018

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Inside Higher Ed

The Problem with Giving Days - Column

The Problem with Giving Days - Column

June 19, 2018

Communications Strategist Matt Hames writes:  There are many reasons to give to a college or university. It could be a personal connection, such as fond memories of an alma mater or pride in the school of a child or grandchild. It could be because the gift helps fund the journey of the next student. These reasons could generate $20 yearly pledges or perhaps even a $20 million special gift because they are based on emotion.  Donors are willing to give their money because they’re emotionally invested in the school. The more personal the gift, the more likely it will be an annual event.  So, can we talk about #givingdays?
Communications Strategist Matt Hames writes:  There are many reasons to give to a college or university. It could be a personal connection, such as fond memories of an alma mater or pride in the school of a child or grandchild. It could be because the gift helps fund the journey of the next student. These reasons could generate $20 yearly pledges or perhaps even a $20 million special gift because they are based on emotion.  Donors are willing to give their money because they’re emotionally invested in the school. The more personal the gift, the more likely it will be an annual event.  So, can we talk about #givingdays?

June 19, 2018

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Wall Street Journal

Colleges Team Up for Report Card on Fraternities to Curb Bad Behavior

Colleges Team Up for Report Card on Fraternities to Curb Bad Behavior

June 18, 2018

Dozens of universities are banding together with a new reporting system to keep tabs on Greek organizations in hopes of curbing hazing, sexual assault and alcohol abuse.  Dozens of schools, including Penn State, Florida State and Louisiana State University, are supporting the creation on a scorecard for fraternities and sororities to track things like cumulative GPA, alcohol and hazing violations and chapter suspensions. The goal is to discern patterns, identify bad actors and provide leverage to hold national organizations to account.
Dozens of universities are banding together with a new reporting system to keep tabs on Greek organizations in hopes of curbing hazing, sexual assault and alcohol abuse.  Dozens of schools, including Penn State, Florida State and Louisiana State University, are supporting the creation on a scorecard for fraternities and sororities to track things like cumulative GPA, alcohol and hazing violations and chapter suspensions. The goal is to discern patterns, identify bad actors and provide leverage to hold national organizations to account.

June 18, 2018

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