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Father Charles L. Currie Receives 2011 Paley Award for Service to Independent Higher Education

Father Charles L. Currie Receives 2011 Paley Award for Service to I...

February 01, 2011

For Immediate Release

Contact:
Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu, (202) 739-0474

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 1--The Reverend Charles L. Currie, S.J., president of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities (AJCU), has received the 2011 Henry Paley Memorial Award from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). He received the award from NAICU President David L. Warren on Tuesday, Feb. 1, at the NAICU annual meeting. The meeting is being held at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education. The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States. The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984.

Father Currie is one of the best known - and most loved - advocates for independent higher education in Washington, across the country, and internationally. He has been a tireless supporter of students and colleges, and has balanced that mission with his efforts to assist victims of natural disasters nationally and war crimes internationally.

During his tenure, the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities has moved to the forefront of efforts to preserve student aid, increase access to the underserved, and strengthen the nation's educational system in providing greater opportunities for a college education among underserved populations.

"Father Currie has touched the lives of countless individuals in our community and beyond," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "He is truly a gift, not just to our sector but to all of higher education."

"For his exemplary service to students at every level of our educational system, and for his tireless advocacy for those in need, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is pleased to honor the lifelong contributions of the Reverend Charles Currie, S.J., with its 2011 Henry Paley Memorial Award," Warren said.

Father Currie became president of AJCU in 1997, after having served as president of Wheeling College (now Wheeling Jesuit University) in West Virginia and Xavier University in Ohio. Under his leadership, the association has undertaken a wealth of new initiatives, such as establishing the AJCU Seminar on Higher Education Leadership, enhancing the commitment of Jesuit colleges and universities to educate for justice, and developing the Jesuit Distance Education Network (JesuitNET). He has been a cofounder of both the Ignatian Family Teach-in for Justice and the Ignatian Solidarity Network.

Father Currie has extensive international experience. In 1989 he traveled to El Salvador after the assassination of Jesuit priests there, and was named special assistant to the president of Georgetown University to coordinate the university's response to the tragedy. He has also built educational alliances in Vietnam, China, Cuba, and across Latin America.

A native of Philadelphia, Father Currie has studied at Fordham University, Boston College, and Woodstock College, a Jesuit seminary that since closed. He earned a Ph.D. in physical chemistry at The Catholic University of America, then pursued post-doctoral research at Cambridge University, the Canadian National Research Council, and the National Bureau of Standards in Washington. He also has held faculty positions at Georgetown University and Saint Joseph's University.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

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For Immediate Release

Contact:
Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu, (202) 739-0474

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 1--The Reverend Charles L. Currie, S.J., president of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities (AJCU), has received the 2011 Henry Paley Memorial Award from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). He received the award from NAICU President David L. Warren on Tuesday, Feb. 1, at the NAICU annual meeting. The meeting is being held at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education. The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States. The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984.

Father Currie is one of the best known - and most loved - advocates for independent higher education in Washington, across the country, and internationally. He has been a tireless supporter of students and colleges, and has balanced that mission with his efforts to assist victims of natural disasters nationally and war crimes internationally.

During his tenure, the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities has moved to the forefront of efforts to preserve student aid, increase access to the underserved, and strengthen the nation's educational system in providing greater opportunities for a college education among underserved populations.

"Father Currie has touched the lives of countless individuals in our community and beyond," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "He is truly a gift, not just to our sector but to all of higher education."

"For his exemplary service to students at every level of our educational system, and for his tireless advocacy for those in need, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is pleased to honor the lifelong contributions of the Reverend Charles Currie, S.J., with its 2011 Henry Paley Memorial Award," Warren said.

Father Currie became president of AJCU in 1997, after having served as president of Wheeling College (now Wheeling Jesuit University) in West Virginia and Xavier University in Ohio. Under his leadership, the association has undertaken a wealth of new initiatives, such as establishing the AJCU Seminar on Higher Education Leadership, enhancing the commitment of Jesuit colleges and universities to educate for justice, and developing the Jesuit Distance Education Network (JesuitNET). He has been a cofounder of both the Ignatian Family Teach-in for Justice and the Ignatian Solidarity Network.

