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Analysis Shows Students' Use of Federal Student Aid by State and Congressional District

Analysis Shows Students' Use of Federal Student Aid by State and Co...

February 17, 2011

For Immediate Release
Contact:
Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu
Office: (202) 739-0474 | Cell: (202) 288-9333

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Feb. 17, 2011) - With the U.S. House of Representatives set to vote tonight on a budget proposal (H.R. 1) that will cut funding for Pell Grants, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG), and other federal student aid, a new analysis of U.S. Department of Education data by the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) quantifies the reliance on federal aid by students in every state and congressional district.

The data is publicly available on NAICU's website at www.naicu.edu/studentaid.

NAICU analyzed the most recently available Education Department data in late fall 2010 to determine the distribution of federal student aid in every area of the United States. For each state and congressional district, NAICU calculated the number of awards and total dollar amounts distributed through Pell Grants, the campus-based programs (SEOG, Federal Work-Study, and Perkins Loans), and federal loans. Data are for students at all institutions of higher education (public, private nonprofit, for-profit; four-year, two-year, and less than two-year) that participate in the federal student aid programs.

The House budget proposal (H.R. 1) would fund the federal government after March 4 through the remainder of FY 2011. The proposal, which would cut $100 billion from the federal budget, would be especially painful for low-income students.

Students would see an $845 reduction in the maximum Pell Grant, and the elimination of SEOG and the Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership Program. Summaries of how these programs help students are at www.naicu.edu/HR1Cuts.

The cuts would affect students as of July 1, 2011. Colleges are already putting together financial aid packages for their low-income students, many of whom have placed deposits and committed to enroll this fall, based on aid levels already promised by the federal government.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations, NAICU reflects the diversity of private nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

For Immediate Release
Contact:
Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu
Office: (202) 739-0474 | Cell: (202) 288-9333

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Feb. 17, 2011) - With the U.S. House of Representatives set to vote tonight on a budget proposal (H.R. 1) that will cut funding for Pell Grants, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG), and other federal student aid, a new analysis of U.S. Department of Education data by the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) quantifies the reliance on federal aid by students in every state and congressional district.

The data is publicly available on NAICU's website at www.naicu.edu/studentaid.

NAICU analyzed the most recently available Education Department data in late fall 2010 to determine the distribution of federal student aid in every area of the United States. For each state and congressional district, NAICU calculated the number of awards and total dollar amounts distributed through Pell Grants, the campus-based programs (SEOG, Federal Work-Study, and Perkins Loans), and federal loans. Data are for students at all institutions of higher education (public, private nonprofit, for-profit; four-year, two-year, and less than two-year) that participate in the federal student aid programs.

The House budget proposal (H.R. 1) would fund the federal government after March 4 through the remainder of FY 2011. The proposal, which would cut $100 billion from the federal budget, would be especially painful for low-income students.

Students would see an $845 reduction in the maximum Pell Grant, and the elimination of SEOG and the Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership Program. Summaries of how these programs help students are at www.naicu.edu/HR1Cuts.

The cuts would affect students as of July 1, 2011. Colleges are already putting together financial aid packages for their low-income students, many of whom have placed deposits and committed to enroll this fall, based on aid levels already promised by the federal government.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations, NAICU reflects the diversity of private nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

February 17, 2011

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New Officers, Members Named to NAICU Board

New Officers, Members Named to NAICU Board

February 03, 2011

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT:
 Roland King, roland@naicu.edu, (202) 739-0475 (office), (202) 380-8172 (cell)
or Sarah Cooper, csarah@naicu.edu, (202) 739-0477 (office)

February 3, 2011     

NAICU Membership Elects 2011-12 Board of Directors
Edgewood College President, Dan Carey, Elected as Board Chair

WASHINGTON, D.C., February 3 - The members of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) have selected 8 new board directors and four new board officers for 2011-12.  Members of NAICU's board of directors set the association's agenda on federal higher education policy; actively encourage support of NAICU priorities and initiatives; and oversee the association's financial administration. Members typically serve three-year terms.

