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Private College Tuition Increases Slow to Lowest Rate in at Least Four Decades

Private College Tuition Increases Slow to Lowest Rate in at Least F...

October 04, 2012

Published Tuition at Private Institutions Grows an Average of 3.9 Percent for 2012-13;
Institutional Student Aid Up 6.2 Percent


Related: New Affordability Measures at Private, Nonprofit Colleges and Universities: Academic Years 2013-14 and 2012-13


WASHINGTON, D.C., Oct. 4—Published tuition and fees at the nation’s private, nonprofit colleges and universities rose 3.9 percent for the 2012-13 academic year, the lowest rate in at least four decades, according to a survey by the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). At the same time, institutional student aid budgets at private colleges increased an average of 6.2 percent for 2012-13.

Of NAICU’s 960 member colleges and universities, 445 responded to this year’s survey of published tuition and institutional student aid increases. NAICU member institutions enroll 90 percent of the students who attend private, nonprofit colleges and universities in the United States.

This is the fourth consecutive year that the percentage increase in published tuition has stayed below pre-recession rates, and the first time in at least four decades it has been below 4 percent.  From 2009-10 to 2011-12, average private college tuition increases ran in the mid-4 percent range, down from an average annual increase of 5.7 percent during the previous 10 years.  This year’s 3.9 percent increase is the lowest NAICU has on record. (NAICU’s data goes back to 1972-73.)

This year’s average 6.2 percent increase in institutional student aid follows increases of 7 percent, 6.8 percent, and 9 percent in 2011-12, 2010-11, and 2009-10, respectively. The NAICU survey did not collect student aid figures prior to 2009-10.  

“Students and families are increasingly price- and value-conscious,” said NAICU President David L. Warren. “Private college leaders are listening, and working hard to keep students’ out-of-pockets costs as low as possible and provide the best value for the tuition dollar.”

“Since the economic downturn, private colleges and universities across the nation have redoubled efforts to cut their operating costs, improve their efficiency, and enhance their affordability,” Warren said. “More will continue to be done by private institutions to stay affordable and within reach of families from all backgrounds.”

According to the College Board, average inflation-adjusted net tuition and fees (published tuition and fees minus grant aid from all sources and federal higher education tax benefits) at private colleges dropped 4.1 percent from 2006-07 to 2011-12.

“Students and families should not rule out a private college just because of its sticker price,” said Warren.

Tuition Cuts, Freezes, and Other Affordability Measures Spread

Since the economic downturn, private colleges have introduced creative affordability measures to keep students' and families' out-of-pocket costs as low as possible. In recent years, an unprecedented number of private institutions have cut tuition, frozen tuition, announced fixed-tuition guarantees (no increases for students while they are enrolled), or introduced three-year degree programs.

Other initiatives are also spreading, including four-year graduation guarantees, substantial student aid increases, published tuition increases that are the lowest in years or decades, and degree partnerships with community colleges.

[Campus affordability measures introduced in the 2012-13 academic year, and initiatives started in previous years, are posted on the NAICU website at www.naicu.edu/affordability. NAICU has also begun to post 2013-14 initiatives, as they are announced.]

“The intense focus by private colleges on affordability and institutional cost control is here for the long run,” Warren said. “Broad economic, demographic, and market trends have made it a necessity for every institution of higher education.”

“Each college and university will determine for itself – based on institution-specific financial, market, and mission-related factors – the approach that best addresses growing consumer concern over rising college prices, while best serving the educational needs of its students,” said Warren.

Average Published Tuition, Net Tuition, and Student Debt

NAICU’s survey collects percentage increases in published tuition and institutional student aid budget increases, but not dollar amounts.

According to the College Board, in 2011-12, published tuition and fees at private, nonprofit colleges and universities averaged $28,500. However, average net tuition for full-time students dropped to $12,970, after grant aid from all sources and federal tax benefits.

The average debt of bachelor’s degree recipients at private, nonprofit colleges who borrowed was $28,100 in 2010, according to the College Board. This compares to average student loan debt of $22,000 for graduates of four-year public universities.

Tuition Drivers

Growing demand for student financial assistance, along with cost drivers that typically rise faster than inflation – employee health care, insurance premiums, and information technology – all contribute to rising tuition. For example, health-care insurance premiums for college employees increased 6.7 percent this year, according to the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources.