Father Currie has extensive international experience. In 1989 he traveled to El Salvador after the assassination of Jesuit priests there, and was named special assistant to the president of Georgetown University to coordinate the university's response to the tragedy. He has also built educational alliances in Vietnam, China, Cuba, and across Latin America.

A native of Philadelphia, Father Currie has studied at Fordham University, Boston College, and Woodstock College, a Jesuit seminary that since closed. He earned a Ph.D. in physical chemistry at The Catholic University of America, then pursued post-doctoral research at Cambridge University, the Canadian National Research Council, and the National Bureau of Standards in Washington. He also has held faculty positions at Georgetown University and Saint Joseph's University.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

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February 01, 2011

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Representative Tim Bishop Receives 2011 NAICU Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education

Representative Tim Bishop Receives 2011 NAICU Award for Advocacy of...

February 01, 2011

For Immediate Release

Contact:
Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu, (202) 739-0474

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 1--Representative Tim Bishop, D-N.Y., has received the 2011 Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). The award was presented by NAICU President David L. Warren during a luncheon on Tuesday, February 1, at the NAICU annual meeting. The meeting is being held at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

The NAICU Advocacy Award was established in 1993 to recognize individuals outside of academe who have championed the cause of independent nonprofit higher education. No single contribution makes one eligible to receive the award. Instead, it recognizes a lifetime of service, initiative, and determination.

Prior to his election to Congress, Rep. Bishop worked as a college administrator for more than 25 years. This intense and in-depth campus experience gives Bishop a rare level of insight into higher education policy and the student aid programs - insight that has proven invaluable over his eight years in Congress.

Rep. Bishop has been a staunch promoter of the federal student aid programs. As a former financial aid director, he appreciates the value of the campus-based aid programs that allow colleges to target additional aid to students with circumstances beyond the measure of any federal need analysis system. At a time when many consider these programs to be duplicative, he knows that they complement the foundation Pell Grant program.

More recently, Bishop has led the effort in Congress to redesign, instead of eliminate, the Perkins Loan Program. Under his vision, the program would be greatly expanded to serve more students at more schools, allowing for less high-cost private loan borrowing. As a member of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, and past member of the House Committee on the Budget he has been particularly influential in this debate.

"Rep. Bishop understands the importance of providing opportunity to students, without hampering the creativity and independence of the nation's colleges," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "No member of Congress better appreciates and supports the rich diversity of American higher education, and the importance of that diversity - both to our nation's future, and to the individual futures of our citizens."

"For the depth of understanding he brings to higher education issues, for his appreciation of the role of private non-profit higher education in our society, and for his unwavering support of the federal student aid programs on behalf of our students, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is pleased to present Congressman Tim Bishop with the 18th Annual NAICU Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education," Warren said.

Bishop received his A.B. from Holy Cross College, and his master's degree from Long Island University. He worked for over 25 years at Long Island University - beginning in the financial aid office and ultimately as provost at the university's Southampton College for 15 years, but also serving in various administrative positions along the way.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

###

 


For Immediate Release

Contact:
Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu, (202) 739-0474

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 1--Representative Tim Bishop, D-N.Y., has received the 2011 Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). The award was presented by NAICU President David L. Warren during a luncheon on Tuesday, February 1, at the NAICU annual meeting. The meeting is being held at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

The NAICU Advocacy Award was established in 1993 to recognize individuals outside of academe who have championed the cause of independent nonprofit higher education. No single contribution makes one eligible to receive the award. Instead, it recognizes a lifetime of service, initiative, and determination.

Prior to his election to Congress, Rep. Bishop worked as a college administrator for more than 25 years. This intense and in-depth campus experience gives Bishop a rare level of insight into higher education policy and the student aid programs - insight that has proven invaluable over his eight years in Congress.

