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NAICU President David Warren Comments on the 2012 NACUBO Tuition Discounting Survey

NAICU President David Warren Comments on the 2012 NACUBO Tuition Di...

May 06, 2013

WASHINGTON – The National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) today released the 2012 edition of the NACUBO Tuition Discounting Survey.  David Warren, president of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, issued the following statement on the report:

 “America's private, non-profit colleges and universities are committed to enrolling a diverse cohort of students, regardless of financial need, to meet the human resource needs of the nation.  The 2012 NACUBO Tuition Discounting Survey illustrates this commitment by noting that nearly half of private colleges forego tuition revenue or discount tuition to assist families in a weak economy.   This is just one of many efforts by private colleges including containing tuition increases, increasing student aid budgets, and increasing productivity and operating efficiency.  In fact, private colleges had the lowest rate of tuition increases in 2012 (3.9 percent) since 1976, and have increased student aid approximately 7 percent per year over the past four years.

“While the financial outlook for private, nonprofit colleges and universities is challenging, enrollment in the sector has grown by 25 percent over the past decade. These are mission driven institutions with a history of resiliency, innovation, and adaptation.  Moving forward, there will continue to be a demand for diverse marketplace of institutions that serves  any different niches.” 

David Warren
President, NAICU 

About NAICU
NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll nine out of every 10 students attending private, nonprofit institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

-end-

 

WASHINGTON – The National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) today released the 2012 edition of the NACUBO Tuition Discounting Survey.  David Warren, president of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, issued the following statement on the report:

 “America's private, non-profit colleges and universities are committed to enrolling a diverse cohort of students, regardless of financial need, to meet the human resource needs of the nation.  The 2012 NACUBO Tuition Discounting Survey illustrates this commitment by noting that nearly half of private colleges forego tuition revenue or discount tuition to assist families in a weak economy.   This is just one of many efforts by private colleges including containing tuition increases, increasing student aid budgets, and increasing productivity and operating efficiency.  In fact, private colleges had the lowest rate of tuition increases in 2012 (3.9 percent) since 1976, and have increased student aid approximately 7 percent per year over the past four years.

“While the financial outlook for private, nonprofit colleges and universities is challenging, enrollment in the sector has grown by 25 percent over the past decade. These are mission driven institutions with a history of resiliency, innovation, and adaptation.  Moving forward, there will continue to be a demand for diverse marketplace of institutions that serves  any different niches.” 

David Warren
President, NAICU 

About NAICU
NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll nine out of every 10 students attending private, nonprofit institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

-end-

 

May 06, 2013

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NAICU Welcomes New Officers, Members to Board of Directors

NAICU Welcomes New Officers, Members to Board of Directors

February 25, 2013

WASHINGTON, D.C., — The members of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) have selected four new board officers and 15 new board directors.  They assumed their new responsibilities on Feb. 6 at the NAICU 2013 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

Members of NAICU's board of directors set the association's agenda on federal higher education policy; actively encourage support of NAICU priorities and initiatives; and oversee the association's financial administration.  Members serve three-year terms.  Officers hold their positions for one year.

“NAICU's new board members and officers were selected by their peers because of their expertise in the field, proven leadership, and commitment to America's college students,” said NAICU President David L. Warren. “They assume their responsibilities at a time of great challenge and transformation for American higher education.”

New NAICU Board Officers 

Dr. Eileen B. Wilson-Oyelaran, president of Kalamazoo College in Kalamazoo, Mich., has been elected chair of the NAICU board of directors for 2013-14.  Wilson-Oyelaran has served as president of Kalamazoo College since 2005.  She earned her B.A. in sociology from Pomona College, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in education from the Claremont Graduate University.  Vice chair of the NAICU board in 2012-13, Wilson-Oyelaran succeeds Dr. Nathan O. Hatch, president of Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, N.C., who remains on the board as immediate past chair

Dr. Tracy Fitzsimmons, president of Shenandoah University in Winchester, Va., will serve as vice chair of the NAICU board of directors.  She will assume the position of chair next year.

