News from NAICU

  • refine by:
X

NAICU Presents U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN) with the 2014 Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education

NAICU Presents U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN) with the 2014 Aw...

February 04, 2014

Warren Alexander McArdell

Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN) accepts the 2014 Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education from NAICU President David L. Warren (left) and  Sewanee: The University of the South Vice Chancellor and President John M. McCardell, Jr. (right).

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN) received the 2014 Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education today from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). 

The award was presented by NAICU President David L. Warren and Sewanee: The University of the South Vice Chancellor and President John M. McCardell, Jr., at NAICU’s 2014 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

The NAICU Advocacy Award was established in 1993 to recognize individuals outside of academe who have championed the cause of independent nonprofit higher education.  No single contribution makes one eligible to receive the award.  Instead, it recognizes an extended record of service, initiative, and determination.

In prepared remarks, Sen. Alexander decried the level of regulation faced by all colleges and universities.

"Despite well-meaning intentions over the years, our system has become too complicated and burdensome," he said.  "It wastes time, and time and dollars that ought to be spent helping students."

He went on to discuss the bipartisan call for a new National Research Council task force to conduct a study on the overregulation of higher education and the $1 million in funding secured for the project.

He also asked the assembly NAICU presidens for their help.

"I want to reverse this trend of piling on layer after layer," he said. "The task force needs to hear specific examples of rules and regulations tha are no longer needed, overly burdensome, costly, and confusing."

The task force, headquartered at the American Council on Education, has scheduled an organizational meeting for next week.

As a former governor, university president, education secretary, businessman, and now two-term Senator, Sen. Alexander has brought an authoritative voice to the national debate on higher education policy, ensuring the future vibrancy, quality, and independence of American higher education.  As the lead Republican on the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, he is a strong and bipartisan voice for higher education institutions in Tennessee and around the country.

“Senator Alexander has lent an understanding ear to the issues and concerns of the nation’s private, nonprofit colleges and universities as well as to the students and their families,” said NAICU President David L. Warren.   “He has also been at the forefront in articulating the strength, diversity, and vitality of higher education in the United States.  Of particular importance to private independent institutions, he recognizes that autonomy and diversity are two qualities that have made our system the envy of the world.”

During the past 11 years in Congress, Sen. Alexander has given strong support to the Pell Grant, recognizing its value in promoting a student’s choice of institutions.  At the same time, he has been relentless in his efforts to identify and limit the burgeoning federal regulations that contribute to rising college costs.

“With reauthorization of the Higher Education Act on the Congressional agenda, Sen. Alexander will continue to play a key role in shaping the future of higher education in America,” said Warren.  “His ‘flannel shirt’ pragmatism and hands-on experience will serve as an important balance to the many theories of how colleges and universities might be ‘reformed.”

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

The NAICU Advocacy Award was established to recognize individuals outside of academe who have championed the cause of independent higher education.  Whether in government, business, or philanthropy, the winner of this award has provided leadership, established resources, or enacted policy at the state or national level that recognized the role of independent colleges and universities in serving public purposes.  No single contribution makes one eligible to receive the award.  Instead, it recognizes a lifetime of service, initiative, and determination.

Previous Award Recipients

2013     Arnold L. Mitchem, President, Council for Opportunity in Education
2012    The United Technologies Corporation, accepted by UTC Chairman and CEO Louis Chênevert
2011    The Honorable Timothy H.  Bishop, U.S. House of Representatives
2010    The Honorable George Miller, United States House of Representatives
2009    The Honorable John W. Warner, U.S. Senate
2008    The Honorable Ralph Regula, U. S. House of Representatives
2007    Loren Pope, College Placement Counselor and Author, Colleges That Change Lives
2006    The Honorable Philip S. English, U.S. House of Representatives
2005    The Honorable Thomas H.  Kean, President, Drew University; Chair, The National Commission on Terrorist
           Attacks Upon the United States; and Former Governor of New Jersey
2004    The Honorable Chuck Grassley, U.S. Senate
2003    The Honorable Dale E.  Kildee, U.S. House of Representatives
2002    The Honorable Howard P. “Buck” McKeon, U. S. House of Representatives
2001    The Honorable David R. Obey, U.S. House of Representatives
2000    The Honorable Arlen Specter, U.S. Senate
1999    The Honorable Claiborne Pell, U.S. Senate
1998    The Honorable William Roth, U.S. Senate
1997    The Honorable Richard Riley, U.S. Secretary of Education
1996    (Special Summit Meeting – no award was given)
1995    The Honorable Robert Stafford, U.S. Senate
1994    The Honorable Tom Harkin, U.S. Senate
1993    The Honorable Terry Sanford, U.S. Senate

