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NAICU Joins Nearly 1,200 Organizations and Institutions Calling on Congress to Double the Maximum Pell Grant

NAICU Joins Nearly 1,200 Organizations and Institutions Calling on ...

March 25, 2021

Today, NAICU joined nearly 1,200 organizations, colleges and universities in calling on Congress to double the Pell Grant maximum award. Below is a statement from NAICU President Barbara K. Mistick, D.M.

“Doubling the Pell Grant maximum award is one of NAICU’s top policy priorities. I am pleased today that NAICU has joined with more than 300 organizations and nearly 900 individual colleges and universities to urge Congress to bring an affordable, high-quality college education within reach for all students by doubling the Pell Grant maximum award.

“Currently, there are more than 1.1 million students at private, nonprofit colleges and universities who receive Pell Grants each year.  This support provides nearly $5 billion to help them attend and complete college.

“This call to double the Pell Grant is the single most important step Congress can take to make college more accessible for low-income and first generation students. The goal to double Pell, described as “long overdue” in the letter, clearly has the backing of the higher education community, as evidenced by the support demonstrated in today’s letter.

“This important investment will drive economic recovery, help address racial and economic inequities in college completion rates, and increase overall educational attainment. Doubling the Pell Grant maximum award is something Congress can agree to on a bipartisan basis as a fast and effective way to bolster opportunity for millions of students.

“We look forward to working with members of the House and Senate from both parties and the Biden Administration to enact this important public policy initiative.”
Today, NAICU joined nearly 1,200 organizations, colleges and universities in calling on Congress to double the Pell Grant maximum award. Below is a statement from NAICU President Barbara K. Mistick, D.M.

“Doubling the Pell Grant maximum award is one of NAICU’s top policy priorities. I am pleased today that NAICU has joined with more than 300 organizations and nearly 900 individual colleges and universities to urge Congress to bring an affordable, high-quality college education within reach for all students by doubling the Pell Grant maximum award.

“Currently, there are more than 1.1 million students at private, nonprofit colleges and universities who receive Pell Grants each year.  This support provides nearly $5 billion to help them attend and complete college.

“This call to double the Pell Grant is the single most important step Congress can take to make college more accessible for low-income and first generation students. The goal to double Pell, described as “long overdue” in the letter, clearly has the backing of the higher education community, as evidenced by the support demonstrated in today’s letter.

“This important investment will drive economic recovery, help address racial and economic inequities in college completion rates, and increase overall educational attainment. Doubling the Pell Grant maximum award is something Congress can agree to on a bipartisan basis as a fast and effective way to bolster opportunity for millions of students.

“We look forward to working with members of the House and Senate from both parties and the Biden Administration to enact this important public policy initiative.”

March 25, 2021

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NAICU News

Statement on Approval of the American Rescue Plan

Statement on Approval of the American Rescue Plan

March 10, 2021

Today, the House of Representatives approved the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan, which will now go to President Biden for his signature. The president is expected to formally sign the bill later this week.  The legislation includes nearly $40 billion for higher education.
 
The following is a statement from NAICU President Barbara Mistick, D.M.
 
“Today marks another important milestone in our nation’s efforts to overcome the significant challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic.  All Americans and all sectors of the American economy have been affected by this crisis. 
 
“The approval of this legislation in the House of Representatives, which includes $40 billion for higher education, brings much needed relief to college students and their families.  It also provides important resources to colleges and universities to help those institutions to remain open, safely and effectively educate their students, and ensure the health and safety of their campus communities.
 
“On behalf of the 1,700 private, nonprofit colleges and universities, we are appreciative to have been included in the American Rescue Plan, as well as the two previous relief packages passed last year.  However, while this support is significant, it does not signal the end of the crisis nor does it cover the $183 billion in losses the Association of Governing Boards reports the higher education sector has suffered as a result of the pandemic.
 
“Colleges and universities have been – and will continue – playing a leading role in helping their communities overcome the challenges posed by the pandemic.  We look forward to our continued work with both parties in Congress and the Biden Administration to ensure that we emerge from this crisis as strong and vibrant as ever.”
Today, the House of Representatives approved the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan, which will now go to President Biden for his signature. The president is expected to formally sign the bill later this week.  The legislation includes nearly $40 billion for higher education.
 
