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Sister Kathleen Ross Selected to Receive 2010 Paley Award for Service to Independent Higher Education

Sister Kathleen Ross Selected to Receive 2010 Paley Award for Servi...

February 02, 2010

WASHINGTON, D.C.— Sister Kathleen Ross, founding president of Heritage University, has been selected by the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) to receive the 2010 Henry Paley Memorial Award.  She will receive the award from NAICU President David L. Warren on Tuesday, Feb.2, at the NAICU annual meeting.  The meeting will be held at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.
 
Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education.  The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States.  The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984.
 
Heritage University was created in 1981, by two Yakama women who persuaded Ross to join them as founding president. Since then, Heritage has grown and succeeded in its mission "to provide quality, accessible higher education to multicultural populations which have been educationally isolated." Located on the Yakama reservation, the university's home town of Toppenish is abundant in those who traditionally would find it difficult or impossible to earn a college degree - immigrants, Native Americans, first generation college students and students from low-income families.
 
“Within the realm of independent higher education, Sister Kathleen stands as a true pioneer,” said NAICU President David L. Warren.  “The association is privileged to award her the 24th annual Henry Paley Award in recognition of her exemplary service to underserved students, and her leadership in inspiring others to reach out to the forgotten,”
 
Last March, Ross announced that she would begin the transition to new leadership for Heritage. Upon retiring from the Heritage presidency at the end of the academic year, she will head a new national institute based at the university, and dedicated to improving the success of first-generation college students.
 
NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education.  With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll nine out of every 10 students attending private institutions.  They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.  
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.— Sister Kathleen Ross, founding president of Heritage University, has been selected by the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) to receive the 2010 Henry Paley Memorial Award.  She will receive the award from NAICU President David L. Warren on Tuesday, Feb.2, at the NAICU annual meeting.  The meeting will be held at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.
 
Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education.  The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States.  The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984.
 
Heritage University was created in 1981, by two Yakama women who persuaded Ross to join them as founding president. Since then, Heritage has grown and succeeded in its mission "to provide quality, accessible higher education to multicultural populations which have been educationally isolated." Located on the Yakama reservation, the university's home town of Toppenish is abundant in those who traditionally would find it difficult or impossible to earn a college degree - immigrants, Native Americans, first generation college students and students from low-income families.
 
“Within the realm of independent higher education, Sister Kathleen stands as a true pioneer,” said NAICU President David L. Warren.  “The association is privileged to award her the 24th annual Henry Paley Award in recognition of her exemplary service to underserved students, and her leadership in inspiring others to reach out to the forgotten,”
 
Last March, Ross announced that she would begin the transition to new leadership for Heritage. Upon retiring from the Heritage presidency at the end of the academic year, she will head a new national institute based at the university, and dedicated to improving the success of first-generation college students.
 
NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education.  With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll nine out of every 10 students attending private institutions.  They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.  
 

February 02, 2010

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U-CAN College Information Web Site Updated With Fall 2009 Data

U-CAN College Information Web Site Updated With Fall 2009 Data

January 06, 2010

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
January 6, 2010

CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu
office: 202-739-0474 cell: 202-288-9333


U-CAN College Information Web Site Updated With Fall 2009 Data

WASHINGTON, D.C.-U-CAN, a consumer information Web site for students considering private, nonprofit colleges and universities, has unveiled newly updated data for hundreds of institutions. The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) developed and maintains U-CAN (University & College Accountability Network).

The updated Web site includes the most recent information available in areas important to prospective students and their families, including admissions, enrollment, cost of attendance, student aid, faculty, and more.

This is the third update to U-CAN since the Web site launched in September 2007. In addition to the new data, U-CAN offers 147 searchable fields and 25 "clickable" buttons that link to additional information found on individual campus Web sites.

"Many families are overwhelmed by the college search process, and don't believe they are getting the information and guidance necessary to make an informed choice," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "U-CAN helps prospective students and their families make sense of the facts they need to find the best college fit."