Dr. Kevin J. Manning, president of Stevenson University in Stevenson, Md., has been named treasurer.

Dr. Lee G. Royce, president of Mississippi College in Clinton, Miss., has been named secretary.

New NAICU Board Members    

Eight new members were elected to three-year terms on the NAICU board, representing the association's national regions:

Dr. Susan W. Engelkemeyer, President, Nichols College, Dudley, Mass..
Region I (Conn., Maine, Mass., N.H., R.I., Vt.)

Dr. Charles L. Flynn, Jr., President, College of Mount Saint Vincent, Riverdale, N.Y.
Region II (Del., D.C., Md., N.J., N.Y.)

Dr. Thomas V. Chema, President, Hiram College, Hiram, Ohio
Region III (Ky., Ohio, Pa., W.Va.)

Dr. Jennifer L. Braaten, President, Ferrum College, Ferrum, Va..
Region IV (Fla., Ga., N.C., S.C., Va.)

Dr. Jeffrey R. Docking, President, Adrian College, Adrian, Mich.
Region V (Ill., Ind., Mich., Wis.)

Judge Ken Starr, President, Baylor University, Waco, Texas
Region VI (Ala., Ark., La., Miss., Okla., Tenn., Texas)

Mr. Kent Henning, President, Grand View University, Des Moines, Iowa.
Region VII (Iowa, Kan., Minn., Mo., Neb., N.D., S.D.)

Dr. Ronald R. Thomas, President, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, Wash..
Region VIII (Alaska, Ariz., Calif., Colo., Hawaii, Idaho, Mont., N.M., Nev., Ore., Utah, Wash., Wyo.)

Four presidents have been named to three-year terms as at-large members of the board:

Ms. Lori Bettison-Varga, President, Scripps College, Claremont, Calif.
Dr. Antoine M. Garibaldi, President, University of Detroit Mercy, Detroit, Mich.
Dr. Marjorie Hass, President, Austin College, Sherman, Texas
Dr. David Maxwell, President, Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa

A voting member of the National Association of Independent College and University State Executives will serve a three-year term:

Mr. Paul Hankins, President, Alabama Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, Montgomery, Ala.

A voting member of the NAICU Secretariat will service a three-year term:

Dr. Paul Chewning, President, Appalachian College Association, Berea, Ky.

An ad-hoc, non-voting government relations person will also serve a three-year term:

Ms. Marisa Quinn, Vice President, Public Affairs & University Relations, Brown University, Providence, R.I.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll nine out of every 10 students attending private, nonprofit institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

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WASHINGTON, D.C., — The members of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) have selected four new board officers and 15 new board directors.  They assumed their new responsibilities on Feb. 6 at the NAICU 2013 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

Members of NAICU's board of directors set the association's agenda on federal higher education policy; actively encourage support of NAICU priorities and initiatives; and oversee the association's financial administration.  Members serve three-year terms.  Officers hold their positions for one year.

“NAICU's new board members and officers were selected by their peers because of their expertise in the field, proven leadership, and commitment to America's college students,” said NAICU President David L. Warren. “They assume their responsibilities at a time of great challenge and transformation for American higher education.”

New NAICU Board Officers 

Dr. Eileen B. Wilson-Oyelaran, president of Kalamazoo College in Kalamazoo, Mich., has been elected chair of the NAICU board of directors for 2013-14.  Wilson-Oyelaran has served as president of Kalamazoo College since 2005.  She earned her B.A. in sociology from Pomona College, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in education from the Claremont Graduate University.  Vice chair of the NAICU board in 2012-13, Wilson-Oyelaran succeeds Dr. Nathan O. Hatch, president of Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, N.C., who remains on the board as immediate past chair

Dr. Tracy Fitzsimmons, president of Shenandoah University in Winchester, Va., will serve as vice chair of the NAICU board of directors.  She will assume the position of chair next year.

Dr. Kevin J. Manning, president of Stevenson University in Stevenson, Md., has been named treasurer.

Dr. Lee G. Royce, president of Mississippi College in Clinton, Miss., has been named secretary.

