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New Hampshire Union Leader, Manchester, NH

Monks at St. Anselm Sue, Worried About College's Catholic Identity

Monks at St. Anselm Sue, Worried About College's Catholic Identity

December 12, 2019


The lawsuit, filed late last month in Hillsborough County Superior Court in Manchester, asks a judge to prohibit college trustees from changing bylaws without the consent of the monks, whose order founded the university.
 

 

 

The lawsuit, filed late last month in Hillsborough County Superior Court in Manchester, asks a judge to prohibit college trustees from changing bylaws without the consent of the monks, whose order founded the university.
 

 

 

December 12, 2019

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The Chronicle of Higher Education

The Administration Is Assuming That We Are Going to Do Their Dirty Work’

The Administration Is Assuming That We Are Going to Do Their Dirty ...

December 12, 2019

Harvard graduate students are on strike. On December 3, more than 4,000 members of Harvard Graduate Students Union-UAW hit the picket line after negotiations with the university hit an impasse. The union, which the university formally recognized in May 2018, has been negotiating with Harvard officials for over a year. HGSU-UAW is demanding better pay and more benefits to address what graduate workers have reported as unmanageable costs of living — covering basic necessities like housing, child care, and mental-health care — in one of the most expensive areas of the country.
Harvard graduate students are on strike. On December 3, more than 4,000 members of Harvard Graduate Students Union-UAW hit the picket line after negotiations with the university hit an impasse. The union, which the university formally recognized in May 2018, has been negotiating with Harvard officials for over a year. HGSU-UAW is demanding better pay and more benefits to address what graduate workers have reported as unmanageable costs of living — covering basic necessities like housing, child care, and mental-health care — in one of the most expensive areas of the country.

December 12, 2019

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The Washington Post

Columbia Will Give Full Scholarships to Refugees and Other Displaced Students

Columbia Will Give Full Scholarships to Refugees and Other Displace...

December 11, 2019

On Wednesday, Columbia announced a global effort to help people like Sahtout — refugees and students displaced by wars and natural disasters. The Columbia University Scholarship for Displaced Students, underwritten with a commitment of up to $6 million a year, is the first of its kind in the world, university officials said. As many as 30 students a year who are admitted to any of the university’s undergraduate or graduate programs will have all of their education and living expenses covered.
On Wednesday, Columbia announced a global effort to help people like Sahtout — refugees and students displaced by wars and natural disasters. The Columbia University Scholarship for Displaced Students, underwritten with a commitment of up to $6 million a year, is the first of its kind in the world, university officials said. As many as 30 students a year who are admitted to any of the university’s undergraduate or graduate programs will have all of their education and living expenses covered.

December 11, 2019

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UniversityBusiness.com

How a Rural College Powers K-12 in a Depressed Region

How a Rural College Powers K-12 in a Depressed Region

December 11, 2019

The collapse of the coal industry and the opioid epidemic continue to decimate Kentucky’s Appalachian region, disrupting families and sapping crucial tax dollars from rural schools. At the same time, these cash-strapped district administrators are having to provide more basic services to students, who may show up for class hungry, homeless or in need of health care. In response, Berea College, a 1,600-student liberal arts institution that doesn’t charge tuition, has vastly expanded its K-12 assistance program, Partners for Education, to provide “cradle-to-career” services to Appalachian families in some of the country’s poorest communities.
The collapse of the coal industry and the opioid epidemic continue to decimate Kentucky’s Appalachian region, disrupting families and sapping crucial tax dollars from rural schools. At the same time, these cash-strapped district administrators are having to provide more basic services to students, who may show up for class hungry, homeless or in need of health care. In response, Berea College, a 1,600-student liberal arts institution that doesn’t charge tuition, has vastly expanded its K-12 assistance program, Partners for Education, to provide “cradle-to-career” services to Appalachian families in some of the country’s poorest communities.

December 11, 2019

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WGBH.org

In A Tiny Vermont Town, A College Closes And The Local Economy Slips

In A Tiny Vermont Town, A College Closes And The Local Economy Slips

December 10, 2019

On most college campuses, December marks the end of the semester, but for the first time in 185 years there was no fall semester at Green Mountain College in southwestern Vermont. The closing of the liberal arts college last spring has hurt the local economy in the tiny town of Poultney — population 3,339.
On most college campuses, December marks the end of the semester, but for the first time in 185 years there was no fall semester at Green Mountain College in southwestern Vermont. The closing of the liberal arts college last spring has hurt the local economy in the tiny town of Poultney — population 3,339.

December 10, 2019

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About the items posted on the NAICU site: News items, features, and opinion pieces posted on this site from sources outside NAICU do not necessarily reflect the position of the association or its members. Rather, this content reflects the diversity of issues and views that are shaping American higher education.

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