Significant investments in student support services, including mental health counseling, support for students with disabilities, and programs designed to boost student retention and graduation rates for at-risk populations, have also stretched institutional budgets.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

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Published Tuition at Private Institutions Grows an Average of 3.9 Percent for 2012-13;
Institutional Student Aid Up 6.2 Percent


Related: New Affordability Measures at Private, Nonprofit Colleges and Universities: Academic Years 2013-14 and 2012-13


WASHINGTON, D.C., Oct. 4—Published tuition and fees at the nation’s private, nonprofit colleges and universities rose 3.9 percent for the 2012-13 academic year, the lowest rate in at least four decades, according to a survey by the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). At the same time, institutional student aid budgets at private colleges increased an average of 6.2 percent for 2012-13.

Of NAICU’s 960 member colleges and universities, 445 responded to this year’s survey of published tuition and institutional student aid increases. NAICU member institutions enroll 90 percent of the students who attend private, nonprofit colleges and universities in the United States.

This is the fourth consecutive year that the percentage increase in published tuition has stayed below pre-recession rates, and the first time in at least four decades it has been below 4 percent.  From 2009-10 to 2011-12, average private college tuition increases ran in the mid-4 percent range, down from an average annual increase of 5.7 percent during the previous 10 years.  This year’s 3.9 percent increase is the lowest NAICU has on record. (NAICU’s data goes back to 1972-73.)

This year’s average 6.2 percent increase in institutional student aid follows increases of 7 percent, 6.8 percent, and 9 percent in 2011-12, 2010-11, and 2009-10, respectively. The NAICU survey did not collect student aid figures prior to 2009-10.  

“Students and families are increasingly price- and value-conscious,” said NAICU President David L. Warren. “Private college leaders are listening, and working hard to keep students’ out-of-pockets costs as low as possible and provide the best value for the tuition dollar.”

“Since the economic downturn, private colleges and universities across the nation have redoubled efforts to cut their operating costs, improve their efficiency, and enhance their affordability,” Warren said. “More will continue to be done by private institutions to stay affordable and within reach of families from all backgrounds.”

According to the College Board, average inflation-adjusted net tuition and fees (published tuition and fees minus grant aid from all sources and federal higher education tax benefits) at private colleges dropped 4.1 percent from 2006-07 to 2011-12.

“Students and families should not rule out a private college just because of its sticker price,” said Warren.

Tuition Cuts, Freezes, and Other Affordability Measures Spread

Since the economic downturn, private colleges have introduced creative affordability measures to keep students' and families' out-of-pocket costs as low as possible. In recent years, an unprecedented number of private institutions have cut tuition, frozen tuition, announced fixed-tuition guarantees (no increases for students while they are enrolled), or introduced three-year degree programs.

Other initiatives are also spreading, including four-year graduation guarantees, substantial student aid increases, published tuition increases that are the lowest in years or decades, and degree partnerships with community colleges.

[Campus affordability measures introduced in the 2012-13 academic year, and initiatives started in previous years, are posted on the NAICU website at www.naicu.edu/affordability. NAICU has also begun to post 2013-14 initiatives, as they are announced.]

“The intense focus by private colleges on affordability and institutional cost control is here for the long run,” Warren said. “Broad economic, demographic, and market trends have made it a necessity for every institution of higher education.”

“Each college and university will determine for itself – based on institution-specific financial, market, and mission-related factors – the approach that best addresses growing consumer concern over rising college prices, while best serving the educational needs of its students,” said Warren.

Average Published Tuition, Net Tuition, and Student Debt

NAICU’s survey collects percentage increases in published tuition and institutional student aid budget increases, but not dollar amounts.

According to the College Board, in 2011-12, published tuition and fees at private, nonprofit colleges and universities averaged $28,500. However, average net tuition for full-time students dropped to $12,970, after grant aid from all sources and federal tax benefits.

The average debt of bachelor’s degree recipients at private, nonprofit colleges who borrowed was $28,100 in 2010, according to the College Board. This compares to average student loan debt of $22,000 for graduates of four-year public universities.

Tuition Drivers

Growing demand for student financial assistance, along with cost drivers that typically rise faster than inflation – employee health care, insurance premiums, and information technology – all contribute to rising tuition. For example, health-care insurance premiums for college employees increased 6.7 percent this year, according to the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources.