New NAICU Board Members    

Eight new members were elected to three-year terms on the NAICU board, representing the association's national regions:

Dr. Susan W. Engelkemeyer, President, Nichols College, Dudley, Mass..
Region I (Conn., Maine, Mass., N.H., R.I., Vt.)

Dr. Charles L. Flynn, Jr., President, College of Mount Saint Vincent, Riverdale, N.Y.
Region II (Del., D.C., Md., N.J., N.Y.)

Dr. Thomas V. Chema, President, Hiram College, Hiram, Ohio
Region III (Ky., Ohio, Pa., W.Va.)

Dr. Jennifer L. Braaten, President, Ferrum College, Ferrum, Va..
Region IV (Fla., Ga., N.C., S.C., Va.)

Dr. Jeffrey R. Docking, President, Adrian College, Adrian, Mich.
Region V (Ill., Ind., Mich., Wis.)

Judge Ken Starr, President, Baylor University, Waco, Texas
Region VI (Ala., Ark., La., Miss., Okla., Tenn., Texas)

Mr. Kent Henning, President, Grand View University, Des Moines, Iowa.
Region VII (Iowa, Kan., Minn., Mo., Neb., N.D., S.D.)

Dr. Ronald R. Thomas, President, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, Wash..
Region VIII (Alaska, Ariz., Calif., Colo., Hawaii, Idaho, Mont., N.M., Nev., Ore., Utah, Wash., Wyo.)

Four presidents have been named to three-year terms as at-large members of the board:

Ms. Lori Bettison-Varga, President, Scripps College, Claremont, Calif.
Dr. Antoine M. Garibaldi, President, University of Detroit Mercy, Detroit, Mich.
Dr. Marjorie Hass, President, Austin College, Sherman, Texas
Dr. David Maxwell, President, Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa

A voting member of the National Association of Independent College and University State Executives will serve a three-year term:

Mr. Paul Hankins, President, Alabama Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, Montgomery, Ala.

A voting member of the NAICU Secretariat will service a three-year term:

Dr. Paul Chewning, President, Appalachian College Association, Berea, Ky.

An ad-hoc, non-voting government relations person will also serve a three-year term:

Ms. Marisa Quinn, Vice President, Public Affairs & University Relations, Brown University, Providence, R.I.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll nine out of every 10 students attending private, nonprofit institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

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February 25, 2013

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Kalamazoo College President Eileen B. Wilson-Oyelaran Named Chair of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities

Kalamazoo College President Eileen B. Wilson-Oyelaran Named Chair o...

February 14, 2013

WASHINGTON, D.C., February 14—Dr. Eileen B. Wilson-Oyelaran, president of Kalamazoo College, has been named chair of the board of directors of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) for 2013-14. She assumed her position on Feb. 6, at the NAICU 2013 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. 

As chair, Dr. Wilson-Oyelaran will lead the NAICU board in setting the association’s agenda on federal higher education policy, actively encourage support of NAICU priorities and initiatives, and oversee the association’s financial administration. She was elected to a three-year term to the NAICU board in 2011, and will serve as its chair for one year. Once her term as chair expires in early February 2014, she will remain on the board for a fourth year in the role of past-chair. Eilee Wilson-Oyelaran.v2.png

“President Wilson-Oyelaran assumes the NAICU chair at an unprecedented time of change and challenge for American higher education,” said NAICU President David L. Warren. “The deepening role of the federal government, tightening fiscal constraints, rapidly changing student demographics, a wave of technological innovation, and globalization are converging in ways the nation has never experienced.”

“Because of her experience, wisdom, and leadership on issues of higher education affordability, access, and quality, President Wilson-Oyelaran’s peers have selected her to serve as board chair during this important time for the nation’s private nonprofit colleges and universities,” Warren said.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of private nonprofit higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of independent higher education in the United States. Since 1976, the association has represented private nonprofit colleges and universities on policy issues with the federal government, such as those affecting student aid, taxation, and government regulation.