"NAICU's new board members and officers were selected by their peers because of their expertise in the field, proven leadership, and commitment to America's college students," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "They assume their responsibilities at a time of great challenge and transformation for American higher education.

"The economic downturn, growing student financial need, and the push for greater accountability are among the dynamics affecting higher education," Warren said.

New NAICU Board Officers     

Dr. Dan Carey, president, Edgewood College, in Madison, Wis., has been elected chair of the NAICU board of directors. His one-year term as chair of NAICU's board was ratified February 3 by member college and university presidents at the 2011 NAICU Annual Meeting. Vice chair of the board in 2009-10, Carey succeeds Dr. John E. Bassett, president of Heritage University, who remains on the board as past chair. 

Carey has been president of Edgewood since August 2004, and served as president at Benedictine College in Kansas. from 1995 - 2004. He received his Ph.D. in college student personnel administration and M.S. in psychology, counseling, and guidance from the University of Northern Colorado. He graduated from Benedictine College with a B.A. in English.

Dr. Nathan O. Hatch, president of Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, NC., will serve as vice chair on the NAICU board of directors. Hatch became president of Wake Forest University in July 2005 after serving as Provost at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree at Wheaton College and his masters and doctoral degrees from Washington University in Saint Louis. 

Dr. Trudie Kibbe Reed, president of Bethune Cookman University in Daytona Beach, Florida, has been named secretary

Dr. Mary Meehan, president of Alverno College in Milwaukee, Wis., has been named treasurer.

Eight new members were elected to three-year terms on the NAICU board, representing the association's national regions:

Fr. Jonathan DeFelice President, Saint Anselm College
Region I (Conn., Maine, Mass., N.H., R.I., Vt.)

Dr. Kevin Manning, President, Stevenson University
Region II (Del., D.C., Md., N.J., N.Y.)

Dr. Joseph Gilmour, President, Wilkes University
Region III (Ky., Ohio, Pa., W.Va.)

Kent Chabotar, President, Guilford College
Region IV (Fla., Ga., N.C., S.C., Va.)

Rev. Dr. David Joyce, President, Ripon College
Region V (Ill., Ind., Mich., Wis.)

Dr. Lee Royce, President, Mississippi College
Region VI (Ala., Ark., La., Miss., Okla., Tenn., Texas)

Dr. Larry Goodwin, President, College college of St. Scholastica
Region VII (Iowa, Kan., Minn., Mo., Neb., N.D., S.D.)

Dr. Robin Baker, President, George Fox University
Region VIII (Alaska, Ariz., Calif., Colo., Hawaii, Idaho, Mont., N.M., Nev., Ore., Utah, Wash., Wyo.)

Four presidents have been named to three-year terms as at-large members of the board:

Dr. Andrew Benton, President, Pepperdine University
Dr. Robert Coombe, Chancellor, University of Denver
Dr. Elizabeth Fleming, President, Converse College
Dr. Tracy Fitzsimmons, President, Shenandoah University

An ad-hoc, non-voting government relations person will serve a three-year term, also beginning in February on the NAICU Board of Directors:

             Ms. Joyce Rechtschaffen, Director of Government Affairs, Princeton University.

A voting NAICUSE member will serve a three-year term, also beginning in February on the NAICU Board of Directors:

             Mr. Todd Jones, President/General Councel, Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Ohio.

NAICU is the leading national association representing private higher education, serving as the unified voice of more than 1,000 independent college and university presidents, and specialized, state, and regional association executives.  NAICU member institutions enroll nine out of every 10 students attending a private college or university in the United States. 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT:
 Roland King, roland@naicu.edu, (202) 739-0475 (office), (202) 380-8172 (cell)
or Sarah Cooper, csarah@naicu.edu, (202) 739-0477 (office)

February 3, 2011     

NAICU Membership Elects 2011-12 Board of Directors
Edgewood College President, Dan Carey, Elected as Board Chair

WASHINGTON, D.C., February 3 - The members of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) have selected 8 new board directors and four new board officers for 2011-12.  Members of NAICU's board of directors set the association's agenda on federal higher education policy; actively encourage support of NAICU priorities and initiatives; and oversee the association's financial administration. Members typically serve three-year terms.

