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NAICU President Barbara K. Mistick, D.M. Issues Statement on President-elect Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan

NAICU President Barbara K. Mistick, D.M. Issues Statement on Presi...

January 15, 2021

WASHINGTON, DC (January 15, 2021) – NAICU President Barbara K. Mistick, D.M. has issued the following statement regarding the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan announced last night by President-elect Joe Biden.

The plan provides $35 billion in funding for two- and four-year public institutions, as well as, public and private Historically Black Colleges and Universities and other Minority Serving Institutions.

“The global coronavirus pandemic has indiscriminately impacted all sectors of our nation, including private, nonprofit higher education.  President-elect Joe Biden’s ambitious $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan, released last night, provides $35 billion in funding for two- and four-year public institutions, as well as, public and private Historically Black Colleges and Universities and other Minority Serving Institutions.”

“NAICU is very disappointed that the majority of the nation’s private, nonprofit colleges and universities were excluded from the Biden plan.  This awful virus does not distinguish among types of colleges and neither should our unified national fight against this disease. With more than 1,700 degree-granting private, nonprofit colleges and universities, located in all 50 states and in 391 congressional districts, private, nonprofit colleges enroll over 5.1 million students and provide more than 1.2 million administration, faculty and staff jobs to the economy.”

“Low income students, regardless of their college of choice, face the same daunting challenges during this time, including paying college expenses and covering their daily living expenses. Private, nonprofit and public colleges enroll similar percentages of students who are Pell Grant recipients: 38% at private, nonprofit four-year colleges compared to 40% at public institutions.”

“Colleges and universities, whether public or private, are facing significant challenges to their operations as the pandemic continues.  Increased expenses for online learning, COVID testing programs, enhanced cleaning and maintenance have stretched university budgets beyond the limit.”

“Most of the more than 1,700 private, nonprofit colleges and universities nationwide are critical economic drivers in their communities, often serving as the largest employer and source of economic and cultural activity.”

“Private, nonprofit colleges and universities are integral and irreplaceable parts of our society.  Their value is demonstrated across rural, suburban and urban communities across the country.  The entire nation is enduring this pandemic, now is not the time favor one sector over another.”

“We look forward to working with the new Administration to ensure we are all working together to combat this disease and to ensure our institutions and the students and communities we serve are partnering with them to help solve this challenge.”

Barbara K. Mistick, D.M.
President
National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU)


 
WASHINGTON, DC (January 15, 2021) – NAICU President Barbara K. Mistick, D.M. has issued the following statement regarding the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan announced last night by President-elect Joe Biden.

The plan provides $35 billion in funding for two- and four-year public institutions, as well as, public and private Historically Black Colleges and Universities and other Minority Serving Institutions.

“The global coronavirus pandemic has indiscriminately impacted all sectors of our nation, including private, nonprofit higher education.  President-elect Joe Biden’s ambitious $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan, released last night, provides $35 billion in funding for two- and four-year public institutions, as well as, public and private Historically Black Colleges and Universities and other Minority Serving Institutions.”

“NAICU is very disappointed that the majority of the nation’s private, nonprofit colleges and universities were excluded from the Biden plan.  This awful virus does not distinguish among types of colleges and neither should our unified national fight against this disease. With more than 1,700 degree-granting private, nonprofit colleges and universities, located in all 50 states and in 391 congressional districts, private, nonprofit colleges enroll over 5.1 million students and provide more than 1.2 million administration, faculty and staff jobs to the economy.”

“Low income students, regardless of their college of choice, face the same daunting challenges during this time, including paying college expenses and covering their daily living expenses. Private, nonprofit and public colleges enroll similar percentages of students who are Pell Grant recipients: 38% at private, nonprofit four-year colleges compared to 40% at public institutions.”

“Colleges and universities, whether public or private, are facing significant challenges to their operations as the pandemic continues.  Increased expenses for online learning, COVID testing programs, enhanced cleaning and maintenance have stretched university budgets beyond the limit.”

“Most of the more than 1,700 private, nonprofit colleges and universities nationwide are critical economic drivers in their communities, often serving as the largest employer and source of economic and cultural activity.”