NAICU members enroll nine out of every 10 students attending private nonprofit institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

NAICU spearheads several major public initiatives, including the Student Aid Alliance, a national coalition that advocates for enhanced funding of the federal student aid programs; the University and College Accountability Network (U-CAN) consumer information website; and the nonpartisan National Campus Voter Registration Project, which engages college students in the electoral process.

Wilson-Oyelaran has served as president of Kalamazoo College since 2005. She earned her B.A. in sociology from Pomona College, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in education from the Claremont Graduate University.

WASHINGTON, D.C., February 14—Dr. Eileen B. Wilson-Oyelaran, president of Kalamazoo College, has been named chair of the board of directors of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) for 2013-14. She assumed her position on Feb. 6, at the NAICU 2013 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. 

As chair, Dr. Wilson-Oyelaran will lead the NAICU board in setting the association’s agenda on federal higher education policy, actively encourage support of NAICU priorities and initiatives, and oversee the association’s financial administration. She was elected to a three-year term to the NAICU board in 2011, and will serve as its chair for one year. Once her term as chair expires in early February 2014, she will remain on the board for a fourth year in the role of past-chair. Eilee Wilson-Oyelaran.v2.png

“President Wilson-Oyelaran assumes the NAICU chair at an unprecedented time of change and challenge for American higher education,” said NAICU President David L. Warren. “The deepening role of the federal government, tightening fiscal constraints, rapidly changing student demographics, a wave of technological innovation, and globalization are converging in ways the nation has never experienced.”

“Because of her experience, wisdom, and leadership on issues of higher education affordability, access, and quality, President Wilson-Oyelaran’s peers have selected her to serve as board chair during this important time for the nation’s private nonprofit colleges and universities,” Warren said.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of private nonprofit higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of independent higher education in the United States. Since 1976, the association has represented private nonprofit colleges and universities on policy issues with the federal government, such as those affecting student aid, taxation, and government regulation.

NAICU members enroll nine out of every 10 students attending private nonprofit institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

NAICU spearheads several major public initiatives, including the Student Aid Alliance, a national coalition that advocates for enhanced funding of the federal student aid programs; the University and College Accountability Network (U-CAN) consumer information website; and the nonpartisan National Campus Voter Registration Project, which engages college students in the electoral process.

Wilson-Oyelaran has served as president of Kalamazoo College since 2005. She earned her B.A. in sociology from Pomona College, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in education from the Claremont Graduate University.

February 14, 2013

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Bernard Fryshman, Executive Vice President of the Association of Advanced Rabbinical and Talmudic Schools, to Receive 2013 Paley Award for Service to Independent Higher Education

Bernard Fryshman, Executive Vice President of the Association of Ad...

February 01, 2013

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 1 — Dr. Bernard Fryshman, executive vice president of the Association of Advanced Rabbinical and Talmudic Schools (AARTS) has been selected to receive the 2013 Henry Paley Memorial Award from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). The award will be presented on Feb. 5 by NAICU President David L. Warren during the NAICU annual meeting in Washington, D.C. The awards reception, which begins at 6:30 p.m., will be held in the Regency B Ballroom at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education. The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States. The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984.

Since 1973, Fryshman has not only led AARTS, making what happens within its member schools accessible to the outside world, but devoted countless hours in extraordinary service to the broader world of higher education nationally.

For 40 years, he has been a driving force in higher education accreditation. Fryshman served two terms on the predecessor to the National Advisory Committee on Institutional Quality and Integrity, the body that advises the U.S. Department of Education on issues related to higher education accreditation and institutional eligibility for federal student aid programs. He also has served on committees of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation and the Association of Specialized and Professional Accreditors.

A prolific writer, especially on issues relating to accreditation, Fryshman’s opinion pieces have often appeared in Inside Higher Ed and other publications, and have been an important force in shaping the national higher education policy conversation.

Within NAICU, Fryshman’s service has been long-term and influential, including testifying on behalf of the association before congressional committees, and service on NAICU board committees.

“The passion and commitment Bernie Fryshman has brought to his work has always been about the greater good,” said NAICU President David L. Warren. “It is a passion founded on a belief in human dignity, the importance of the mind, and the welfare of students.”