Significant investments in student support services, including mental health counseling, support for students with disabilities, and programs designed to boost student retention and graduation rates for at-risk populations, have also stretched institutional budgets.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

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October 04, 2012

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NAICU Joins in Launch of New Higher Education Compliance Alliance

NAICU Joins in Launch of New Higher Education Compliance Alliance

March 01, 2012

WASHINGTON, D.C., March 1 - The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) has joined nearly two dozen other national higher education organizations to launch the Higher Education Compliance Alliance (www.higheredcompliance.org).

The alliance, which is coordinated by the National Association of College and University Attorneys, is a new online resource to assist institutions in finding their way through the terrain of ever-growing federal laws and regulations.

The alliance website, unveiled today, will serve as a "one-stop shop" for the compliance resources developed by higher education associations representing a wide breadth of campus activities. In addition to providing compliance information by topic, the site offers advice about designing compliance and risk management programs and features sample compliance websites.

NAICU President David L. Warren noted, "NAICU is pleased to join forces in this higher education community effort to ease the way for institutions that are attempting to meet their multiple compliance responsibilities. Compliance is a massive and ever-growing challenge for all institutions. It is particularly daunting to the many small colleges where lean administrative budgets mean that every employee wears two or three hats, at a minimum. This collective effort will offer some measure of relief, and we are happy to be a part of it."

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

###

Media Contact:

Tony Pals
tony@naicu.edu
direct office: (202) 739-0474
cell: (202) 288-9333

 


WASHINGTON, D.C., March 1 - The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) has joined nearly two dozen other national higher education organizations to launch the Higher Education Compliance Alliance (www.higheredcompliance.org).

The alliance, which is coordinated by the National Association of College and University Attorneys, is a new online resource to assist institutions in finding their way through the terrain of ever-growing federal laws and regulations.

The alliance website, unveiled today, will serve as a "one-stop shop" for the compliance resources developed by higher education associations representing a wide breadth of campus activities. In addition to providing compliance information by topic, the site offers advice about designing compliance and risk management programs and features sample compliance websites.

NAICU President David L. Warren noted, "NAICU is pleased to join forces in this higher education community effort to ease the way for institutions that are attempting to meet their multiple compliance responsibilities. Compliance is a massive and ever-growing challenge for all institutions. It is particularly daunting to the many small colleges where lean administrative budgets mean that every employee wears two or three hats, at a minimum. This collective effort will offer some measure of relief, and we are happy to be a part of it."

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

###

Media Contact:

Tony Pals
tony@naicu.edu
direct office: (202) 739-0474
cell: (202) 288-9333

 


March 01, 2012

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NAICU Membership Elects 2012-13 Board of Directors

NAICU Membership Elects 2012-13 Board of Directors

February 10, 2012

WASHINGTON, D.C., February 10-The members of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) have selected 14 new board directors and four new board officers for 2012-13. They were officially appointed on Feb. 1 at the NAICU 2012 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

Members of NAICU's board of directors set the association's agenda on federal higher education policy; actively encourage support of NAICU priorities and initiatives; and oversee the association's financial administration. Members serve three-year terms. Officers hold their positions for one year.

"NAICU's new board members and officers were selected by their peers because of their expertise in the field, proven leadership, and commitment to America's college students," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "They assume their responsibilities at a time of great challenge and transformation for American higher education."

New NAICU Board Officers

Dr. Nathan O. Hatch, president of Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, N.C., has been elected chair of the NAICU board of directors for 2012-13. Hatch, who has served in his role at Wake Forest since 2005, is an active leader in American higher education and in local and community affairs. He recently served on the board of the American Council on Education, and he is currently a member of the Division I Board of Directors of the NCAA. Vice chair of the NAICU board in 2011-12, Hatch succeeds Dr. Daniel J. Carey, president of Edgewood College in Madison, Wis., who remains on the board as immediate past chair.

Dr. Eileen B. Wilson-Oyelaran, president of Kalamazoo College in Kalamazoo, Mich., will serve as vice chair of the NAICU board of directors. She will assume the position of chair next year.

Dr. Elizabeth Kiss, president of Agnes Scott College in Decatur, Ga., has been named treasurer.

Dr. Dale T. Knobel, president of Denison University in Granville, Ohio, has been named secretary.