Warren Alexander McArdell

Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN) accepts the 2014 Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education from NAICU President David L. Warren (left) and  Sewanee: The University of the South Vice Chancellor and President John M. McCardell, Jr. (right).

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN) received the 2014 Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education today from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). 

The award was presented by NAICU President David L. Warren and Sewanee: The University of the South Vice Chancellor and President John M. McCardell, Jr., at NAICU’s 2014 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

The NAICU Advocacy Award was established in 1993 to recognize individuals outside of academe who have championed the cause of independent nonprofit higher education.  No single contribution makes one eligible to receive the award.  Instead, it recognizes an extended record of service, initiative, and determination.

In prepared remarks, Sen. Alexander decried the level of regulation faced by all colleges and universities.

"Despite well-meaning intentions over the years, our system has become too complicated and burdensome," he said.  "It wastes time, and time and dollars that ought to be spent helping students."

He went on to discuss the bipartisan call for a new National Research Council task force to conduct a study on the overregulation of higher education and the $1 million in funding secured for the project.

He also asked the assembly NAICU presidens for their help.

"I want to reverse this trend of piling on layer after layer," he said. "The task force needs to hear specific examples of rules and regulations tha are no longer needed, overly burdensome, costly, and confusing."

The task force, headquartered at the American Council on Education, has scheduled an organizational meeting for next week.

As a former governor, university president, education secretary, businessman, and now two-term Senator, Sen. Alexander has brought an authoritative voice to the national debate on higher education policy, ensuring the future vibrancy, quality, and independence of American higher education.  As the lead Republican on the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, he is a strong and bipartisan voice for higher education institutions in Tennessee and around the country.

“Senator Alexander has lent an understanding ear to the issues and concerns of the nation’s private, nonprofit colleges and universities as well as to the students and their families,” said NAICU President David L. Warren.   “He has also been at the forefront in articulating the strength, diversity, and vitality of higher education in the United States.  Of particular importance to private independent institutions, he recognizes that autonomy and diversity are two qualities that have made our system the envy of the world.”

During the past 11 years in Congress, Sen. Alexander has given strong support to the Pell Grant, recognizing its value in promoting a student’s choice of institutions.  At the same time, he has been relentless in his efforts to identify and limit the burgeoning federal regulations that contribute to rising college costs.

“With reauthorization of the Higher Education Act on the Congressional agenda, Sen. Alexander will continue to play a key role in shaping the future of higher education in America,” said Warren.  “His ‘flannel shirt’ pragmatism and hands-on experience will serve as an important balance to the many theories of how colleges and universities might be ‘reformed.”

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

The NAICU Advocacy Award was established to recognize individuals outside of academe who have championed the cause of independent higher education.  Whether in government, business, or philanthropy, the winner of this award has provided leadership, established resources, or enacted policy at the state or national level that recognized the role of independent colleges and universities in serving public purposes.  No single contribution makes one eligible to receive the award.  Instead, it recognizes a lifetime of service, initiative, and determination.