"NAICU's new board members and officers were selected by their peers because of their expertise in the field, proven leadership, and commitment to America's college students," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "They assume their responsibilities at a time of great challenge and transformation for American higher education.

"The economic downturn, growing student financial need, and the push for greater accountability are among the dynamics affecting higher education," Warren said.

New NAICU Board Officers     

Dr. Dan Carey, president, Edgewood College, in Madison, Wis., has been elected chair of the NAICU board of directors. His one-year term as chair of NAICU's board was ratified February 3 by member college and university presidents at the 2011 NAICU Annual Meeting. Vice chair of the board in 2009-10, Carey succeeds Dr. John E. Bassett, president of Heritage University, who remains on the board as past chair. 

Carey has been president of Edgewood since August 2004, and served as president at Benedictine College in Kansas. from 1995 - 2004. He received his Ph.D. in college student personnel administration and M.S. in psychology, counseling, and guidance from the University of Northern Colorado. He graduated from Benedictine College with a B.A. in English.

Dr. Nathan O. Hatch, president of Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, NC., will serve as vice chair on the NAICU board of directors. Hatch became president of Wake Forest University in July 2005 after serving as Provost at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree at Wheaton College and his masters and doctoral degrees from Washington University in Saint Louis. 

Dr. Trudie Kibbe Reed, president of Bethune Cookman University in Daytona Beach, Florida, has been named secretary

Dr. Mary Meehan, president of Alverno College in Milwaukee, Wis., has been named treasurer.

Eight new members were elected to three-year terms on the NAICU board, representing the association's national regions:

Fr. Jonathan DeFelice President, Saint Anselm College
Region I (Conn., Maine, Mass., N.H., R.I., Vt.)

Dr. Kevin Manning, President, Stevenson University
Region II (Del., D.C., Md., N.J., N.Y.)

Dr. Joseph Gilmour, President, Wilkes University
Region III (Ky., Ohio, Pa., W.Va.)

Kent Chabotar, President, Guilford College
Region IV (Fla., Ga., N.C., S.C., Va.)

Rev. Dr. David Joyce, President, Ripon College
Region V (Ill., Ind., Mich., Wis.)

Dr. Lee Royce, President, Mississippi College
Region VI (Ala., Ark., La., Miss., Okla., Tenn., Texas)

Dr. Larry Goodwin, President, College college of St. Scholastica
Region VII (Iowa, Kan., Minn., Mo., Neb., N.D., S.D.)

Dr. Robin Baker, President, George Fox University
Region VIII (Alaska, Ariz., Calif., Colo., Hawaii, Idaho, Mont., N.M., Nev., Ore., Utah, Wash., Wyo.)

Four presidents have been named to three-year terms as at-large members of the board:

Dr. Andrew Benton, President, Pepperdine University
Dr. Robert Coombe, Chancellor, University of Denver
Dr. Elizabeth Fleming, President, Converse College
Dr. Tracy Fitzsimmons, President, Shenandoah University

An ad-hoc, non-voting government relations person will serve a three-year term, also beginning in February on the NAICU Board of Directors:

             Ms. Joyce Rechtschaffen, Director of Government Affairs, Princeton University.

A voting NAICUSE member will serve a three-year term, also beginning in February on the NAICU Board of Directors:

             Mr. Todd Jones, President/General Councel, Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Ohio.

NAICU is the leading national association representing private higher education, serving as the unified voice of more than 1,000 independent college and university presidents, and specialized, state, and regional association executives.  NAICU member institutions enroll nine out of every 10 students attending a private college or university in the United States. 

February 03, 2011

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Father Charles L. Currie Receives 2011 Paley Award for Service to Independent Higher Education

Father Charles L. Currie Receives 2011 Paley Award for Service to I...

February 01, 2011

For Immediate Release

Contact:
Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu, (202) 739-0474

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 1--The Reverend Charles L. Currie, S.J., president of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities (AJCU), has received the 2011 Henry Paley Memorial Award from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). He received the award from NAICU President David L. Warren on Tuesday, Feb. 1, at the NAICU annual meeting. The meeting is being held at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education. The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States. The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984.