The following is a statement from NAICU President Barbara Mistick, D.M.
 
“Today marks another important milestone in our nation’s efforts to overcome the significant challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic.  All Americans and all sectors of the American economy have been affected by this crisis. 
 
“The approval of this legislation in the House of Representatives, which includes $40 billion for higher education, brings much needed relief to college students and their families.  It also provides important resources to colleges and universities to help those institutions to remain open, safely and effectively educate their students, and ensure the health and safety of their campus communities.
 
“On behalf of the 1,700 private, nonprofit colleges and universities, we are appreciative to have been included in the American Rescue Plan, as well as the two previous relief packages passed last year.  However, while this support is significant, it does not signal the end of the crisis nor does it cover the $183 billion in losses the Association of Governing Boards reports the higher education sector has suffered as a result of the pandemic.
 
“Colleges and universities have been – and will continue – playing a leading role in helping their communities overcome the challenges posed by the pandemic.  We look forward to our continued work with both parties in Congress and the Biden Administration to ensure that we emerge from this crisis as strong and vibrant as ever.”

March 10, 2021

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NAICU News

Statement on the Confirmation of Miguel Cardona as the Next Secretary of Education

Statement on the Confirmation of Miguel Cardona as the Next Secreta...

March 01, 2021

Today, the U.S. Senate voted to confirm Miguel Cardona, Connecticut’s education commissioner, to be the next Secretary of Education. With strong bipartisan support, the Senate reinforced its commitment to education at all levels.  NAICU President Barbara Mistick, D.M. released the following statement:
 
“As a former elementary school teacher, principal, and now the education commissioner for the state of Connecticut, new Education Secretary Miguel Cardona has seen the transformative effect education can have on students, families, and communities.
 
“Our Connecticut member presidents speak very highly of the work Secretary Cardona has led in the state on college access and success.  They also point to his leadership throughout the COVID-19 pandemic in working to safely re-open schools.
 
“Education can be the great equalizer.  But we must ensure that students have the access they need to be successful, graduate and, eventually, move up the economic ladder.  We look forward to working with Secretary Cardona on issues such as the recovery for our students, their families and our institutions of higher education from the pandemic, college access and success for low-income and first generation students, strengthening federal financial aid, appropriate accountability, and the importance of the diversity of American higher education (among many other pressing issues). 
 
“We also look forward to working together to help ensure that colleges and universities have the tools and resources to safely keep campuses open full time and that students, faculty, and staff have the resources, including mental health resources, to continue their efforts.
 
“There will be challenges and difficult conversations ahead for all who are involved in education.  Secretary Cardona’s lifetime commitment to education will serve our students and institutions well during his tenure.
 
“While his career has been spent at the secondary education levels, Secretary Cardona and the Administration have assembled an excellent higher education team.  James Kvaal’s nomination as Undersecretary of Education and Michelle Asha Cooper’s appointment as deputy assistant secretary, Office of Postsecondary Education are sound choices who will both be strong advocates for higher education.  Both have a deep background in higher education policy that they will bring to the Education Department. We have worked with both James and Michelle in their previous positions and look forward to engaging with them again as they settle in to their new positions.”
Today, the U.S. Senate voted to confirm Miguel Cardona, Connecticut’s education commissioner, to be the next Secretary of Education. With strong bipartisan support, the Senate reinforced its commitment to education at all levels.  NAICU President Barbara Mistick, D.M. released the following statement:
 
“As a former elementary school teacher, principal, and now the education commissioner for the state of Connecticut, new Education Secretary Miguel Cardona has seen the transformative effect education can have on students, families, and communities.
 
“Our Connecticut member presidents speak very highly of the work Secretary Cardona has led in the state on college access and success.  They also point to his leadership throughout the COVID-19 pandemic in working to safely re-open schools.
 