Since 2007, the number of private colleges and universities signed up to participate has grown from 600 to 808 institutions. The site has had over one million visitors, and reached 2 million page views this week.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
January 6, 2010

CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu
office: 202-739-0474 cell: 202-288-9333


U-CAN College Information Web Site Updated With Fall 2009 Data

WASHINGTON, D.C.-U-CAN, a consumer information Web site for students considering private, nonprofit colleges and universities, has unveiled newly updated data for hundreds of institutions. The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) developed and maintains U-CAN (University & College Accountability Network).

The updated Web site includes the most recent information available in areas important to prospective students and their families, including admissions, enrollment, cost of attendance, student aid, faculty, and more.

This is the third update to U-CAN since the Web site launched in September 2007. In addition to the new data, U-CAN offers 147 searchable fields and 25 "clickable" buttons that link to additional information found on individual campus Web sites.

"Many families are overwhelmed by the college search process, and don't believe they are getting the information and guidance necessary to make an informed choice," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "U-CAN helps prospective students and their families make sense of the facts they need to find the best college fit."

Since 2007, the number of private colleges and universities signed up to participate has grown from 600 to 808 institutions. The site has had over one million visitors, and reached 2 million page views this week.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

 

January 06, 2010

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Sallie Mae Fights for Student-Loan Role in a Campaign That's All About Jobs

Sallie Mae Fights for Student-Loan Role in a Campaign That's All Ab...

November 22, 2009

Sallie Mae lobbied Congress and put forward its own proposal for overhauling the federal student-loan system. After the House vote didn't go their way, the student-loan giant began drumming up grass-roots opposition to the legislation in the towns where its largest facilities are located. If bank-based lending ends, Sallie Mae employees told their neighbors and friends, the company would face a major downsizing. The question is whether the argument, and the 186,092 signatures gathered nationwide in the just-ended petition campaign, will be enough to change the outcome when the Senate takes up the measure,

Sallie Mae lobbied Congress and put forward its own proposal for overhauling the federal student-loan system. After the House vote didn't go their way, the student-loan giant began drumming up grass-roots opposition to the legislation in the towns where its largest facilities are located. If bank-based lending ends, Sallie Mae employees told their neighbors and friends, the company would face a major downsizing. The question is whether the argument, and the 186,092 signatures gathered nationwide in the just-ended petition campaign, will be enough to change the outcome when the Senate takes up the measure,

November 22, 2009

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NAICU Statement on 2009 College Board Tuition and Student Aid Reports

NAICU Statement on 2009 College Board Tuition and Student Aid Reports

October 20, 2009

Statement by NAICU President David L. Warren on the College Board's 2009 Trends in College Pricing and Student Aid Reports

The College Board today reports that tuition and fees at private, nonprofit colleges and universities increased an average of 4.4 percent for 2009-10. The finding is in line with the results of NAICU's 2009-10 tuition survey, released in June 2009, which found that tuition and fees at private, nonprofit institutions rose at an average of 4.3 percent-the smallest increase in 37 years. At the same time, NAICU found that private colleges and universities increased institutional student aid by 9 percent for 2009-10. According to the U.S. Department of Education, 81 percent of full-time, dependent students at private colleges receive institutional grant aid.

Private college and university leaders understand the financial challenges facing students, and have taken substantial steps to keep their institutions affordable to families hit hard by the recession, despite significant institutional budgetary pressures. Many private colleges are reporting that endowment values fell 20 percent to 30 percent during the 2008-09 fiscal year; fund raising across higher education was projected to decline 3.9 percent during the 2008-09 academic year; and student financial need jumped sharply, with the number of students applying for federal student aid this year up 20 percent over the 2008-09 academic year.

To help students hit hard by the recession, private institutions cut deeply into several areas of their budgets and used the savings to boost student financial aid and temper tuition increases. Freezes and cuts in staff salaries and benefits, construction and renovation projects, and travel and other staff expenses were common.

An unprecedented number of creative campus affordability measures were launched by private colleges this year. These include:

• Holding tuition increases to historical lows;
• Cutting or freezing tuition;
• Matching public university tuition or student aid programs;
• Introducing or expanding programs that replace loans with grants;
• Launching three-year bachelor's degree programs;
• Guaranteeing graduation within four years, and employment after graduation; and
• Offering tuition assistance for laid-off workers.