Previous Award Recipients

2013     Arnold L. Mitchem, President, Council for Opportunity in Education
2012    The United Technologies Corporation, accepted by UTC Chairman and CEO Louis Chênevert
2011    The Honorable Timothy H.  Bishop, U.S. House of Representatives
2010    The Honorable George Miller, United States House of Representatives
2009    The Honorable John W. Warner, U.S. Senate
2008    The Honorable Ralph Regula, U. S. House of Representatives
2007    Loren Pope, College Placement Counselor and Author, Colleges That Change Lives
2006    The Honorable Philip S. English, U.S. House of Representatives
2005    The Honorable Thomas H.  Kean, President, Drew University; Chair, The National Commission on Terrorist
           Attacks Upon the United States; and Former Governor of New Jersey
2004    The Honorable Chuck Grassley, U.S. Senate
2003    The Honorable Dale E.  Kildee, U.S. House of Representatives
2002    The Honorable Howard P. “Buck” McKeon, U. S. House of Representatives
2001    The Honorable David R. Obey, U.S. House of Representatives
2000    The Honorable Arlen Specter, U.S. Senate
1999    The Honorable Claiborne Pell, U.S. Senate
1998    The Honorable William Roth, U.S. Senate
1997    The Honorable Richard Riley, U.S. Secretary of Education
1996    (Special Summit Meeting – no award was given)
1995    The Honorable Robert Stafford, U.S. Senate
1994    The Honorable Tom Harkin, U.S. Senate
1993    The Honorable Terry Sanford, U.S. Senate

February 04, 2014

show article

read full article


X

Legal Volunteers Receive 2014 Paley Award for Service to Independent Higher Education

Legal Volunteers Receive 2014 Paley Award for Service to Independen...

February 04, 2014

WASHINGTON, D.C.  — The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) Legal Services Review Panel is the recipient of the 2014 Henry Paley Memorial Award, presented today during the Association’s 2014 Annual Meeting. The meeting is being held in Washington, D.C., at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education.  The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States.  The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984.

The NAICU Legal Services Review Panel evaluates emerging legal issues, precedent-setting litigation, and the decisions of federal regulatory bodies and advises Association leaders and members on the implications for private, nonprofit higher education.  The volunteer panel is comprised of university general counsels, senior college administrators, and state association executives who also are lawyers.

“For more than 35 years, the Legal Services Review Panel has profoundly shaped American higher education and, in particular, the role of private nonprofit colleges and universities in society,” said NAICU President David L. Warren.  “Collectively, panel members have donated literally thousands of hours of legal consultation and advice in service to the Association and to the students and leaders of private colleges and universities.”

At its founding in the mid-1970s, NAICU’s primary mission was to serve as a more effective voice for independent colleges and universities. At the time, the federal government’s role in higher education was becoming more assertive. Federal policy was beginning to shape a growing number of issues vital to these institutions, initially through legislation. Soon, though, NAICU leaders realized that the courts and regulatory agencies were also increasingly involved in the affairs of colleges and universities. For NAICU members, these presented new and different challenges to their essential mission and independence.

Clearly, the leaders of the new association needed help. They turned to a group of legal experts that over time became the Legal Services Review Panel. Some of the panel’s most valuable advice has been in deciding which of the multitude of legal issues the association should address, and then determining the strategy and timing of NAICU’s interventions.

The panel’s advice to NAICU has covered a broad range of issues that continues to expand today. Arguably most important were those involving academic freedom and cases that would impinge on the special status of independent institutions. Other key issues include the protection of student records and privacy; the impact of Title IX on men’s and women’s athletics; and the long battle over affirmative action as the Bakke case moved toward the Supreme Court

Philip Moot, who served as chair of the panel for more than 30 years before retiring five years ago, accepted the award on behalf of the panel’s volunteers.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

 

Previous Award Recipients

Named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984, the award recognizes an individual who embodies his spirit of unfailing service toward the students and faculty of independent higher education.  The winner of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States.