“Education can be the great equalizer.  But we must ensure that students have the access they need to be successful, graduate and, eventually, move up the economic ladder.  We look forward to working with Secretary Cardona on issues such as the recovery for our students, their families and our institutions of higher education from the pandemic, college access and success for low-income and first generation students, strengthening federal financial aid, appropriate accountability, and the importance of the diversity of American higher education (among many other pressing issues). 
 
“We also look forward to working together to help ensure that colleges and universities have the tools and resources to safely keep campuses open full time and that students, faculty, and staff have the resources, including mental health resources, to continue their efforts.
 
“There will be challenges and difficult conversations ahead for all who are involved in education.  Secretary Cardona’s lifetime commitment to education will serve our students and institutions well during his tenure.
 
“While his career has been spent at the secondary education levels, Secretary Cardona and the Administration have assembled an excellent higher education team.  James Kvaal’s nomination as Undersecretary of Education and Michelle Asha Cooper’s appointment as deputy assistant secretary, Office of Postsecondary Education are sound choices who will both be strong advocates for higher education.  Both have a deep background in higher education policy that they will bring to the Education Department. We have worked with both James and Michelle in their previous positions and look forward to engaging with them again as they settle in to their new positions.”

March 01, 2021

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NAICU News

University of Puget Sound President Isiaah Crawford Elected Chair of NAICU Board of Directors

University of Puget Sound President Isiaah Crawford Elected Chair o...

February 11, 2021

Isiaah Crawford, Ph.D., president of the University of Puget Sound (WA), has been elected chair of the Board of Directors for the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU).  Crawford leads a list of four new board officers and 14 new board members who will take office on July 1, 2021. Their election was ratified during the Association’s virtual 2021 Annual Meeting and Advocacy Day.
 
NAICU board members set the Association’s agenda on federal higher education policy, actively encourage support for the Association’s priorities and initiatives, and oversee the organization’s financial administration.  Board members serve three-year terms, while officers serve one-year terms.
 
“Isiaah Crawford possesses a deep commitment to private higher education and an insightful view of the political environment in Washington,” said NAICU President Barbara K. Mistick, D.M.  “As president of the University of Puget Sound, he has helped focus the university community on a student-centered approach to learning designed to provide students with a meaningful, relevant, accessible, and distinctive education.”
 
“At a time when private, nonprofit colleges and universities face many pressing issues, I am honored to have been selected to serve in this key leadership position,” Crawford said.  “Our advocacy focus moving forward will be on securing COVID financial relief for our institutions and our students, increasing federal student aid, including doubling the maximum Pell Grant awards, among many other issues.  NAICU’s work in Washington, DC, has wide-ranging implications for campuses across the country.  I look forward to working with the NAICU team and member presidents to achieve our goals.”
 
NAICU serves as the national voice of independent higher education and reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  Member institutions include major research universities, church-related colleges, historically black colleges, art and design colleges, traditional liberal arts and science institutions, women’s colleges, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.
 
Crawford will succeed Roger N. Casey, Ph.D., president of McDaniel College (MD), who will remain on the board as immediate past chair.
 
 
Crawford Background
 
A distinguished scholar, teacher, and college administrator, Crawford became president of University of Puget Sound on July 1, 2016. Crawford’s academic work and achievements as a senior administrator are closely aligned with the values and aspirations of Puget Sound, and with the key areas of challenge and opportunity facing higher education today.
 
Crawford came to Puget Sound following service as provost and chief academic officer of Seattle University (2008–16), where he directed the Division of Academic Affairs and oversaw the university’s schools and colleges, libraries, enrollment, information technology, institutional research, and offices supporting student academic achievement, faculty affairs, and global engagement.  From 2004 to 2008, Crawford was dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Loyola University Chicago, where he joined the faculty of the Department of Psychology in 1987.
 
Crawford earned a bachelor's degree in psychology from St. Louis University (MO), and master’s and doctoral degrees in clinical psychology from DePaul University (IL). He is a distinguished clinician, educator and well-published scholar in the areas of health promotion, human sexuality and the training of mental health professionals.  He is the recipient of numerous national awards, including three from the American Psychological Association.
 