Rep. Bishop has been a staunch promoter of the federal student aid programs. As a former financial aid director, he appreciates the value of the campus-based aid programs that allow colleges to target additional aid to students with circumstances beyond the measure of any federal need analysis system. At a time when many consider these programs to be duplicative, he knows that they complement the foundation Pell Grant program.

More recently, Bishop has led the effort in Congress to redesign, instead of eliminate, the Perkins Loan Program. Under his vision, the program would be greatly expanded to serve more students at more schools, allowing for less high-cost private loan borrowing. As a member of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, and past member of the House Committee on the Budget he has been particularly influential in this debate.

"Rep. Bishop understands the importance of providing opportunity to students, without hampering the creativity and independence of the nation's colleges," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "No member of Congress better appreciates and supports the rich diversity of American higher education, and the importance of that diversity - both to our nation's future, and to the individual futures of our citizens."

"For the depth of understanding he brings to higher education issues, for his appreciation of the role of private non-profit higher education in our society, and for his unwavering support of the federal student aid programs on behalf of our students, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is pleased to present Congressman Tim Bishop with the 18th Annual NAICU Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education," Warren said.

Bishop received his A.B. from Holy Cross College, and his master's degree from Long Island University. He worked for over 25 years at Long Island University - beginning in the financial aid office and ultimately as provost at the university's Southampton College for 15 years, but also serving in various administrative positions along the way.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

###

 


February 01, 2011

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NAICU Statement on Executive Compensation at Private Colleges and Universities

NAICU Statement on Executive Compensation at Private Colleges and U...

November 14, 2010

Statement by David L. Warren, President, National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, Issued Upon Distribution of the Chronicle of Higher Education's Annual Presidential Salary Survey

The salaries of executives at private colleges and universities reflect supply and demand. Searches for these positions at a significant number of independent institutions are highly competitive, and colleges must offer compensation packages that attract qualified leaders. Salaries are largely set through marketplace studies.

The job of college president has changed dramatically in the last 30 years, as have the demands. There is just a small pool of candidates who possess the skill set that is required, and are willing to take on the stressful 24/7 nature of the position.

Presidents must have fund-raising expertise, political savvy, solid management experience, a strong business sense, the ability to develop and deliver an educational vision for the institution, negotiating and mediating skills, and the ability to represent the college effectively to diverse stakeholders. Presidents must be capable of administrating organizations with thousands of employees and budgets reaching hundreds of millions of dollars at many larger institutions.

Private college leaders face increased pressure on many fronts: severe budget shortfalls brought on by the Great Recession, uncertainty about the long-term sustainability of higher education’s traditional financial model, calls for further government regulation, greater competition from public and for-profit institutions, and consumer concerns about growing sticker prices.

A recent study by the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) illustrates the impact of the growing pressures of the job on the size of the pool of qualified candidates. CIC reports that less than one in four chief academic officers at private colleges plan to pursue a presidency.

Presidential salaries make up a very small percentage of overall campus budgets, and have virtually no impact on tuition increases. In fact, inflation-adjusted net tuition at nonprofit private colleges and universities actually declined by 11.2 percent in the past five years, according to the College Board.

###
 
Statement by David L. Warren, President, National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, Issued Upon Distribution of the Chronicle of Higher Education's Annual Presidential Salary Survey

The salaries of executives at private colleges and universities reflect supply and demand. Searches for these positions at a significant number of independent institutions are highly competitive, and colleges must offer compensation packages that attract qualified leaders. Salaries are largely set through marketplace studies.

The job of college president has changed dramatically in the last 30 years, as have the demands. There is just a small pool of candidates who possess the skill set that is required, and are willing to take on the stressful 24/7 nature of the position.

Presidents must have fund-raising expertise, political savvy, solid management experience, a strong business sense, the ability to develop and deliver an educational vision for the institution, negotiating and mediating skills, and the ability to represent the college effectively to diverse stakeholders. Presidents must be capable of administrating organizations with thousands of employees and budgets reaching hundreds of millions of dollars at many larger institutions.