2013    Bernard Fryshman, Executive Vice President, Association of Advanced Rabbinical and Talmudic Schools
2012    Patricia A. McGuire, President, Trinity Washington University
2011    The Rev. Charles L. Currie, S.J., President, Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities
2010    Sister Kathleen Ross, snjm, Heritage University
2009    Morgan Odell, Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities
2008    The Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., University of Notre Dame
2007    Alexander W. (Sandy) Astin, Higher Education Research Institute, University of California
2006    Clare Cotton, The Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Massachusetts
2005    Robert N.  Kelly, Kansas Independent College Association
2004    Michael S.  McPherson, Spencer Foundation, Macalester College
2003    James C.  Ross, Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York
2002    Allen P. Splete, Council of Independent Colleges
2001    (Special NAICU 25th Anniversary Meeting recognizing all previous recipients – no new award was given)
2000    Sr. Mary Andrew Matesich, Ohio Dominican College
1999    David Irwin, Washington Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
1998    Rev. William J. Sullivan, Seattle University
1997    James Whalen, Ithaca College
1996    John Frazer, Association of Independent Kentucky Colleges and Universities
1995    Richard F. Rosser, National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
1994    Sr. Dorothy Ann Kelly, College of New Rochelle
1993    Derek Bok, Harvard University
1992    (Special Summit Meeting – no award was given)
1991    Francis "Mike" Michelini, Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Pennsylvania
1990    The Honorable Silvio Conte, U.S. House of Representatives
1989    The Honorable Thomas H. Kean, Governor, New Jersey
1988    The Honorable William H. Natcher, U.S. House of Representatives
1987    Frank "Sandy" Tredinnick, Association of Independent Colleges and Universities in Massachusetts
1986    James Ream, Pennsylvania Association of Colleges and Universities
1985    Rev. Timothy S. Healy, Georgetown University

WASHINGTON, D.C.  — The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) Legal Services Review Panel is the recipient of the 2014 Henry Paley Memorial Award, presented today during the Association’s 2014 Annual Meeting. The meeting is being held in Washington, D.C., at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education.  The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States.  The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984.

The NAICU Legal Services Review Panel evaluates emerging legal issues, precedent-setting litigation, and the decisions of federal regulatory bodies and advises Association leaders and members on the implications for private, nonprofit higher education.  The volunteer panel is comprised of university general counsels, senior college administrators, and state association executives who also are lawyers.

“For more than 35 years, the Legal Services Review Panel has profoundly shaped American higher education and, in particular, the role of private nonprofit colleges and universities in society,” said NAICU President David L. Warren.  “Collectively, panel members have donated literally thousands of hours of legal consultation and advice in service to the Association and to the students and leaders of private colleges and universities.”

At its founding in the mid-1970s, NAICU’s primary mission was to serve as a more effective voice for independent colleges and universities. At the time, the federal government’s role in higher education was becoming more assertive. Federal policy was beginning to shape a growing number of issues vital to these institutions, initially through legislation. Soon, though, NAICU leaders realized that the courts and regulatory agencies were also increasingly involved in the affairs of colleges and universities. For NAICU members, these presented new and different challenges to their essential mission and independence.

Clearly, the leaders of the new association needed help. They turned to a group of legal experts that over time became the Legal Services Review Panel. Some of the panel’s most valuable advice has been in deciding which of the multitude of legal issues the association should address, and then determining the strategy and timing of NAICU’s interventions.

The panel’s advice to NAICU has covered a broad range of issues that continues to expand today. Arguably most important were those involving academic freedom and cases that would impinge on the special status of independent institutions. Other key issues include the protection of student records and privacy; the impact of Title IX on men’s and women’s athletics; and the long battle over affirmative action as the Bakke case moved toward the Supreme Court

Philip Moot, who served as chair of the panel for more than 30 years before retiring five years ago, accepted the award on behalf of the panel’s volunteers.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

 

Previous Award Recipients

Named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984, the award recognizes an individual who embodies his spirit of unfailing service toward the students and faculty of independent higher education.  The winner of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States.