New NAICU Board Members

Eight new members were elected to three-year terms on the NAICU board, representing the association's national regions:

Dr. Pamela Trotman Reid, President, Saint Joseph College, West Hartford, Conn.
Region I (Conn., Maine, Mass., N.H., R.I., Vt.)

Dr. Barbara-Jayne Lewthwaite, President, Centenary College, Hackettstown, N.J.
Region II (Del., D.C., Md., N.J., N.Y.)

Mr. William D. Huston, President, Saint Catharine College, St. Catharine, Ky.
Region III (Ky., Ohio, Pa., W.Va.)

Dr. Cleveland L. Sellers, Jr., President, Voorhees College, Denmark, S.C.
Region IV (Fla., Ga., N.C., S.C., Va.)

Dr. David L. Parkyn, President, North Park University, Chicago, Ill.
Region V (Ill., Ind., Mich., Wis.)

Dr. Forrest E. Harris, President, American Baptist College, Nashville, Tenn.
Region VI (Ala., Ark., La., Miss., Okla., Tenn., Texas)

Dr. David L. Sallee, President, William Jewell College, Liberty, Mo.
Region VII (Iowa, Kan., Minn., Mo., Neb., N.D., S.D.)

Dr. Gayle D. Beebe, President, Westmont College, Santa Barbara, Calif.
Region VIII (Alaska, Ariz., Calif., Colo., Hawaii, Idaho, Mont., N.M., Nev., Ore., Utah, Wash., Wyo.)

Four presidents have been named to three-year terms as at-large members of the board:

Dr. Pamela R. Fox, President, Mary Baldwin College, Staunton, Va.

Rev. Dennis H. Holtschneider, President, DePaul University, Chicago, Ill.

Mr. Marvin Krislov, President, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio

Dr. John M. McCardell, Jr., Vice-Chancellor, Sewanee: The University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn.

A voting member of the National Association of Independent College and University State Executives will serve a three-year term:

Dr. Ed H. Moore, President, Independent Colleges and Universities of Florida, Tallahassee, Fla.

An ad-hoc, non-voting government relations person will also serve a three-year term:

Ms. Jennifer Grodsky, Executive Director of Federal Relations, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll nine out of every 10 students attending private, nonprofit institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

###

 

 

Media Contact:

Tony Pals
tony@naicu.edu
direct office: (202) 739-0474
cell: (202) 288-9333

WASHINGTON, D.C., February 10-The members of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) have selected 14 new board directors and four new board officers for 2012-13. They were officially appointed on Feb. 1 at the NAICU 2012 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

Members of NAICU's board of directors set the association's agenda on federal higher education policy; actively encourage support of NAICU priorities and initiatives; and oversee the association's financial administration. Members serve three-year terms. Officers hold their positions for one year.

"NAICU's new board members and officers were selected by their peers because of their expertise in the field, proven leadership, and commitment to America's college students," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "They assume their responsibilities at a time of great challenge and transformation for American higher education."

New NAICU Board Officers

Dr. Nathan O. Hatch, president of Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, N.C., has been elected chair of the NAICU board of directors for 2012-13. Hatch, who has served in his role at Wake Forest since 2005, is an active leader in American higher education and in local and community affairs. He recently served on the board of the American Council on Education, and he is currently a member of the Division I Board of Directors of the NCAA. Vice chair of the NAICU board in 2011-12, Hatch succeeds Dr. Daniel J. Carey, president of Edgewood College in Madison, Wis., who remains on the board as immediate past chair.

Dr. Eileen B. Wilson-Oyelaran, president of Kalamazoo College in Kalamazoo, Mich., will serve as vice chair of the NAICU board of directors. She will assume the position of chair next year.

Dr. Elizabeth Kiss, president of Agnes Scott College in Decatur, Ga., has been named treasurer.

Dr. Dale T. Knobel, president of Denison University in Granville, Ohio, has been named secretary.

New NAICU Board Members

Eight new members were elected to three-year terms on the NAICU board, representing the association's national regions:

Dr. Pamela Trotman Reid, President, Saint Joseph College, West Hartford, Conn.
Region I (Conn., Maine, Mass., N.H., R.I., Vt.)

Dr. Barbara-Jayne Lewthwaite, President, Centenary College, Hackettstown, N.J.
Region II (Del., D.C., Md., N.J., N.Y.)