Private college leaders face increased pressure on many fronts: severe budget shortfalls brought on by the Great Recession, uncertainty about the long-term sustainability of higher education’s traditional financial model, calls for further government regulation, greater competition from public and for-profit institutions, and consumer concerns about growing sticker prices.

A recent study by the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) illustrates the impact of the growing pressures of the job on the size of the pool of qualified candidates. CIC reports that less than one in four chief academic officers at private colleges plan to pursue a presidency.

Presidential salaries make up a very small percentage of overall campus budgets, and have virtually no impact on tuition increases. In fact, inflation-adjusted net tuition at nonprofit private colleges and universities actually declined by 11.2 percent in the past five years, according to the College Board.

###
 

November 14, 2010

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NAICU, CIC Unveil Website to Support Student Access, Success Efforts at Private Colleges

NAICU, CIC Unveil Website to Support Student Access, Success Effort...

September 23, 2010

FOR RELEASE: Thursday, Sept. 23           

Project Supports National Goal of Making U.S. First Again in College Completion

[Note to Editors: Quotes from key national policymakers are provided at the end of this release]

WASHINGTON, D.C., Sept. 23, 2010-The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) and Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) unveiled a new website (http://www.buildingblocks2020.org/) today designed to highlight and support efforts by nonprofit private colleges and universities to increase the number of at-risk students they enroll, and to boost the retention and graduation rates of various student populations.

The website is the central component of Building Blocks to 2020, a national initiative organized by NAICU and CIC to help the nation meet President Obama's call to make the United States first in college completion by 2020. 

The website provides opportunities for campus professionals working on the front lines of student access, retention, and completion to learn from the experiences of other colleges, and to mine for practices and policies that fit their individual institutional missions and student populations. The website will also serve as an information resource for consumers and policymakers who are interested in what colleges are doing to not only reach out to students from diverse backgrounds, but boost their chances of earning a degree.  The number and diversity of institutions and programs represented on the website will grow, as NAICU continues to gather and post material from colleges and universities.

At the moment, the Building Blocks to 2020 website provides summaries of 535 existing or proposed programs at 250 nonprofit private colleges and universities.  Summaries of programs can be browsed alphabetically by institution, and by state, and are searchable by 34 topics

Up until about 10 years ago, the U.S. led the world in college completion.  However, as the percentage of young adults with degrees has surged in other developed nations, the U.S. now ranks 12th in the percentage of adults 25 to 34 with an associate's degree or higher, according to the College Board

"Nonprofit private colleges are committed to doing their part to make the U.S. first in the world in college completion again, and are redoubling their efforts to increase the number of graduates from all backgrounds," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "Given the productivity of the nonprofit private sector in graduating students - we enroll 19 percent of all students, but award 26 percent of all degrees - our institutions will be a crucial part of helping the nation reach the 2020 goal."

"For any group of students you want to follow-top students in high school, first-generation, low-income, high-income, or minority-nonprofit independent colleges have the best record of graduating students in timely fashion, thereby helping to fulfill President Obama's goal that many more Americans will have high-quality college degrees," said CIC President Richard Ekman.

In the next year, NAICU and CIC will ask all private colleges to report on their progress toward meeting self-identified goals in producing more college graduates; increasing graduation and/or retention rates; increasing success with at-risk students, and/or increasing graduates in areas of national need.  The two associations will issue a milestone report summarizing the sector's progress.  NAICU and CIC will release additional milestone reports periodically.

Quotes from Key National Policymakers

Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA)
Chairman - Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee

"President Obama has made graduating more Americans from college a national priority, and I applaud NAICU and CIC for their work to make the United States first in the world in college completion by 2020. As we reach toward the president's goal, I will continue to take every step possible to ensure that a college education and the greater skills, higher salary and better employment opportunities that it brings remains within reach of every American student."

.............................................................................................