Father Currie is one of the best known - and most loved - advocates for independent higher education in Washington, across the country, and internationally. He has been a tireless supporter of students and colleges, and has balanced that mission with his efforts to assist victims of natural disasters nationally and war crimes internationally.

During his tenure, the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities has moved to the forefront of efforts to preserve student aid, increase access to the underserved, and strengthen the nation's educational system in providing greater opportunities for a college education among underserved populations.

"Father Currie has touched the lives of countless individuals in our community and beyond," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "He is truly a gift, not just to our sector but to all of higher education."

"For his exemplary service to students at every level of our educational system, and for his tireless advocacy for those in need, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is pleased to honor the lifelong contributions of the Reverend Charles Currie, S.J., with its 2011 Henry Paley Memorial Award," Warren said.

Father Currie became president of AJCU in 1997, after having served as president of Wheeling College (now Wheeling Jesuit University) in West Virginia and Xavier University in Ohio. Under his leadership, the association has undertaken a wealth of new initiatives, such as establishing the AJCU Seminar on Higher Education Leadership, enhancing the commitment of Jesuit colleges and universities to educate for justice, and developing the Jesuit Distance Education Network (JesuitNET). He has been a cofounder of both the Ignatian Family Teach-in for Justice and the Ignatian Solidarity Network.

Father Currie has extensive international experience. In 1989 he traveled to El Salvador after the assassination of Jesuit priests there, and was named special assistant to the president of Georgetown University to coordinate the university's response to the tragedy. He has also built educational alliances in Vietnam, China, Cuba, and across Latin America.

A native of Philadelphia, Father Currie has studied at Fordham University, Boston College, and Woodstock College, a Jesuit seminary that since closed. He earned a Ph.D. in physical chemistry at The Catholic University of America, then pursued post-doctoral research at Cambridge University, the Canadian National Research Council, and the National Bureau of Standards in Washington. He also has held faculty positions at Georgetown University and Saint Joseph's University.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

###

 

 


For Immediate Release

Contact:
Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu, (202) 739-0474

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 1--The Reverend Charles L. Currie, S.J., president of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities (AJCU), has received the 2011 Henry Paley Memorial Award from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). He received the award from NAICU President David L. Warren on Tuesday, Feb. 1, at the NAICU annual meeting. The meeting is being held at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education. The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States. The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984.

Father Currie is one of the best known - and most loved - advocates for independent higher education in Washington, across the country, and internationally. He has been a tireless supporter of students and colleges, and has balanced that mission with his efforts to assist victims of natural disasters nationally and war crimes internationally.

During his tenure, the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities has moved to the forefront of efforts to preserve student aid, increase access to the underserved, and strengthen the nation's educational system in providing greater opportunities for a college education among underserved populations.

"Father Currie has touched the lives of countless individuals in our community and beyond," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "He is truly a gift, not just to our sector but to all of higher education."

"For his exemplary service to students at every level of our educational system, and for his tireless advocacy for those in need, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is pleased to honor the lifelong contributions of the Reverend Charles Currie, S.J., with its 2011 Henry Paley Memorial Award," Warren said.

Father Currie became president of AJCU in 1997, after having served as president of Wheeling College (now Wheeling Jesuit University) in West Virginia and Xavier University in Ohio. Under his leadership, the association has undertaken a wealth of new initiatives, such as establishing the AJCU Seminar on Higher Education Leadership, enhancing the commitment of Jesuit colleges and universities to educate for justice, and developing the Jesuit Distance Education Network (JesuitNET). He has been a cofounder of both the Ignatian Family Teach-in for Justice and the Ignatian Solidarity Network.

Father Currie has extensive international experience. In 1989 he traveled to El Salvador after the assassination of Jesuit priests there, and was named special assistant to the president of Georgetown University to coordinate the university's response to the tragedy. He has also built educational alliances in Vietnam, China, Cuba, and across Latin America.