Institutional affordability efforts, coupled with increased funding for Pell Grants, Stafford Loans, and Federal Work-Study this year, have help to keep private, nonprofit higher education an affordable option to students from all backgrounds. Enrollment at our institutions was projected to increase slightly for fall 2009, exceeding earlier expectations, according to a NAICU survey released in July. Since September, many private institutions have announced record, near-record, or otherwise successful enrollments this year.

It is too early to predict whether this year's historically low tuition increase will be matched, or lower, next year, as independent institutions struggle to make up for lost revenue, keep up with growing student demand for financial aid, and balance their budgets.

Nevertheless, private colleges and universities will continue to work creatively to maintain their affordability. Several new announcements have already come this month. For instance, Culver-Stockton College plans to freeze all annual costs for 2010-11; Barry University is cutting tuition for its adult and continuing education programs by 20 percent for displaced workers; and the University of San Francisco will offer general education classes at a 50-percent discount, beginning in January 2010.

No student should rule out private higher education because of published price. Because of our commitment to student aid, four-year private colleges and universities enroll virtually the same percentage of students from low- and middle-income families, as four-year public institutions. With our higher graduation rates, and median student debt similar to four-year public colleges, private, nonprofit colleges are still a great value for students from all backgrounds.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

###

Statement by NAICU President David L. Warren on the College Board's 2009 Trends in College Pricing and Student Aid Reports

The College Board today reports that tuition and fees at private, nonprofit colleges and universities increased an average of 4.4 percent for 2009-10. The finding is in line with the results of NAICU's 2009-10 tuition survey, released in June 2009, which found that tuition and fees at private, nonprofit institutions rose at an average of 4.3 percent-the smallest increase in 37 years. At the same time, NAICU found that private colleges and universities increased institutional student aid by 9 percent for 2009-10. According to the U.S. Department of Education, 81 percent of full-time, dependent students at private colleges receive institutional grant aid.

Private college and university leaders understand the financial challenges facing students, and have taken substantial steps to keep their institutions affordable to families hit hard by the recession, despite significant institutional budgetary pressures. Many private colleges are reporting that endowment values fell 20 percent to 30 percent during the 2008-09 fiscal year; fund raising across higher education was projected to decline 3.9 percent during the 2008-09 academic year; and student financial need jumped sharply, with the number of students applying for federal student aid this year up 20 percent over the 2008-09 academic year.

To help students hit hard by the recession, private institutions cut deeply into several areas of their budgets and used the savings to boost student financial aid and temper tuition increases. Freezes and cuts in staff salaries and benefits, construction and renovation projects, and travel and other staff expenses were common.

An unprecedented number of creative campus affordability measures were launched by private colleges this year. These include:

• Holding tuition increases to historical lows;
• Cutting or freezing tuition;
• Matching public university tuition or student aid programs;
• Introducing or expanding programs that replace loans with grants;
• Launching three-year bachelor's degree programs;
• Guaranteeing graduation within four years, and employment after graduation; and
• Offering tuition assistance for laid-off workers.

Institutional affordability efforts, coupled with increased funding for Pell Grants, Stafford Loans, and Federal Work-Study this year, have help to keep private, nonprofit higher education an affordable option to students from all backgrounds. Enrollment at our institutions was projected to increase slightly for fall 2009, exceeding earlier expectations, according to a NAICU survey released in July. Since September, many private institutions have announced record, near-record, or otherwise successful enrollments this year.

It is too early to predict whether this year's historically low tuition increase will be matched, or lower, next year, as independent institutions struggle to make up for lost revenue, keep up with growing student demand for financial aid, and balance their budgets.

Nevertheless, private colleges and universities will continue to work creatively to maintain their affordability. Several new announcements have already come this month. For instance, Culver-Stockton College plans to freeze all annual costs for 2010-11; Barry University is cutting tuition for its adult and continuing education programs by 20 percent for displaced workers; and the University of San Francisco will offer general education classes at a 50-percent discount, beginning in January 2010.