Senator Mike Enzi (R-WY)
Ranking Member - Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee

"In a rapidly changing global economy, access to a college education is simply not enough. Increasing the competitiveness and prosperity of our workforce requires that our students complete their course of study and cross the finish line to success."

.............................................................................................

Congressman George Miller (D-CA)
Chairman - House of Representatives Education and Labor Committee

"Especially in this economy, it is clear students need all the resources we can give them to ensure they can complete college and graduate with the skills to compete in a global economy. These types of programs rightfully identify students' needs and supports them at every step along their path toward graduation. I applaud NAICU's efforts to help college students succeed while in school and after graduation."

.............................................................................................

Congressman John Kline (R-MN)
Ranking Member - House of Representatives Education and Labor Committee

"To keep America competitive, students from all backgrounds need the tools and support to succeed in postsecondary education. I applaud school-based initiatives to promote success among vulnerable populations, including those spearheaded by independent colleges and universities. Institutions of higher education know the students they serve, and they are well equipped to customize programs and services to help their students thrive."

About the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU)

NAICU is the premier advocacy association for the nation's private colleges and universities, with a membership of more than 1,000 private colleges and related associations. Member institutions include major research universities, church-related colleges, historically black colleges, traditional liberal arts and science institutions, women's colleges, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions. Nationally, over three million students attend private colleges and universities. For more information, visit www.naicu.edu.

About the Council of Independent Colleges and Universities (CIC)

CIC is an association of more than 600 independent, liberal arts colleges and universities and higher education affiliates and organizations that work together to strengthen college and university leadership, sustain high-quality education, and enhance private higher education's contributions to society. To fulfill this mission, CIC provides its members with skills, tools, and knowledge that address aspects of leadership, financial management and performance, academic quality, and institutional visibility. For more information, visit http://www.cic.edu/.

###

CONTACTS:
Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu
office: (202) 739-0474 cell: (202) 288-9333
Twitter: @naicutweets

Roland King, roland@naicu.edu
office: (202) 739-0475 cell: (202) 380-8172

FOR RELEASE: Thursday, Sept. 23           

Project Supports National Goal of Making U.S. First Again in College Completion

[Note to Editors: Quotes from key national policymakers are provided at the end of this release]

WASHINGTON, D.C., Sept. 23, 2010-The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) and Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) unveiled a new website (http://www.buildingblocks2020.org/) today designed to highlight and support efforts by nonprofit private colleges and universities to increase the number of at-risk students they enroll, and to boost the retention and graduation rates of various student populations.

The website is the central component of Building Blocks to 2020, a national initiative organized by NAICU and CIC to help the nation meet President Obama's call to make the United States first in college completion by 2020. 

The website provides opportunities for campus professionals working on the front lines of student access, retention, and completion to learn from the experiences of other colleges, and to mine for practices and policies that fit their individual institutional missions and student populations. The website will also serve as an information resource for consumers and policymakers who are interested in what colleges are doing to not only reach out to students from diverse backgrounds, but boost their chances of earning a degree.  The number and diversity of institutions and programs represented on the website will grow, as NAICU continues to gather and post material from colleges and universities.

At the moment, the Building Blocks to 2020 website provides summaries of 535 existing or proposed programs at 250 nonprofit private colleges and universities.  Summaries of programs can be browsed alphabetically by institution, and by state, and are searchable by 34 topics

Up until about 10 years ago, the U.S. led the world in college completion.  However, as the percentage of young adults with degrees has surged in other developed nations, the U.S. now ranks 12th in the percentage of adults 25 to 34 with an associate's degree or higher, according to the College Board

"Nonprofit private colleges are committed to doing their part to make the U.S. first in the world in college completion again, and are redoubling their efforts to increase the number of graduates from all backgrounds," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "Given the productivity of the nonprofit private sector in graduating students - we enroll 19 percent of all students, but award 26 percent of all degrees - our institutions will be a crucial part of helping the nation reach the 2020 goal."