A native of Philadelphia, Father Currie has studied at Fordham University, Boston College, and Woodstock College, a Jesuit seminary that since closed. He earned a Ph.D. in physical chemistry at The Catholic University of America, then pursued post-doctoral research at Cambridge University, the Canadian National Research Council, and the National Bureau of Standards in Washington. He also has held faculty positions at Georgetown University and Saint Joseph's University.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

###

 

 


February 01, 2011

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Representative Tim Bishop Receives 2011 NAICU Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education

Representative Tim Bishop Receives 2011 NAICU Award for Advocacy of...

February 01, 2011

For Immediate Release

Contact:
Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu, (202) 739-0474

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 1--Representative Tim Bishop, D-N.Y., has received the 2011 Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). The award was presented by NAICU President David L. Warren during a luncheon on Tuesday, February 1, at the NAICU annual meeting. The meeting is being held at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

The NAICU Advocacy Award was established in 1993 to recognize individuals outside of academe who have championed the cause of independent nonprofit higher education. No single contribution makes one eligible to receive the award. Instead, it recognizes a lifetime of service, initiative, and determination.

Prior to his election to Congress, Rep. Bishop worked as a college administrator for more than 25 years. This intense and in-depth campus experience gives Bishop a rare level of insight into higher education policy and the student aid programs - insight that has proven invaluable over his eight years in Congress.

Rep. Bishop has been a staunch promoter of the federal student aid programs. As a former financial aid director, he appreciates the value of the campus-based aid programs that allow colleges to target additional aid to students with circumstances beyond the measure of any federal need analysis system. At a time when many consider these programs to be duplicative, he knows that they complement the foundation Pell Grant program.

More recently, Bishop has led the effort in Congress to redesign, instead of eliminate, the Perkins Loan Program. Under his vision, the program would be greatly expanded to serve more students at more schools, allowing for less high-cost private loan borrowing. As a member of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, and past member of the House Committee on the Budget he has been particularly influential in this debate.

"Rep. Bishop understands the importance of providing opportunity to students, without hampering the creativity and independence of the nation's colleges," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "No member of Congress better appreciates and supports the rich diversity of American higher education, and the importance of that diversity - both to our nation's future, and to the individual futures of our citizens."

"For the depth of understanding he brings to higher education issues, for his appreciation of the role of private non-profit higher education in our society, and for his unwavering support of the federal student aid programs on behalf of our students, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is pleased to present Congressman Tim Bishop with the 18th Annual NAICU Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education," Warren said.

Bishop received his A.B. from Holy Cross College, and his master's degree from Long Island University. He worked for over 25 years at Long Island University - beginning in the financial aid office and ultimately as provost at the university's Southampton College for 15 years, but also serving in various administrative positions along the way.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

###

 


For Immediate Release

Contact:
Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu, (202) 739-0474

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 1--Representative Tim Bishop, D-N.Y., has received the 2011 Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). The award was presented by NAICU President David L. Warren during a luncheon on Tuesday, February 1, at the NAICU annual meeting. The meeting is being held at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

The NAICU Advocacy Award was established in 1993 to recognize individuals outside of academe who have championed the cause of independent nonprofit higher education. No single contribution makes one eligible to receive the award. Instead, it recognizes a lifetime of service, initiative, and determination.

Prior to his election to Congress, Rep. Bishop worked as a college administrator for more than 25 years. This intense and in-depth campus experience gives Bishop a rare level of insight into higher education policy and the student aid programs - insight that has proven invaluable over his eight years in Congress.

Rep. Bishop has been a staunch promoter of the federal student aid programs. As a former financial aid director, he appreciates the value of the campus-based aid programs that allow colleges to target additional aid to students with circumstances beyond the measure of any federal need analysis system. At a time when many consider these programs to be duplicative, he knows that they complement the foundation Pell Grant program.

More recently, Bishop has led the effort in Congress to redesign, instead of eliminate, the Perkins Loan Program. Under his vision, the program would be greatly expanded to serve more students at more schools, allowing for less high-cost private loan borrowing. As a member of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, and past member of the House Committee on the Budget he has been particularly influential in this debate.

"Rep. Bishop understands the importance of providing opportunity to students, without hampering the creativity and independence of the nation's colleges," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "No member of Congress better appreciates and supports the rich diversity of American higher education, and the importance of that diversity - both to our nation's future, and to the individual futures of our citizens."