“Private, nonprofit colleges and universities are integral and irreplaceable parts of our society.  Their value is demonstrated across rural, suburban and urban communities across the country.  The entire nation is enduring this pandemic, now is not the time favor one sector over another.”

“We look forward to working with the new Administration to ensure we are all working together to combat this disease and to ensure our institutions and the students and communities we serve are partnering with them to help solve this challenge.”

Barbara K. Mistick, D.M.
President
National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU)


 

January 15, 2021

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NAICU

U.S. Rep. Ben Cline Recognized by America’s Independent Colleges and Universities

U.S. Rep. Ben Cline Recognized by America’s Independent Colleges an...

December 30, 2020

U.S. Representative Ben Cline (R-VA), a member of the Congressional Independent Colleges Caucus (CICC), was recognized today for his leadership and support of independent colleges and universities by Barbara K. Mistick, D.M., president of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). [See a video of the presentation]
 
“Rep. Ben Cline serves a rural district where a dozen private, nonprofit colleges and universities are the life blood of their communities,” Mistick said. “During his first term in Congress, he has demonstrated a keen understanding of how important each institution is as a social and economic driver to the cities and towns where they are located. We celebrate his keen interest and support for these private, nonprofit institutions.
 
Rep. Cline, a freshman member of the U.S. House of Representatives who won reelection in November, was presented with a framed replica of his CICC Member Spotlight by Mistick during a virtual meeting. Rep. Cline serves on the House Committee on Education and Labor, and the Committee on the Judiciary.
 
“Coming to Congress to represent the Sixth Congressional District of Virginia, I knew one of my policy focuses would be on education, particularly higher education, because I have the honor of representing over 20 colleges and universities in Virginia,” Rep. Cline said. “I also wanted to find areas on which I could reach across the aisle to work in a bipartisan manner, so this caucus is an excellent fit for me. I look forward to continuing to work with NAICU and fellow caucus members to empower independent colleges and universities across America.
 
Prior to his election to the House of Representatives in 2018, Rep. Cline was an attorney in private practice, served as an Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney for Rockingham County and the City of Harrisonburg, and served in the Virginia House of Delegates.  He also served as a legislative assistant and later chief of staff for retired Congressman Bob Goodlatte, who previously represented Virginia’s sixth Congressional District.  He earned a bachelor’s degree from Bates College (ME) and a law degree from the University of Richmond (VA).
 
“More than half of the higher education institutions in my Congressional District are private, nonprofit institutions,” Rep. Cline said. “These colleges play an invaluable role in preparing students to successfully enter the workforce and contribute to society.  In addition, many of these private colleges are some of the largest employers in their communities, and they help those areas remain economically successful.”
 
His district, located in the western region of Virginia, is home to 12 independent colleges and universities are located in the district, including: Bridgewater College, Centra College of Nursing, Eastern Mennonite University, Hollins University, Liberty University, Mary Baldwin University, Randolph University, Southern Virginia University, Sweet Briar College, University of Lynchburg, Virginia University of Lynchburg, and Washington & Lee University.  Virginia is home to more than 40 independent colleges and universities enrolling 135,000 students.
 
“I attended a private college for my undergraduate studies, and the experience allowed me to enjoy small class sizes, the opportunities to try new subjects, and the sense of community that helps students grow and learn,” he added.
 
William C. Dudley, Ph.D., president of Washington and Lee University, praised Rep. Cline’s understanding of the role the private colleges play in his district.
 
“Rep. Ben Cline has shown a willingness to listen when we have shared our concerns about the most pressing issues, especially on critical matters of cost and access. Because he represents a district with a dozen independent colleges and universities, Rep. Cline recognizes that the success of these institutions is integral to the growth and prosperity of the communities in his district.”
 
Reed N. Wilcox, president of Southern Virginia University, expressed gratitude for Rep. Cline’s assistance with navigating federal regulations.
 
"We at Southern Virginia University so appreciate the very thoughtful and skilled interest Congressman Ben Cline has shown in helping to further our mission as a four-year, faith-based, independent, liberal arts university,” Wilcox said. “We are particularly appreciative of his dedicated and insightful guidance and advocacy as he has helped us to navigate the uncertain waters of some of the federal agencies whose policies affect the success of Southern Virginia University and the lives of our students. We are most grateful for his kind help.”
Robert Lambeth, president of the Council of Independent Colleges in Virginia, recalled Rep. Cline’s private college education as a reason for his support.
 