"For any group of students you want to follow-top students in high school, first-generation, low-income, high-income, or minority-nonprofit independent colleges have the best record of graduating students in timely fashion, thereby helping to fulfill President Obama's goal that many more Americans will have high-quality college degrees," said CIC President Richard Ekman.

In the next year, NAICU and CIC will ask all private colleges to report on their progress toward meeting self-identified goals in producing more college graduates; increasing graduation and/or retention rates; increasing success with at-risk students, and/or increasing graduates in areas of national need.  The two associations will issue a milestone report summarizing the sector's progress.  NAICU and CIC will release additional milestone reports periodically.

Quotes from Key National Policymakers

Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA)
Chairman - Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee

"President Obama has made graduating more Americans from college a national priority, and I applaud NAICU and CIC for their work to make the United States first in the world in college completion by 2020. As we reach toward the president's goal, I will continue to take every step possible to ensure that a college education and the greater skills, higher salary and better employment opportunities that it brings remains within reach of every American student."

.............................................................................................

Senator Mike Enzi (R-WY)
Ranking Member - Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee

"In a rapidly changing global economy, access to a college education is simply not enough. Increasing the competitiveness and prosperity of our workforce requires that our students complete their course of study and cross the finish line to success."

.............................................................................................

Congressman George Miller (D-CA)
Chairman - House of Representatives Education and Labor Committee

"Especially in this economy, it is clear students need all the resources we can give them to ensure they can complete college and graduate with the skills to compete in a global economy. These types of programs rightfully identify students' needs and supports them at every step along their path toward graduation. I applaud NAICU's efforts to help college students succeed while in school and after graduation."

.............................................................................................

Congressman John Kline (R-MN)
Ranking Member - House of Representatives Education and Labor Committee

"To keep America competitive, students from all backgrounds need the tools and support to succeed in postsecondary education. I applaud school-based initiatives to promote success among vulnerable populations, including those spearheaded by independent colleges and universities. Institutions of higher education know the students they serve, and they are well equipped to customize programs and services to help their students thrive."

About the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU)

NAICU is the premier advocacy association for the nation's private colleges and universities, with a membership of more than 1,000 private colleges and related associations. Member institutions include major research universities, church-related colleges, historically black colleges, traditional liberal arts and science institutions, women's colleges, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions. Nationally, over three million students attend private colleges and universities. For more information, visit www.naicu.edu.

About the Council of Independent Colleges and Universities (CIC)

CIC is an association of more than 600 independent, liberal arts colleges and universities and higher education affiliates and organizations that work together to strengthen college and university leadership, sustain high-quality education, and enhance private higher education's contributions to society. To fulfill this mission, CIC provides its members with skills, tools, and knowledge that address aspects of leadership, financial management and performance, academic quality, and institutional visibility. For more information, visit http://www.cic.edu/.

###

CONTACTS:
Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu
office: (202) 739-0474 cell: (202) 288-9333
Twitter: @naicutweets

Roland King, roland@naicu.edu
office: (202) 739-0475 cell: (202) 380-8172

September 23, 2010

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Proposed Rule Links Federal Student Aid to Loan Repayment Rates and Debt-to-Earnings Levels for Career College Graduates

Proposed Rule Links Federal Student Aid to Loan Repayment Rates and...

July 23, 2010

The Obama Administration released today its proposed regulations requiring for-profit career colleges to better prepare students for "gainful employment" or risk losing access to federal student aid. The proposed rules seek to protect students from taking on unsustainable debt they cannot repay and to protect taxpayers from high loan default rates.
The Obama Administration released today its proposed regulations requiring for-profit career colleges to better prepare students for "gainful employment" or risk losing access to federal student aid. The proposed rules seek to protect students from taking on unsustainable debt they cannot repay and to protect taxpayers from high loan default rates.

July 23, 2010

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About the items posted on the NAICU site: News items, features, and opinion pieces posted on this site from sources outside NAICU do not necessarily reflect the position of the association or its members. Rather, this content reflects the diversity of issues and views that are shaping American higher education.

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