No student should rule out private higher education because of published price. Because of our commitment to student aid, four-year private colleges and universities enroll virtually the same percentage of students from low- and middle-income families, as four-year public institutions. With our higher graduation rates, and median student debt similar to four-year public colleges, private, nonprofit colleges are still a great value for students from all backgrounds.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

###

October 20, 2009

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Private College Enrollment Projected to Hold Steady for Fall 2009

Private College Enrollment Projected to Hold Steady for Fall 2009

July 20, 2009

Multiple Campus Steps Taken to Maintain Affordability for Students

Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu
office: 202-739-0474 cell: 202-288-9333

Click here to view detailed results.

WASHINGTON, DC, July 20 -- A survey of nearly 300 private, nonprofit colleges and universities finds that undergraduate enrollment for fall 2009 is projected to increase slightly-by an average of 0.2 percent-over fall 2008. Overall student enrollment (undergraduate and graduate students) at these institutions is projected to increase by 0.1 percent over fall 2008.

Increased funding for Pell Grants and other federal student aid programs was widely credited for helping to maintain student educational choice, while more generous institutional student aid policies; lower-than-usual tuition increases; salary and hiring freezes; and more flexible admissions practices were commonly cited campus responses to the economic downturn.

"The nation's students and families are facing unprecedented financial challenges, and many are struggling to afford college without taking on excessive debt," said David L. Warren, president of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities. "Private college presidents are aware of the difficulties facing consumers, and are doing what they can within their institutional means to enhance affordability.

"Recent increases in federal student aid have made a huge difference for our students," Warren said. "We thank Congress, the Obama administration, and the American people for helping students during these challenging times. There still are difficult days ahead for many students, and their institutions of higher education, but the federal government's actions this past year have given consumers a reason for hope."

Survey Highlights

  • Undergraduate enrollment at private, nonprofit colleges and universities for fall 2009 is projected to increase slightly-by an average of 0.2 percent-over fall 2008.*

  • Nearly 57 percent of responding institutions reported an increase or no change in paid deposits, by May 15, for fall enrollment compared to last year.*

  • Majorities projected an increase or no change in new undergraduate students (67.9 percent), returning undergraduate students (74.3 percent), and transfer undergraduate students (76.5 percent) for the fall term compared to last year.*

  • A majority of respondents accepted a higher number of regular applicants versus last year. More than one-third accepted late applications or extended the recruiting cycle.

  • More than 90 percent of responding institutions said Pell Grant and Stafford Loan increases had a positive impact on their students. Two-thirds reported that Federal Work-Study increases were helpful or very helpful.

  • More than half of responding institutions reported they increased tuition for 2009-10 at less than their historical average. Nearly 30 percent said they increased tuition at lower-than-expected rates. Five percent froze tuition at the previous year's rate.

  • Eight in 10 responding institutions reported an increase in fall 2009 student aid applications versus fall 2008.

  • A majority of institutions reported they responded more positively to more student aid appeals, and increased the size of institutional aid awards. More than three-quarters of respondents reported they increased institutional aid awards over last year. Only five percent reported smaller institutional awards.

  • Three-quarters of responding institutions reported an increase in federal grants in aid packages, and nearly half reported a decrease in expected family contribution levels.

  • Slightly more than half of respondents reported in increase in federal student loans in aid packages, and nearly a third reported an increase in private loans.

  • Nearly 40 percent of responding institutions report that due to the recession, they had students stop out of school in the 2008-09 academic year or for the fall 2009 term. One-fourth of responding institutions reported they had students switch to part-time status. Slightly more than half reported they had students who are working more hours or borrowing more through private sources.

  • About half of the responding institutions that increased institutional aid to students for fall 2009 reported they generated funds through increased tuition revenue and cuts in other institutional budget areas. Other means for boosting institutional student aid funds included increasing fund raising/gift revenue and drawing down more funds from endowments.

  • Approximately half of the responding institutions reported they froze salaries and new hiring. About 40 percent reported they restricted staff travel and slowed down current construction and renovation projects. Approximately one-third delayed maintenance and gave smaller-than-usual salary increases.

* Projected and actual fall 2009 enrollment figures may differ more than in previous years, given the unusually unpredictable admissions season.

Detailed Summary of Findings:
Click here for a detailed summary of findings, as well as the full survey report (including qualitative campus responses).