“Private colleges are an integral part of the economic and higher education landscape in Virginia, and Congressman Cline’s district boasts one of the largest arrays of private institutions of any congressional district in the country,” said Lambeth. “He is a graduate of two outstanding private colleges and has personal knowledge of the important role private colleges play in our system of higher education.”
 
The Congressional Independent Colleges Caucus (CICC), launched in February 2017, offers Members of Congress an opportunity to both celebrate and advance the diversity of the nation’s independent colleges and universities, and learn about the challenges and issues these institutions face.  The Caucus, led by co-chairs Rep. Martha Roby (AL-2) and Rep. Derek Kilmer (WA-6), has grown to 88 members in the 116th Congress.
 
 
U.S. Representative Ben Cline (R-VA), a member of the Congressional Independent Colleges Caucus (CICC), was recognized today for his leadership and support of independent colleges and universities by Barbara K. Mistick, D.M., president of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). [See a video of the presentation]
 
“Rep. Ben Cline serves a rural district where a dozen private, nonprofit colleges and universities are the life blood of their communities,” Mistick said. “During his first term in Congress, he has demonstrated a keen understanding of how important each institution is as a social and economic driver to the cities and towns where they are located. We celebrate his keen interest and support for these private, nonprofit institutions.
 
Rep. Cline, a freshman member of the U.S. House of Representatives who won reelection in November, was presented with a framed replica of his CICC Member Spotlight by Mistick during a virtual meeting. Rep. Cline serves on the House Committee on Education and Labor, and the Committee on the Judiciary.
 
“Coming to Congress to represent the Sixth Congressional District of Virginia, I knew one of my policy focuses would be on education, particularly higher education, because I have the honor of representing over 20 colleges and universities in Virginia,” Rep. Cline said. “I also wanted to find areas on which I could reach across the aisle to work in a bipartisan manner, so this caucus is an excellent fit for me. I look forward to continuing to work with NAICU and fellow caucus members to empower independent colleges and universities across America.
 
Prior to his election to the House of Representatives in 2018, Rep. Cline was an attorney in private practice, served as an Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney for Rockingham County and the City of Harrisonburg, and served in the Virginia House of Delegates.  He also served as a legislative assistant and later chief of staff for retired Congressman Bob Goodlatte, who previously represented Virginia’s sixth Congressional District.  He earned a bachelor’s degree from Bates College (ME) and a law degree from the University of Richmond (VA).
 
“More than half of the higher education institutions in my Congressional District are private, nonprofit institutions,” Rep. Cline said. “These colleges play an invaluable role in preparing students to successfully enter the workforce and contribute to society.  In addition, many of these private colleges are some of the largest employers in their communities, and they help those areas remain economically successful.”
 
His district, located in the western region of Virginia, is home to 12 independent colleges and universities are located in the district, including: Bridgewater College, Centra College of Nursing, Eastern Mennonite University, Hollins University, Liberty University, Mary Baldwin University, Randolph University, Southern Virginia University, Sweet Briar College, University of Lynchburg, Virginia University of Lynchburg, and Washington & Lee University.  Virginia is home to more than 40 independent colleges and universities enrolling 135,000 students.
 
“I attended a private college for my undergraduate studies, and the experience allowed me to enjoy small class sizes, the opportunities to try new subjects, and the sense of community that helps students grow and learn,” he added.
 
William C. Dudley, Ph.D., president of Washington and Lee University, praised Rep. Cline’s understanding of the role the private colleges play in his district.
 
“Rep. Ben Cline has shown a willingness to listen when we have shared our concerns about the most pressing issues, especially on critical matters of cost and access. Because he represents a district with a dozen independent colleges and universities, Rep. Cline recognizes that the success of these institutions is integral to the growth and prosperity of the communities in his district.”
 
Reed N. Wilcox, president of Southern Virginia University, expressed gratitude for Rep. Cline’s assistance with navigating federal regulations.
 