He serves on the board of directors for The Annapolis Group, Independent Colleges of Washington, and the Northwest Conference, as well as the Tacoma Art Museum, Seattle Symphony, Providence St. Joseph Health, and Providence Health Plan.  [Crawford’s complete bio]
 
Other New Board Officers
 
Three other individuals were elected as Board officers, serving one-year terms expiring in June 2022:
  • Eric F. Spina, Ph.D., president of the University of Dayton, in Dayton, OH, will serve as Vice Chair of the board.  He is in line to assume the position of board chair in July 2022.
  • Stephen R. Briggs, Ph.D., president of Berry College in Mount Berry, GA, will serve as Treasurer.
  • Sherilyn R. Emberton, Ed.D., president of Huntington University in Huntington, IN, will serve as Secretary.
At the same time, five board members have been appointed as chairs of the Association’s standing committees on policy and programs and will join the officers as members of NAICU’s Executive Committee:
 
  • Lillian Schumacher, Ed.D, president of Tiffin University in Tiffin, OH, will serve as chair of the Audit Committee.
  • Ann McElaney-Johnson, Ph.D., president of Mount Saint Mary’s University in Los Angeles, CA, will chair the Committee on Accountability.
  • Kenneth Macur, Ph.D., president of Medaille College in Buffalo, NY, will serve as chair of the Committee on Policy Analysis & Public Relations.
  • Douglas J. Fiore, Ph.D., president of Mercy College of Health Sciences in Des Moines, IA, will be chair of the Committee on Student Aid.
  • Eric I. Bruntmyer, president of Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene, TX, will serve as chair of the Committee on Tax Policy.
Two other board members, representing allied organizations also will serve on the Executive Committee:
  • Terri Standish-Kuon, Ph.D., president of the Independent Colleges of Washington in Seattle, WA, will represent the National Association of Independent Colleges and University State Executives, whose members lead the state associations of private, nonprofit colleges and universities in 40 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.
  • David O’Bryon, J.D., CAE, president of the Association of Chiropractic Colleges in Bethesda, MD, will represent the NAICU Secretariat.  The Secretariat consists of 29 member associations representing the many regional and special-purpose independent colleges and universities across the country.
New NAICU Board Members
 
Eight individuals were elected to three-year terms ending in June 2024, representing the Association’s eight national regions:
  • Susan Stuebner, Ed.D., president of Colby-Sawyer College in New London, NH, will represent Region I (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont).
  • Gregory G. Dell’Omo, Ph.D., president of Rider University in Lawrenceville, NJ, will represent Region II (Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, and New York). 
  • Burton J. Webb, Ph.D., president of the University of Pikeville in Pikeville, KY, will represent Region III (Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia)
  • Krista L. Newkirk, J.D., president of Converse College in Spartanville, SC, will represent Region IV (Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia).
  • John Y. Walz, Ph.D., president of the Milwaukee School of Engineering in Milwaukee, WI, will represent Region V (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin).
  • R. Thomas “Tommy” King, Ed.D., president of William Carey University in Hattiesburg, MS, will represent Region VI (Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas).
  • Paul C. Pribbenow, Ph.D., president of Augsburg University in Minneapolis, MN, will represent Region VII (Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota).
  • Kah-Jin Jeffrey Kuan, Ph.D., president of Claremont School of Theology in Claremont, CA, will represent Region VIII (Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado., Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming).
Four additional individuals were named to three-year terms as at-large board members with terms ending in June 2024:
  • Irma Becerra, Ph.D., president of Marymount University in Arlington, VA.
  • Henry J. Eyring, J.D., president of Brigham Young University-Idaho in Rexburg, ID
  • Wayne A.I. Frederick, M.D. MBA, F.A.C.S., president of Howard University in Washington, DC
  • Mary Dana Hinton, Ph.D., president of Hollins University on Roanoke, VA.
In addition, three others have been appointed to the board: 
  • Douglas J. Fiore, Ph.D., president of Mercy College of Health Sciences in Des Moines, IA, will serve out the remaining one-year term ending June 30, 2022 created by the resignation of Helen Streubert, president of Saint Elizabeth University in Morristown, NJ.
  • Leslie Ford Weber, director of Government & Community Affairs, Montgomery County, and Federal Strategy at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD, will serve as an ad-hoc non-voting government relations representative until 2024.
  • L. Jeffrey Perez, president & CEO, South Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities in Columbia, SC, will serve as a voting NAICUSE representative unitl 2024.
 