“For his remarkable accomplishments and steadfast commitment as a master craftsman in both the art and the mechanics of higher education, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is honored to present its 2013 Henry Paley Memorial Award to Bernie Fryshman,” Warren said.

Born in Montreal, Fryshman came to the United States, and to New York City, to earn his Ph.D. in physics at New York University. In all the decades that followed, he never left the field of physics. The spring 2013 semester will mark 50 uninterrupted years of his teaching the subject – presently at the New York Institute of Technology.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 1 — Dr. Bernard Fryshman, executive vice president of the Association of Advanced Rabbinical and Talmudic Schools (AARTS) has been selected to receive the 2013 Henry Paley Memorial Award from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). The award will be presented on Feb. 5 by NAICU President David L. Warren during the NAICU annual meeting in Washington, D.C. The awards reception, which begins at 6:30 p.m., will be held in the Regency B Ballroom at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education. The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States. The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984.

Since 1973, Fryshman has not only led AARTS, making what happens within its member schools accessible to the outside world, but devoted countless hours in extraordinary service to the broader world of higher education nationally.

For 40 years, he has been a driving force in higher education accreditation. Fryshman served two terms on the predecessor to the National Advisory Committee on Institutional Quality and Integrity, the body that advises the U.S. Department of Education on issues related to higher education accreditation and institutional eligibility for federal student aid programs. He also has served on committees of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation and the Association of Specialized and Professional Accreditors.

A prolific writer, especially on issues relating to accreditation, Fryshman’s opinion pieces have often appeared in Inside Higher Ed and other publications, and have been an important force in shaping the national higher education policy conversation.

Within NAICU, Fryshman’s service has been long-term and influential, including testifying on behalf of the association before congressional committees, and service on NAICU board committees.

“The passion and commitment Bernie Fryshman has brought to his work has always been about the greater good,” said NAICU President David L. Warren. “It is a passion founded on a belief in human dignity, the importance of the mind, and the welfare of students.”

“For his remarkable accomplishments and steadfast commitment as a master craftsman in both the art and the mechanics of higher education, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is honored to present its 2013 Henry Paley Memorial Award to Bernie Fryshman,” Warren said.

Born in Montreal, Fryshman came to the United States, and to New York City, to earn his Ph.D. in physics at New York University. In all the decades that followed, he never left the field of physics. The spring 2013 semester will mark 50 uninterrupted years of his teaching the subject – presently at the New York Institute of Technology.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

February 01, 2013

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Arnold L. Mitchem, President of the Council for Opportunity in Education, to Receive 2013 NAICU Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education

Arnold L. Mitchem, President of the Council for Opportunity in Educ...

February 01, 2013

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 1 — Dr. Arnold L. Mitchem, president of the Council for Opportunity in Education, has been selected to receive the 2013 Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU).  The award will be presented on Feb. 5 by NAICU President David L. Warren during the NAICU annual meeting in Washington, D.C.  The awards reception, which begins at 6:30 p.m., will be held in the Regency B Ballroom at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

The NAICU Advocacy Award was established in 1993 to recognize individuals outside of academe who have championed the cause of independent nonprofit higher education.  No single contribution makes one eligible to receive the award.  Instead, it recognizes a lifetime of service, initiative, and determination.

As the founding president of the Council for Opportunity in Education, the core advocacy and professional group for the federal TRIO programs, Mitchem has long stood as a model in Washington higher education circles for how to most effectively speak on behalf of low-income, first-generation, and disabled students.

By empowering TRIO students to be proud of the adversity they have overcome to attend and succeed in college, he provides elected officials with living examples of how their work is changing lives.  At the same time, for students who often have felt left out or left behind, his pride and faith in them enhances their sense of self-worth, as they present their case to those at the highest levels of government.

In 1994, when the Contract with America began to take shape, it became evident that federal student aid programs were at risk of being gutted.  Mitchem was the first to partner with NAICU in forming the Student Aid Alliance – a major initiative by the higher education community to ensure that student aid funding remained strong.  As a result of that joint effort, those programs were not cut but rather saw an increase in funding.  And the Alliance was a key force in establishing the strong bi-partisan support that federal student aid programs continue to enjoy today.