"For the depth of understanding he brings to higher education issues, for his appreciation of the role of private non-profit higher education in our society, and for his unwavering support of the federal student aid programs on behalf of our students, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is pleased to present Congressman Tim Bishop with the 18th Annual NAICU Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education," Warren said.

Bishop received his A.B. from Holy Cross College, and his master's degree from Long Island University. He worked for over 25 years at Long Island University - beginning in the financial aid office and ultimately as provost at the university's Southampton College for 15 years, but also serving in various administrative positions along the way.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

###

 


February 01, 2011

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NAICU Statement on Executive Compensation at Private Colleges and Universities

NAICU Statement on Executive Compensation at Private Colleges and U...

November 14, 2010

Statement by David L. Warren, President, National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, Issued Upon Distribution of the Chronicle of Higher Education's Annual Presidential Salary Survey

The salaries of executives at private colleges and universities reflect supply and demand. Searches for these positions at a significant number of independent institutions are highly competitive, and colleges must offer compensation packages that attract qualified leaders. Salaries are largely set through marketplace studies.

The job of college president has changed dramatically in the last 30 years, as have the demands. There is just a small pool of candidates who possess the skill set that is required, and are willing to take on the stressful 24/7 nature of the position.

Presidents must have fund-raising expertise, political savvy, solid management experience, a strong business sense, the ability to develop and deliver an educational vision for the institution, negotiating and mediating skills, and the ability to represent the college effectively to diverse stakeholders. Presidents must be capable of administrating organizations with thousands of employees and budgets reaching hundreds of millions of dollars at many larger institutions.

Private college leaders face increased pressure on many fronts: severe budget shortfalls brought on by the Great Recession, uncertainty about the long-term sustainability of higher education’s traditional financial model, calls for further government regulation, greater competition from public and for-profit institutions, and consumer concerns about growing sticker prices.

A recent study by the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) illustrates the impact of the growing pressures of the job on the size of the pool of qualified candidates. CIC reports that less than one in four chief academic officers at private colleges plan to pursue a presidency.

Presidential salaries make up a very small percentage of overall campus budgets, and have virtually no impact on tuition increases. In fact, inflation-adjusted net tuition at nonprofit private colleges and universities actually declined by 11.2 percent in the past five years, according to the College Board.

###
 
Statement by David L. Warren, President, National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, Issued Upon Distribution of the Chronicle of Higher Education's Annual Presidential Salary Survey

The salaries of executives at private colleges and universities reflect supply and demand. Searches for these positions at a significant number of independent institutions are highly competitive, and colleges must offer compensation packages that attract qualified leaders. Salaries are largely set through marketplace studies.

The job of college president has changed dramatically in the last 30 years, as have the demands. There is just a small pool of candidates who possess the skill set that is required, and are willing to take on the stressful 24/7 nature of the position.

Presidents must have fund-raising expertise, political savvy, solid management experience, a strong business sense, the ability to develop and deliver an educational vision for the institution, negotiating and mediating skills, and the ability to represent the college effectively to diverse stakeholders. Presidents must be capable of administrating organizations with thousands of employees and budgets reaching hundreds of millions of dollars at many larger institutions.

Private college leaders face increased pressure on many fronts: severe budget shortfalls brought on by the Great Recession, uncertainty about the long-term sustainability of higher education’s traditional financial model, calls for further government regulation, greater competition from public and for-profit institutions, and consumer concerns about growing sticker prices.

A recent study by the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) illustrates the impact of the growing pressures of the job on the size of the pool of qualified candidates. CIC reports that less than one in four chief academic officers at private colleges plan to pursue a presidency.

Presidential salaries make up a very small percentage of overall campus budgets, and have virtually no impact on tuition increases. In fact, inflation-adjusted net tuition at nonprofit private colleges and universities actually declined by 11.2 percent in the past five years, according to the College Board.

###
 

November 14, 2010

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About the items posted on the NAICU site: News items, features, and opinion pieces posted on this site from sources outside NAICU do not necessarily reflect the position of the association or its members. Rather, this content reflects the diversity of issues and views that are shaping American higher education.

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