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

###

Multiple Campus Steps Taken to Maintain Affordability for Students

Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu
office: 202-739-0474 cell: 202-288-9333

Click here to view detailed results.

WASHINGTON, DC, July 20 -- A survey of nearly 300 private, nonprofit colleges and universities finds that undergraduate enrollment for fall 2009 is projected to increase slightly-by an average of 0.2 percent-over fall 2008. Overall student enrollment (undergraduate and graduate students) at these institutions is projected to increase by 0.1 percent over fall 2008.

Increased funding for Pell Grants and other federal student aid programs was widely credited for helping to maintain student educational choice, while more generous institutional student aid policies; lower-than-usual tuition increases; salary and hiring freezes; and more flexible admissions practices were commonly cited campus responses to the economic downturn.

"The nation's students and families are facing unprecedented financial challenges, and many are struggling to afford college without taking on excessive debt," said David L. Warren, president of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities. "Private college presidents are aware of the difficulties facing consumers, and are doing what they can within their institutional means to enhance affordability.

"Recent increases in federal student aid have made a huge difference for our students," Warren said. "We thank Congress, the Obama administration, and the American people for helping students during these challenging times. There still are difficult days ahead for many students, and their institutions of higher education, but the federal government's actions this past year have given consumers a reason for hope."

Survey Highlights

  • Undergraduate enrollment at private, nonprofit colleges and universities for fall 2009 is projected to increase slightly-by an average of 0.2 percent-over fall 2008.*

  • Nearly 57 percent of responding institutions reported an increase or no change in paid deposits, by May 15, for fall enrollment compared to last year.*

  • Majorities projected an increase or no change in new undergraduate students (67.9 percent), returning undergraduate students (74.3 percent), and transfer undergraduate students (76.5 percent) for the fall term compared to last year.*

  • A majority of respondents accepted a higher number of regular applicants versus last year. More than one-third accepted late applications or extended the recruiting cycle.

  • More than 90 percent of responding institutions said Pell Grant and Stafford Loan increases had a positive impact on their students. Two-thirds reported that Federal Work-Study increases were helpful or very helpful.

  • More than half of responding institutions reported they increased tuition for 2009-10 at less than their historical average. Nearly 30 percent said they increased tuition at lower-than-expected rates. Five percent froze tuition at the previous year's rate.

  • Eight in 10 responding institutions reported an increase in fall 2009 student aid applications versus fall 2008.

  • A majority of institutions reported they responded more positively to more student aid appeals, and increased the size of institutional aid awards. More than three-quarters of respondents reported they increased institutional aid awards over last year. Only five percent reported smaller institutional awards.

  • Three-quarters of responding institutions reported an increase in federal grants in aid packages, and nearly half reported a decrease in expected family contribution levels.

  • Slightly more than half of respondents reported in increase in federal student loans in aid packages, and nearly a third reported an increase in private loans.

  • Nearly 40 percent of responding institutions report that due to the recession, they had students stop out of school in the 2008-09 academic year or for the fall 2009 term. One-fourth of responding institutions reported they had students switch to part-time status. Slightly more than half reported they had students who are working more hours or borrowing more through private sources.

  • About half of the responding institutions that increased institutional aid to students for fall 2009 reported they generated funds through increased tuition revenue and cuts in other institutional budget areas. Other means for boosting institutional student aid funds included increasing fund raising/gift revenue and drawing down more funds from endowments.

  • Approximately half of the responding institutions reported they froze salaries and new hiring. About 40 percent reported they restricted staff travel and slowed down current construction and renovation projects. Approximately one-third delayed maintenance and gave smaller-than-usual salary increases.

* Projected and actual fall 2009 enrollment figures may differ more than in previous years, given the unusually unpredictable admissions season.

Detailed Summary of Findings:
Click here for a detailed summary of findings, as well as the full survey report (including qualitative campus responses).

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

###

July 20, 2009

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About the items posted on the NAICU site: News items, features, and opinion pieces posted on this site from sources outside NAICU do not necessarily reflect the position of the association or its members. Rather, this content reflects the diversity of issues and views that are shaping American higher education.

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