Mitchem began his career as a member of the history faculty at Marquette University, where he also earned a Ph.D. in foundations of education and served as director of Marquette’s TRIO programs.  Even long after leaving Marquette for Washington, D.C., to head the Council for Opportunity in Education, Mitchem has continued to speak passionately about the remarkable success first-generation-to-college students (a term he coined in congressional testimony) have at independent colleges and universities.

“For his passionate leadership and advocacy in making college possible for students who otherwise might never attend and succeed, and for his unwavering belief in a system of higher education that serves all of its citizens, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is honored to present the 20th annual NAICU Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education to Arnold Mitchem,” said NAICU President David L. Warren.

In addition to his doctorate, Mitchem holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Southern Colorado and 10 honorary degrees – including four from NAICU members: DePaul University, Marquette University, Lewis University, and Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia.

Mitchem is a longtime member of Marquette’s board of trustees, has done graduate work in European history as a Woodrow Wilson Fellow at the University of Wisconsin, and is a past president of the Committee for Education Funding.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education.  With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions.  They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions. 

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 1 — Dr. Arnold L. Mitchem, president of the Council for Opportunity in Education, has been selected to receive the 2013 Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU).  The award will be presented on Feb. 5 by NAICU President David L. Warren during the NAICU annual meeting in Washington, D.C.  The awards reception, which begins at 6:30 p.m., will be held in the Regency B Ballroom at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

The NAICU Advocacy Award was established in 1993 to recognize individuals outside of academe who have championed the cause of independent nonprofit higher education.  No single contribution makes one eligible to receive the award.  Instead, it recognizes a lifetime of service, initiative, and determination.

As the founding president of the Council for Opportunity in Education, the core advocacy and professional group for the federal TRIO programs, Mitchem has long stood as a model in Washington higher education circles for how to most effectively speak on behalf of low-income, first-generation, and disabled students.

By empowering TRIO students to be proud of the adversity they have overcome to attend and succeed in college, he provides elected officials with living examples of how their work is changing lives.  At the same time, for students who often have felt left out or left behind, his pride and faith in them enhances their sense of self-worth, as they present their case to those at the highest levels of government.

In 1994, when the Contract with America began to take shape, it became evident that federal student aid programs were at risk of being gutted.  Mitchem was the first to partner with NAICU in forming the Student Aid Alliance – a major initiative by the higher education community to ensure that student aid funding remained strong.  As a result of that joint effort, those programs were not cut but rather saw an increase in funding.  And the Alliance was a key force in establishing the strong bi-partisan support that federal student aid programs continue to enjoy today.

Mitchem began his career as a member of the history faculty at Marquette University, where he also earned a Ph.D. in foundations of education and served as director of Marquette’s TRIO programs.  Even long after leaving Marquette for Washington, D.C., to head the Council for Opportunity in Education, Mitchem has continued to speak passionately about the remarkable success first-generation-to-college students (a term he coined in congressional testimony) have at independent colleges and universities.

“For his passionate leadership and advocacy in making college possible for students who otherwise might never attend and succeed, and for his unwavering belief in a system of higher education that serves all of its citizens, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is honored to present the 20th annual NAICU Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education to Arnold Mitchem,” said NAICU President David L. Warren.

In addition to his doctorate, Mitchem holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Southern Colorado and 10 honorary degrees – including four from NAICU members: DePaul University, Marquette University, Lewis University, and Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia.

Mitchem is a longtime member of Marquette’s board of trustees, has done graduate work in European history as a Woodrow Wilson Fellow at the University of Wisconsin, and is a past president of the Committee for Education Funding.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education.  With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions.  They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions. 

February 01, 2013

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About the items posted on the NAICU site: News items, features, and opinion pieces posted on this site from sources outside NAICU do not necessarily reflect the position of the association or its members. Rather, this content reflects the diversity of issues and views that are shaping American higher education.

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