 
Isiaah Crawford, Ph.D., president of the University of Puget Sound (WA), has been elected chair of the Board of Directors for the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU).  Crawford leads a list of four new board officers and 14 new board members who will take office on July 1, 2021. Their election was ratified during the Association’s virtual 2021 Annual Meeting and Advocacy Day.
 
NAICU board members set the Association’s agenda on federal higher education policy, actively encourage support for the Association’s priorities and initiatives, and oversee the organization’s financial administration.  Board members serve three-year terms, while officers serve one-year terms.
 
“Isiaah Crawford possesses a deep commitment to private higher education and an insightful view of the political environment in Washington,” said NAICU President Barbara K. Mistick, D.M.  “As president of the University of Puget Sound, he has helped focus the university community on a student-centered approach to learning designed to provide students with a meaningful, relevant, accessible, and distinctive education.”
 
“At a time when private, nonprofit colleges and universities face many pressing issues, I am honored to have been selected to serve in this key leadership position,” Crawford said.  “Our advocacy focus moving forward will be on securing COVID financial relief for our institutions and our students, increasing federal student aid, including doubling the maximum Pell Grant awards, among many other issues.  NAICU’s work in Washington, DC, has wide-ranging implications for campuses across the country.  I look forward to working with the NAICU team and member presidents to achieve our goals.”
 
NAICU serves as the national voice of independent higher education and reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  Member institutions include major research universities, church-related colleges, historically black colleges, art and design colleges, traditional liberal arts and science institutions, women’s colleges, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.
 
Crawford will succeed Roger N. Casey, Ph.D., president of McDaniel College (MD), who will remain on the board as immediate past chair.
 
 
Crawford Background
 
A distinguished scholar, teacher, and college administrator, Crawford became president of University of Puget Sound on July 1, 2016. Crawford’s academic work and achievements as a senior administrator are closely aligned with the values and aspirations of Puget Sound, and with the key areas of challenge and opportunity facing higher education today.
 
Crawford came to Puget Sound following service as provost and chief academic officer of Seattle University (2008–16), where he directed the Division of Academic Affairs and oversaw the university’s schools and colleges, libraries, enrollment, information technology, institutional research, and offices supporting student academic achievement, faculty affairs, and global engagement.  From 2004 to 2008, Crawford was dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Loyola University Chicago, where he joined the faculty of the Department of Psychology in 1987.
 
Crawford earned a bachelor's degree in psychology from St. Louis University (MO), and master’s and doctoral degrees in clinical psychology from DePaul University (IL). He is a distinguished clinician, educator and well-published scholar in the areas of health promotion, human sexuality and the training of mental health professionals.  He is the recipient of numerous national awards, including three from the American Psychological Association.
 
He serves on the board of directors for The Annapolis Group, Independent Colleges of Washington, and the Northwest Conference, as well as the Tacoma Art Museum, Seattle Symphony, Providence St. Joseph Health, and Providence Health Plan.  [Crawford’s complete bio]
 
Other New Board Officers
 
Three other individuals were elected as Board officers, serving one-year terms expiring in June 2022:
  • Eric F. Spina, Ph.D., president of the University of Dayton, in Dayton, OH, will serve as Vice Chair of the board.  He is in line to assume the position of board chair in July 2022.
  • Stephen R. Briggs, Ph.D., president of Berry College in Mount Berry, GA, will serve as Treasurer.
  • Sherilyn R. Emberton, Ed.D., president of Huntington University in Huntington, IN, will serve as Secretary.
At the same time, five board members have been appointed as chairs of the Association’s standing committees on policy and programs and will join the officers as members of NAICU’s Executive Committee:
 