"We at Southern Virginia University so appreciate the very thoughtful and skilled interest Congressman Ben Cline has shown in helping to further our mission as a four-year, faith-based, independent, liberal arts university,” Wilcox said. “We are particularly appreciative of his dedicated and insightful guidance and advocacy as he has helped us to navigate the uncertain waters of some of the federal agencies whose policies affect the success of Southern Virginia University and the lives of our students. We are most grateful for his kind help.”
Robert Lambeth, president of the Council of Independent Colleges in Virginia, recalled Rep. Cline’s private college education as a reason for his support.
 
“Private colleges are an integral part of the economic and higher education landscape in Virginia, and Congressman Cline’s district boasts one of the largest arrays of private institutions of any congressional district in the country,” said Lambeth. “He is a graduate of two outstanding private colleges and has personal knowledge of the important role private colleges play in our system of higher education.”
 
The Congressional Independent Colleges Caucus (CICC), launched in February 2017, offers Members of Congress an opportunity to both celebrate and advance the diversity of the nation’s independent colleges and universities, and learn about the challenges and issues these institutions face.  The Caucus, led by co-chairs Rep. Martha Roby (AL-2) and Rep. Derek Kilmer (WA-6), has grown to 88 members in the 116th Congress.
 
 

December 30, 2020

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Survey of Private, Nonprofit Colleges and Universities Shows 2 Percent Drop in Total Fall Enrollment

Survey of Private, Nonprofit Colleges and Universities Shows 2 Perc...

October 16, 2020


WASHINGTON, DC – The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) released the results of a national enrollment survey of 292 private, nonprofit colleges and universities showing the impact the COVID-19 pandemic is having on campuses across the country.
 
According to the survey, the sector experienced a 2% drop in total enrollment between the fall of 2019 and 2020, including a nearly 8% decrease among students who receive federal Pell Grant awards.
 
“College and university leaders have been remarkably resilient and creative in how they’ve responded to both the serious health implications the virus has imposed on campus and the need to adapt to continue educating their students in a safe environment,” said NAICU President Barbara K. Mistick, D.M.  “However, the data clearly demonstrate the significant impact the pandemic is having on students and families, especially those who are low-income.  Like other areas of the economy, this pandemic has hit lower-income families especially hard and higher education is no exception.”
 
Forty-three percent of private, nonprofit colleges and universities reported either no change or an increase in their 2020 fall enrollment compared to last year, while 57% reported a decrease in fall enrollment.
 
“Presidents in both the private and public sectors of higher education have had to make difficult personnel, financial, and programmatic decisions to ensure the stability of their campus communities,” said Mistick.  “Unfortunately, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, these decisions have included laying off or furloughing nearly 340,000 staff and faculty between February and August.  They also include making investments in Personal Protective Equipment and other health and safety equipment, technology and security upgrades, and much more.”
 
Detailed Findings
NOTE: These data are weighted by institution type and reflect the differences in enrollment between fall 2019 and fall 2020.
  • Total enrollment in the private, nonprofit higher education sector is down 2.4%
    • Undergraduate enrollment is down 4%
    • Graduate enrollment increased 1.3%
  • Full-time enrollment is down 2.5%
  • Part-time enrollment is down 2%
  • 42.9% of institutions report no change or an increase in enrollment
  • 57.1% of institutions report a decrease in enrollment
  • The median change in enrollment is -2.5% overall, with baccalaureate colleges having the largest typical decrease (-3.7%), followed by master’s colleges and universities (-3%), and doctoral universities (-1.9%)
  • The median change in undergraduate enrollment across all types of institutions is -3.7%, but the median change in graduate enrollment is +1%
 
Method of Instruction
Undergraduate Students
  • 72.8% of institutions are using a mix of in-person and remote learning to teach undergraduates this fall
  • 12% are exclusively in-person
  • 15.2% are exclusively online
 
Graduate Students
  • 66.9% of institutions are using a mixed approach
  • 4.7% are exclusively in-person
  • 28.4 are exclusively online
 
Methodology
Between September 10, 2020 and October 6, 2020 NAICU surveyed 956 private, nonprofit colleges and universities.  A total of 292 institutions submitted useable data, resulting in a 30.5% response rate. The sample was stratified by Carnegie classification types, including doctoral, master’s, baccalaureate, and specialized institutions. Weights were assigned to respondent institutions to reflect the universe of private, nonprofit colleges and universities. Enrollment definitions are identical to those used in the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) by the National Center for Education Statistics. Data on Pell Grant recipients are from institutional research or financial aid offices.
 