2013    Bernard Fryshman, Executive Vice President, Association of Advanced Rabbinical and Talmudic Schools
2012    Patricia A. McGuire, President, Trinity Washington University
2011    The Rev. Charles L. Currie, S.J., President, Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities
2010    Sister Kathleen Ross, snjm, Heritage University
2009    Morgan Odell, Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities
2008    The Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., University of Notre Dame
2007    Alexander W. (Sandy) Astin, Higher Education Research Institute, University of California
2006    Clare Cotton, The Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Massachusetts
2005    Robert N.  Kelly, Kansas Independent College Association
2004    Michael S.  McPherson, Spencer Foundation, Macalester College
2003    James C.  Ross, Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York
2002    Allen P. Splete, Council of Independent Colleges
2001    (Special NAICU 25th Anniversary Meeting recognizing all previous recipients – no new award was given)
2000    Sr. Mary Andrew Matesich, Ohio Dominican College
1999    David Irwin, Washington Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
1998    Rev. William J. Sullivan, Seattle University
1997    James Whalen, Ithaca College
1996    John Frazer, Association of Independent Kentucky Colleges and Universities
1995    Richard F. Rosser, National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
1994    Sr. Dorothy Ann Kelly, College of New Rochelle
1993    Derek Bok, Harvard University
1992    (Special Summit Meeting – no award was given)
1991    Francis "Mike" Michelini, Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Pennsylvania
1990    The Honorable Silvio Conte, U.S. House of Representatives
1989    The Honorable Thomas H. Kean, Governor, New Jersey
1988    The Honorable William H. Natcher, U.S. House of Representatives
1987    Frank "Sandy" Tredinnick, Association of Independent Colleges and Universities in Massachusetts
1986    James Ream, Pennsylvania Association of Colleges and Universities
1985    Rev. Timothy S. Healy, Georgetown University

February 04, 2014

show article

read full article


X

NAICU President David Warren Statement on White House Summit on College Opportunity

NAICU President David Warren Statement on White House Summit on Col...

January 16, 2014

WASHINGTON, DC  (January 16, 2014) – President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama today convened a national summit on enhancing college opportunity for low income students.  More than 140 leaders from public and private colleges and universities, corporations, foundations, non-profit groups attended the event and made organizational commitments to launch or expand new programs designed to meet the President’s goal of increasing college opportunities for disadvantaged students.

NAICU President David Warren attended with summit along with more than 60 presidents from private, nonprofit colleges and universities. Following the event, he said:

“Today the President and First Lady focused the nation’s attention on the need to increase opportunities to attend and complete college for students from low income families.  This is an important economic competitiveness issue for the nation and a transformative issue for these students and their families.”

“America’s private, nonprofit colleges and universities have a legacy of providing access to higher education for students from all economic backgrounds.  In recent years, many campuses have stepped up their efforts to reach out to disadvantaged students seeking to achieve their dreams of a college education.  Many of these efforts are part of NAICU’s Building Blocks to 2020 initiative.”

"Helping all students select the college that best fits their intellectual, professional, and extracurricular interests; values and personality; and financial circumstances is crucial to academic success.  NAICU’s U-CAN initiative features the key information on hundreds of private colleges that students and families say is important to choosing the right college.”

“We are proud of the more than 60 institutions which today announced new access and completion initiatives.  We are equally proud of the work done on a daily basis by the hundreds of private colleges working to help every student achieve their educational goals.”

 “NAICU and the nation’s private colleges and universities remain committed to working together to serve the educational needs of students and the human resource needs of the nation.  This is a national imperative.”

David L. Warren
President
NAICU

WASHINGTON, DC  (January 16, 2014) – President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama today convened a national summit on enhancing college opportunity for low income students.  More than 140 leaders from public and private colleges and universities, corporations, foundations, non-profit groups attended the event and made organizational commitments to launch or expand new programs designed to meet the President’s goal of increasing college opportunities for disadvantaged students.

NAICU President David Warren attended with summit along with more than 60 presidents from private, nonprofit colleges and universities. Following the event, he said:

“Today the President and First Lady focused the nation’s attention on the need to increase opportunities to attend and complete college for students from low income families.  This is an important economic competitiveness issue for the nation and a transformative issue for these students and their families.”

“America’s private, nonprofit colleges and universities have a legacy of providing access to higher education for students from all economic backgrounds.  In recent years, many campuses have stepped up their efforts to reach out to disadvantaged students seeking to achieve their dreams of a college education.  Many of these efforts are part of NAICU’s Building Blocks to 2020 initiative.”