  • Lillian Schumacher, Ed.D, president of Tiffin University in Tiffin, OH, will serve as chair of the Audit Committee.
  • Ann McElaney-Johnson, Ph.D., president of Mount Saint Mary’s University in Los Angeles, CA, will chair the Committee on Accountability.
  • Kenneth Macur, Ph.D., president of Medaille College in Buffalo, NY, will serve as chair of the Committee on Policy Analysis & Public Relations.
  • Douglas J. Fiore, Ph.D., president of Mercy College of Health Sciences in Des Moines, IA, will be chair of the Committee on Student Aid.
  • Eric I. Bruntmyer, president of Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene, TX, will serve as chair of the Committee on Tax Policy.
Two other board members, representing allied organizations also will serve on the Executive Committee:
  • Terri Standish-Kuon, Ph.D., president of the Independent Colleges of Washington in Seattle, WA, will represent the National Association of Independent Colleges and University State Executives, whose members lead the state associations of private, nonprofit colleges and universities in 40 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.
  • David O’Bryon, J.D., CAE, president of the Association of Chiropractic Colleges in Bethesda, MD, will represent the NAICU Secretariat.  The Secretariat consists of 29 member associations representing the many regional and special-purpose independent colleges and universities across the country.
New NAICU Board Members
 
Eight individuals were elected to three-year terms ending in June 2024, representing the Association’s eight national regions:
  • Susan Stuebner, Ed.D., president of Colby-Sawyer College in New London, NH, will represent Region I (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont).
  • Gregory G. Dell’Omo, Ph.D., president of Rider University in Lawrenceville, NJ, will represent Region II (Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, and New York). 
  • Burton J. Webb, Ph.D., president of the University of Pikeville in Pikeville, KY, will represent Region III (Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia)
  • Krista L. Newkirk, J.D., president of Converse College in Spartanville, SC, will represent Region IV (Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia).
  • John Y. Walz, Ph.D., president of the Milwaukee School of Engineering in Milwaukee, WI, will represent Region V (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin).
  • R. Thomas “Tommy” King, Ed.D., president of William Carey University in Hattiesburg, MS, will represent Region VI (Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas).
  • Paul C. Pribbenow, Ph.D., president of Augsburg University in Minneapolis, MN, will represent Region VII (Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota).
  • Kah-Jin Jeffrey Kuan, Ph.D., president of Claremont School of Theology in Claremont, CA, will represent Region VIII (Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado., Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming).
Four additional individuals were named to three-year terms as at-large board members with terms ending in June 2024:
  • Irma Becerra, Ph.D., president of Marymount University in Arlington, VA.
  • Henry J. Eyring, J.D., president of Brigham Young University-Idaho in Rexburg, ID
  • Wayne A.I. Frederick, M.D. MBA, F.A.C.S., president of Howard University in Washington, DC
  • Mary Dana Hinton, Ph.D., president of Hollins University on Roanoke, VA.
In addition, three others have been appointed to the board: 
  • Douglas J. Fiore, Ph.D., president of Mercy College of Health Sciences in Des Moines, IA, will serve out the remaining one-year term ending June 30, 2022 created by the resignation of Helen Streubert, president of Saint Elizabeth University in Morristown, NJ.
  • Leslie Ford Weber, director of Government & Community Affairs, Montgomery County, and Federal Strategy at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD, will serve as an ad-hoc non-voting government relations representative until 2024.
  • L. Jeffrey Perez, president & CEO, South Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities in Columbia, SC, will serve as a voting NAICUSE representative unitl 2024.
 
 

February 11, 2021

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Statement from NAICU President Barbara Mistick, D.M. on New COVID Relief Funding

Statement from NAICU President Barbara Mistick, D.M. on New COVID R...

February 10, 2021

This week, nearly 600 private, nonprofit higher education presidents and senior leaders have gathered virtually for NAICU’s 2021 Annual Meeting and Advocacy Day.  As Congress debates much-needed COVID relief funding, considers the nomination of Education Secretary Miguel Cardona, and tackles other key higher education priorities, NAICU members are meeting in record numbers with their federal elected leaders.
 
The following is a statement from NAICU President Barbara Mistick, D.M. on the importance of continued COVID-related federal funding relief for private, nonprofit colleges and universities.
 