WASHINGTON, DC – The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) released the results of a national enrollment survey of 292 private, nonprofit colleges and universities showing the impact the COVID-19 pandemic is having on campuses across the country.
 
According to the survey, the sector experienced a 2% drop in total enrollment between the fall of 2019 and 2020, including a nearly 8% decrease among students who receive federal Pell Grant awards.
 
“College and university leaders have been remarkably resilient and creative in how they’ve responded to both the serious health implications the virus has imposed on campus and the need to adapt to continue educating their students in a safe environment,” said NAICU President Barbara K. Mistick, D.M.  “However, the data clearly demonstrate the significant impact the pandemic is having on students and families, especially those who are low-income.  Like other areas of the economy, this pandemic has hit lower-income families especially hard and higher education is no exception.”
 
Forty-three percent of private, nonprofit colleges and universities reported either no change or an increase in their 2020 fall enrollment compared to last year, while 57% reported a decrease in fall enrollment.
 
“Presidents in both the private and public sectors of higher education have had to make difficult personnel, financial, and programmatic decisions to ensure the stability of their campus communities,” said Mistick.  “Unfortunately, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, these decisions have included laying off or furloughing nearly 340,000 staff and faculty between February and August.  They also include making investments in Personal Protective Equipment and other health and safety equipment, technology and security upgrades, and much more.”
 
Detailed Findings
NOTE: These data are weighted by institution type and reflect the differences in enrollment between fall 2019 and fall 2020.
  • Total enrollment in the private, nonprofit higher education sector is down 2.4%
    • Undergraduate enrollment is down 4%
    • Graduate enrollment increased 1.3%
  • Full-time enrollment is down 2.5%
  • Part-time enrollment is down 2%
  • 42.9% of institutions report no change or an increase in enrollment
  • 57.1% of institutions report a decrease in enrollment
  • The median change in enrollment is -2.5% overall, with baccalaureate colleges having the largest typical decrease (-3.7%), followed by master’s colleges and universities (-3%), and doctoral universities (-1.9%)
  • The median change in undergraduate enrollment across all types of institutions is -3.7%, but the median change in graduate enrollment is +1%
 
Method of Instruction
Undergraduate Students
  • 72.8% of institutions are using a mix of in-person and remote learning to teach undergraduates this fall
  • 12% are exclusively in-person
  • 15.2% are exclusively online
 
Graduate Students
  • 66.9% of institutions are using a mixed approach
  • 4.7% are exclusively in-person
  • 28.4 are exclusively online
 
Methodology
Between September 10, 2020 and October 6, 2020 NAICU surveyed 956 private, nonprofit colleges and universities.  A total of 292 institutions submitted useable data, resulting in a 30.5% response rate. The sample was stratified by Carnegie classification types, including doctoral, master’s, baccalaureate, and specialized institutions. Weights were assigned to respondent institutions to reflect the universe of private, nonprofit colleges and universities. Enrollment definitions are identical to those used in the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) by the National Center for Education Statistics. Data on Pell Grant recipients are from institutional research or financial aid offices.
 

October 16, 2020

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Emmanual A. Guillory Joins NAICU as Director of Student and Institutional Aid Policy

Emmanual A. Guillory Joins NAICU as Director of Student and Institu...

August 14, 2020

The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) announced today that it has named Emmanual A. Guillory as director of student and institutional aid policy. Guillory joins NAICU after spending the past two years as the director of public policy and government affairs at UNCF (United Negro College Fund, Inc.).
 
“We are pleased to welcome Emmanual to NAICU’s team of government relations experts,” said NAICU President Barbara K. Mistick, D.M. “His experiences at UNCF, which is a member of NAICU, and on Capitol Hill allows him to step right into the student aid policy arena and continue to provide in-depth analysis and strategy that is so important to our members and the students they serve.”
 
As director of student and institutional aid policy, Guillory will be the lead policy expert on Title IV federal student assistance programs and institutional aid programs found in Titles III and V of the Higher Education Act (HEA). He will be responsible for developing NAICU’s policy positions on student and institutional aid, in conjunction with the association’s member college, university, and association presidents. Guillory will also represent those positions and NAICU’s viewpoints to Congress, the White House, the Department of Education, and other agencies as warranted.
 