"Helping all students select the college that best fits their intellectual, professional, and extracurricular interests; values and personality; and financial circumstances is crucial to academic success.  NAICU’s U-CAN initiative features the key information on hundreds of private colleges that students and families say is important to choosing the right college.”

“We are proud of the more than 60 institutions which today announced new access and completion initiatives.  We are equally proud of the work done on a daily basis by the hundreds of private colleges working to help every student achieve their educational goals.”

 “NAICU and the nation’s private colleges and universities remain committed to working together to serve the educational needs of students and the human resource needs of the nation.  This is a national imperative.”

David L. Warren
President
NAICU

January 16, 2014

show article

read full article


X

Keeping Pell on Track to Help Low-Income Americans Afford College

Keeping Pell on Track to Help Low-Income Americans Afford College

December 16, 2013

The Save Pell Coalition, of which CLASP is a member, has released new findings on the current state of the Pell Grant program and the many students who are counting on it. Key takeaways include: Pell grants have already been hit hard and students rely on Pell Grants more than ever. 

The Save Pell Coalition, of which CLASP is a member, has released new findings on the current state of the Pell Grant program and the many students who are counting on it. Key takeaways include: Pell grants have already been hit hard and students rely on Pell Grants more than ever. 

December 16, 2013

show article

read full article


X

Private College Tuition Increases at Lowest Rate in Four Decades

Private College Tuition Increases at Lowest Rate in Four Decades

October 10, 2013

Published Tuition at Private Institutions Grew an Average of 3.6 Percent for 2013-14;

Institutional Student Aid up 6.9 Percent

WASHINGTON, D.C. (October 10, 2013) — Students and families entering the nation’s private, nonprofit colleges and universities this academic year experienced the lowest tuition and fee rate increases in at least four decades.  According to an annual survey of its members, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) reports published tuition and fees increased by just 3.6 percent for the 2013-2014 academic year. At the same time, institutional student aid budgets at private colleges increased an average of 6.9 percent for 2013-14.

This is the fifth consecutive year that the percentage increase in published tuition has stayed below pre-recession rates, and the second time in at least four decades it has been below 4 percent.  From 2009-10 to 2013-14, average private college tuition increases ran in the mid-four percent range, down from an average annual increase of nearly 6 percent during the previous 10 years.  This year’s rate is the lowest NAICU has on record dating back to 1972-73 (see chart below).

“During the past five years, private colleges and universities across the nation have redoubled efforts and implemented innovative initiatives to cut their operating costs, improve their efficiency, and enhance their affordability,” said NAICU President David L. Warren.  “This, coupled with generous institutional student aid policies, has resulted in a private higher education that is accessible and affordable to students and families from all backgrounds.”

According to NAICU, data show that the average inflation-adjusted net tuition and fees (published tuition and fees minus grant aid from all sources and federal higher education tax benefits) has increased just $230, to $13,380, at private, nonprofit institutions over the past ten years.  According to the College Board, in 2012-2013, published tuition and fees averaged just over $29,000 at nonprofit colleges and universities.

Results from NAICU’s survey also show this year’s average 6.9 percent increase in institutional student aid follows increases of 6.2 percent, 7.3 percent, 6.8 percent, and 9 percent in 2012-13, 2011-12, 2010-11, and 2009-10, respectively. The NAICU survey did not collect student aid figures prior to 2009-10. 

 “Private, nonprofit colleges and universities have been and will continue to be positive investments that pay big dividends,” said Warren.  “Nearly eight-in-ten students who earned a bachelor’s degree from a four-year private institution did so in four years, graduating with manageable debt and prepared to succeed and contribute to the workforce and society.”

Tuition Cuts, Freezes, and Other Affordability Measures Spread

Since the economic downturn, private colleges have introduced creative affordability measures to keep out-of-pocket costs as low as possible for students and families. In recent years, an unprecedented number of private institutions have cut tuition, frozen tuition, announced fixed-tuition guarantees (no increases for students while they are enrolled), or introduced three-year degree programs.