“During the course of the next two days, NAICU member presidents and state leaders will be meeting with over 250 members of the House and nearly 80 Senators.  These meetings come at a critical time.  Today, the House Committee on Education and Labor will mark up a COVID relief bill that provides $40 billion for higher education, including all private, nonprofit colleges.  This is significant funding, along with the previous relief provided by Congress last year.  However, it does not come close to meeting the needs of colleges and universities.  According to data from the Association of Governing Boards, the higher education sector has suffered $183 billion in losses as a result of the pandemic.
 
“We appreciate that Congress has included the 1,700 private, nonprofit colleges and universities and the more than 5 million students who attend those institutions in this next round of critical COVID relief funding.  This awful virus does not distinguish among types of colleges and we are glad Congress is treating the nation’s public and private colleges and universities, and their students and communities, equally, as it did in the two previous relief packages. 
 
“Private, nonprofit colleges and universities, which are playing important roles in leading the nation’s recovery from the pandemic, are committed to ensuring their students, faculty, and staff are teaching and learning in safe, secure, and healthy environments.
 
“As colleges continue to work with their local communities and regions to help overcome the challenges presented by the pandemic, we look forward to discussing these issues over the next two days and working with Congress on this critical funding as the legislation moves through the House and Senate committees to a final passage in the weeks to come.”
 
#   #   # 
 
NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education and reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the U.S.  Our member institutions include major research universities, faith-based colleges, historically black colleges and universities, minority-serving institutions, art and design colleges, traditional liberal arts and science institutions, women’s colleges, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.  With more than 5 million students attending 1,700 independent colleges and universities in all 50 states, and more than 1 million employees, the private sector of American higher education has a dramatic impact on our nation’s larger public interests.
 
This week, nearly 600 private, nonprofit higher education presidents and senior leaders have gathered virtually for NAICU’s 2021 Annual Meeting and Advocacy Day.  As Congress debates much-needed COVID relief funding, considers the nomination of Education Secretary Miguel Cardona, and tackles other key higher education priorities, NAICU members are meeting in record numbers with their federal elected leaders.
 
The following is a statement from NAICU President Barbara Mistick, D.M. on the importance of continued COVID-related federal funding relief for private, nonprofit colleges and universities.
 
“During the course of the next two days, NAICU member presidents and state leaders will be meeting with over 250 members of the House and nearly 80 Senators.  These meetings come at a critical time.  Today, the House Committee on Education and Labor will mark up a COVID relief bill that provides $40 billion for higher education, including all private, nonprofit colleges.  This is significant funding, along with the previous relief provided by Congress last year.  However, it does not come close to meeting the needs of colleges and universities.  According to data from the Association of Governing Boards, the higher education sector has suffered $183 billion in losses as a result of the pandemic.
 
“We appreciate that Congress has included the 1,700 private, nonprofit colleges and universities and the more than 5 million students who attend those institutions in this next round of critical COVID relief funding.  This awful virus does not distinguish among types of colleges and we are glad Congress is treating the nation’s public and private colleges and universities, and their students and communities, equally, as it did in the two previous relief packages. 
 
“Private, nonprofit colleges and universities, which are playing important roles in leading the nation’s recovery from the pandemic, are committed to ensuring their students, faculty, and staff are teaching and learning in safe, secure, and healthy environments.
 
“As colleges continue to work with their local communities and regions to help overcome the challenges presented by the pandemic, we look forward to discussing these issues over the next two days and working with Congress on this critical funding as the legislation moves through the House and Senate committees to a final passage in the weeks to come.”
 
#   #   # 
 
NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education and reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the U.S.  Our member institutions include major research universities, faith-based colleges, historically black colleges and universities, minority-serving institutions, art and design colleges, traditional liberal arts and science institutions, women’s colleges, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.  With more than 5 million students attending 1,700 independent colleges and universities in all 50 states, and more than 1 million employees, the private sector of American higher education has a dramatic impact on our nation’s larger public interests.
 

February 10, 2021

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About the items posted on the NAICU site: News items, features, and opinion pieces posted on this site from sources outside NAICU do not necessarily reflect the position of the association or its members. Rather, this content reflects the diversity of issues and views that are shaping American higher education.

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