“NAICU, like UNCF, is dedicated to ensuring that all students have access to the college or university that best meets their needs, especially low-income and first-generation students,” said Guillory. “I am excited to bring my experience with institutional aid to NAICU, which is critical to ensuring that qualifying institutions, such as HBCUs and Minority-Serving Institutions, receive equitable funding to better serve students. Being a person who is a first-generation college student from humble beginnings, I know the importance of financing an education all too well, and look forward to focusing on federal student aid, which is so important to ensuring that students are able to fulfill their educational aspirations. Public service and advocacy have always been important to me, and I’m drawn to the opportunity to continue serving as a voice and advocate for policies that positively impact students, families, and under-resourced institutions while also promoting the importance of private, nonprofit higher education.”
 
In his role at UNCF, Guillory served as a primary advocate on the organization’s education policy agenda in the U.S. Congress and the Executive Branch. His focus was on federal postsecondary education policy, legislation, and regulatory issues. Guillory also served as UNCF’s lead analyst of education policies, legislation, and regulations to assess the impact on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and on educational opportunities for underrepresented students.
 
Prior to joining UNCF, Guillory served in several roles while working in the U.S. House of Representatives for nearly 10 years. Most recently, he was a professional staff member for the House Committee on Education and the Workforce where he served as the lead staff member on borrower defense regulations, gainful employment, college access programs, cash management regulations, and all of Titles III, V, VI, and VII of the HEA. Additionally, having worked to reauthorize the HEA, Guillory is intimately familiar with the law and its provisions.
 
Prior to his committee work, Guillory served in many roles for then-Rep. Joe Barton (R-TX), most recently as the senior policy advisor. He began his public policy work as an intern in Rep. Bob Latta’s (R-OH) district office in Bowling Green, OH.
 
“Emmanual has been a friend to and colleague of NAICU for several years. We have worked side-by-side in our shared pursuits of advocating on behalf of our members and students,” said Sarah Flanagan, NAICU’s vice president for government relations and policy development. “He brings a depth of experience, creativity, and energy that will be felt across the association and will benefit our entire membership.”
 
Guillory, who will begin in his new position on August 24, earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology and a professional certificate in Leadership Studies from Texas A&M University in College Station, TX. Following Texas A&M, he earned a Master of Arts degree in College Student Personnel (Higher Education Administration) from Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, OH.
The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) announced today that it has named Emmanual A. Guillory as director of student and institutional aid policy. Guillory joins NAICU after spending the past two years as the director of public policy and government affairs at UNCF (United Negro College Fund, Inc.).
 
“We are pleased to welcome Emmanual to NAICU’s team of government relations experts,” said NAICU President Barbara K. Mistick, D.M. “His experiences at UNCF, which is a member of NAICU, and on Capitol Hill allows him to step right into the student aid policy arena and continue to provide in-depth analysis and strategy that is so important to our members and the students they serve.”
 
As director of student and institutional aid policy, Guillory will be the lead policy expert on Title IV federal student assistance programs and institutional aid programs found in Titles III and V of the Higher Education Act (HEA). He will be responsible for developing NAICU’s policy positions on student and institutional aid, in conjunction with the association’s member college, university, and association presidents. Guillory will also represent those positions and NAICU’s viewpoints to Congress, the White House, the Department of Education, and other agencies as warranted.
 
“NAICU, like UNCF, is dedicated to ensuring that all students have access to the college or university that best meets their needs, especially low-income and first-generation students,” said Guillory. “I am excited to bring my experience with institutional aid to NAICU, which is critical to ensuring that qualifying institutions, such as HBCUs and Minority-Serving Institutions, receive equitable funding to better serve students. Being a person who is a first-generation college student from humble beginnings, I know the importance of financing an education all too well, and look forward to focusing on federal student aid, which is so important to ensuring that students are able to fulfill their educational aspirations. Public service and advocacy have always been important to me, and I’m drawn to the opportunity to continue serving as a voice and advocate for policies that positively impact students, families, and under-resourced institutions while also promoting the importance of private, nonprofit higher education.”
 