Other initiatives are also spreading, including military scholarships, substantial student aid increases, loan repayment assistance programs, and articulation agreements with community colleges.

More than half (510) of NAICU’s 962 member colleges and universities responded to this year’s survey of published tuition and institutional student aid increases. NAICU member institutions enroll 90 percent of the students who attend private, nonprofit colleges and universities in the United States.  NAICU’s survey collects percentage increases in published tuition and institutional student aid budget increases, but not dollar amounts.

###

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

 

Tuition Survey Chart 2013-14

 

Published Tuition at Private Institutions Grew an Average of 3.6 Percent for 2013-14;

Institutional Student Aid up 6.9 Percent

WASHINGTON, D.C. (October 10, 2013) — Students and families entering the nation’s private, nonprofit colleges and universities this academic year experienced the lowest tuition and fee rate increases in at least four decades.  According to an annual survey of its members, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) reports published tuition and fees increased by just 3.6 percent for the 2013-2014 academic year. At the same time, institutional student aid budgets at private colleges increased an average of 6.9 percent for 2013-14.

This is the fifth consecutive year that the percentage increase in published tuition has stayed below pre-recession rates, and the second time in at least four decades it has been below 4 percent.  From 2009-10 to 2013-14, average private college tuition increases ran in the mid-four percent range, down from an average annual increase of nearly 6 percent during the previous 10 years.  This year’s rate is the lowest NAICU has on record dating back to 1972-73 (see chart below).

“During the past five years, private colleges and universities across the nation have redoubled efforts and implemented innovative initiatives to cut their operating costs, improve their efficiency, and enhance their affordability,” said NAICU President David L. Warren.  “This, coupled with generous institutional student aid policies, has resulted in a private higher education that is accessible and affordable to students and families from all backgrounds.”

According to NAICU, data show that the average inflation-adjusted net tuition and fees (published tuition and fees minus grant aid from all sources and federal higher education tax benefits) has increased just $230, to $13,380, at private, nonprofit institutions over the past ten years.  According to the College Board, in 2012-2013, published tuition and fees averaged just over $29,000 at nonprofit colleges and universities.

Results from NAICU’s survey also show this year’s average 6.9 percent increase in institutional student aid follows increases of 6.2 percent, 7.3 percent, 6.8 percent, and 9 percent in 2012-13, 2011-12, 2010-11, and 2009-10, respectively. The NAICU survey did not collect student aid figures prior to 2009-10. 

 “Private, nonprofit colleges and universities have been and will continue to be positive investments that pay big dividends,” said Warren.  “Nearly eight-in-ten students who earned a bachelor’s degree from a four-year private institution did so in four years, graduating with manageable debt and prepared to succeed and contribute to the workforce and society.”

Tuition Cuts, Freezes, and Other Affordability Measures Spread

Since the economic downturn, private colleges have introduced creative affordability measures to keep out-of-pocket costs as low as possible for students and families. In recent years, an unprecedented number of private institutions have cut tuition, frozen tuition, announced fixed-tuition guarantees (no increases for students while they are enrolled), or introduced three-year degree programs.

Other initiatives are also spreading, including military scholarships, substantial student aid increases, loan repayment assistance programs, and articulation agreements with community colleges.

More than half (510) of NAICU’s 962 member colleges and universities responded to this year’s survey of published tuition and institutional student aid increases. NAICU member institutions enroll 90 percent of the students who attend private, nonprofit colleges and universities in the United States.  NAICU’s survey collects percentage increases in published tuition and institutional student aid budget increases, but not dollar amounts.

###

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

 

Tuition Survey Chart 2013-14

 

October 10, 2013

show article

read full article


Displaying results 21-25 (of 174)
 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10 

About the items posted on the NAICU site: News items, features, and opinion pieces posted on this site from sources outside NAICU do not necessarily reflect the position of the association or its members. Rather, this content reflects the diversity of issues and views that are shaping American higher education.

Top