In his role at UNCF, Guillory served as a primary advocate on the organization’s education policy agenda in the U.S. Congress and the Executive Branch. His focus was on federal postsecondary education policy, legislation, and regulatory issues. Guillory also served as UNCF’s lead analyst of education policies, legislation, and regulations to assess the impact on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and on educational opportunities for underrepresented students.
 
Prior to joining UNCF, Guillory served in several roles while working in the U.S. House of Representatives for nearly 10 years. Most recently, he was a professional staff member for the House Committee on Education and the Workforce where he served as the lead staff member on borrower defense regulations, gainful employment, college access programs, cash management regulations, and all of Titles III, V, VI, and VII of the HEA. Additionally, having worked to reauthorize the HEA, Guillory is intimately familiar with the law and its provisions.
 
Prior to his committee work, Guillory served in many roles for then-Rep. Joe Barton (R-TX), most recently as the senior policy advisor. He began his public policy work as an intern in Rep. Bob Latta’s (R-OH) district office in Bowling Green, OH.
 
“Emmanual has been a friend to and colleague of NAICU for several years. We have worked side-by-side in our shared pursuits of advocating on behalf of our members and students,” said Sarah Flanagan, NAICU’s vice president for government relations and policy development. “He brings a depth of experience, creativity, and energy that will be felt across the association and will benefit our entire membership.”
 
Guillory, who will begin in his new position on August 24, earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology and a professional certificate in Leadership Studies from Texas A&M University in College Station, TX. Following Texas A&M, he earned a Master of Arts degree in College Student Personnel (Higher Education Administration) from Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, OH.

August 14, 2020

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Statement from NAICU President Barbara Mistick, D.M. on New Temporary Rule Affecting International Students

Statement from NAICU President Barbara Mistick, D.M. on New Tempora...

July 07, 2020

Yesterday the U.S. Department of Homeland Security issued a new temporary final rule, prohibiting international students from staying in the United States if they are enrolled in an American college or university that implements an online-only platform for instruction. This guidance also applies to an institution that moves to exclusively online midsemester in response to rising COVID-19 cases on campus, and to students who are living on campuses that are open, but offering classes online only to protect the health and safety of their faculty and campus community.

NAICU President Barbara Mistick, D.M. issued the following statement:

“This policy is not only extremely punitive to international students, it also threatens the safety of other students and the communities surrounding college campuses. It is the exact opposite of what the higher education community, including NAICU, recommended last week to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Secretary of Homeland Security Chad Wolf requesting extended flexibility for international students."

"This move doesn’t appear to be very well-thought out. The new policy puts undo pressure on campuses to stay open when it is unsafe to do so. Transporting international students who may have been exposed to the coronavirus to other campuses (which would be the only way they could remain in the country to continue their education), or to airports to fly back to their home countries, assuming those countries are allowing flights from the United States, pose a myriad of health risks."

"Congress should take immediate action to help roll back this unnecessary and harmful rule.”
Yesterday the U.S. Department of Homeland Security issued a new temporary final rule, prohibiting international students from staying in the United States if they are enrolled in an American college or university that implements an online-only platform for instruction. This guidance also applies to an institution that moves to exclusively online midsemester in response to rising COVID-19 cases on campus, and to students who are living on campuses that are open, but offering classes online only to protect the health and safety of their faculty and campus community.

NAICU President Barbara Mistick, D.M. issued the following statement:

“This policy is not only extremely punitive to international students, it also threatens the safety of other students and the communities surrounding college campuses. It is the exact opposite of what the higher education community, including NAICU, recommended last week to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Secretary of Homeland Security Chad Wolf requesting extended flexibility for international students."

"This move doesn’t appear to be very well-thought out. The new policy puts undo pressure on campuses to stay open when it is unsafe to do so. Transporting international students who may have been exposed to the coronavirus to other campuses (which would be the only way they could remain in the country to continue their education), or to airports to fly back to their home countries, assuming those countries are allowing flights from the United States, pose a myriad of health risks."

"Congress should take immediate action to help roll back this unnecessary and harmful rule.”

July 07, 2020

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About the items posted on the NAICU site: News items, features, and opinion pieces posted on this site from sources outside NAICU do not necessarily reflect the position of the association or its members. Rather, this content reflects the diversity of issues and views that are shaping American higher education.

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