Mr. William D. Huston, President, Saint Catharine College, St. Catharine, Ky.
Region III (Ky., Ohio, Pa., W.Va.)

Dr. Cleveland L. Sellers, Jr., President, Voorhees College, Denmark, S.C.
Region IV (Fla., Ga., N.C., S.C., Va.)

Dr. David L. Parkyn, President, North Park University, Chicago, Ill.
Region V (Ill., Ind., Mich., Wis.)

Dr. Forrest E. Harris, President, American Baptist College, Nashville, Tenn.
Region VI (Ala., Ark., La., Miss., Okla., Tenn., Texas)

Dr. David L. Sallee, President, William Jewell College, Liberty, Mo.
Region VII (Iowa, Kan., Minn., Mo., Neb., N.D., S.D.)

Dr. Gayle D. Beebe, President, Westmont College, Santa Barbara, Calif.
Region VIII (Alaska, Ariz., Calif., Colo., Hawaii, Idaho, Mont., N.M., Nev., Ore., Utah, Wash., Wyo.)

Four presidents have been named to three-year terms as at-large members of the board:

Dr. Pamela R. Fox, President, Mary Baldwin College, Staunton, Va.

Rev. Dennis H. Holtschneider, President, DePaul University, Chicago, Ill.

Mr. Marvin Krislov, President, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio

Dr. John M. McCardell, Jr., Vice-Chancellor, Sewanee: The University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn.

A voting member of the National Association of Independent College and University State Executives will serve a three-year term:

Dr. Ed H. Moore, President, Independent Colleges and Universities of Florida, Tallahassee, Fla.

An ad-hoc, non-voting government relations person will also serve a three-year term:

Ms. Jennifer Grodsky, Executive Director of Federal Relations, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll nine out of every 10 students attending private, nonprofit institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

###

 

 

Media Contact:

Tony Pals
tony@naicu.edu
direct office: (202) 739-0474
cell: (202) 288-9333

February 10, 2012

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United Technologies Corporation Receives 2012 NAICU Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education

United Technologies Corporation Receives 2012 NAICU Award for Advoc...

January 31, 2012

WASHINGTON, D.C., Jan. 31, 2012 - United Technologies Corporation (UTC) received the 2012 Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education today from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). The award was presented by NAICU President David L. Warren and Fairfield University President Rev. Jeffrey P. von Arx during a luncheon at the NAICU 2012 Annual Meeting. The meeting is being held in Washington, D.C., at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

UTC Chairman & CEO Louis Chênevert accepted the award on behalf of the corporation.

The NAICU Advocacy Award was established in 1993 to recognize individuals outside of academe who have championed the cause of independent nonprofit higher education. No single contribution makes one eligible to receive the award. Instead, it recognizes an extended record of service, initiative, and determination.

The presentation of the 2012 NAICU Advocacy Award to United Technologies marks the first time a corporate entity, rather than an individual, has received the award. This special recognition is a reflection of the extraordinary commitment the corporation as a whole has demonstrated through its Employee Scholar Program to the transformative power of higher education.

This year, the 16th anniversary of the program, UTC's Employee Scholar Program will exceed a landmark investment of $1 billion in employer-provided educational assistance since its inception. Over those years, UTC employees in more than 50 countries have earned more than 32,000 associate's, bachelor's, and master's degrees through this program.

"For its vision and its commitment to the education of its employees as exemplified by its Employee Scholar Program, and for its enlightened view of the power of higher education to transform people and the nation, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is pleased to present United Technologies Corporation with the NAICU Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education," said NAICU President David L. Warren.

"The UTC Employee Scholar Program stands as a model, worthy of emulation across corporate America, of investment in education for the betterment of individuals and society," Warren said.

The Employee Scholar Program strives to remove barriers for employees dedicated to learning. United Technologies pays for tuition, books and fees for recipients, upfront and directly to the educational institution. These employee-students also receive up to three hours a week of paid release time for study. The program is open to all employees - domestic and international, professional, and hourly - and, for a defined period of time, to employees who lose their jobs due to work-related circumstances. There is no obligation on the part of degree recipients to stay with the corporation. Employees are free to pursue any field of study that interests them. Currently there are more than 11,000 UTC employees enrolled in college programs.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

 

Media Contact:

Tony Pals
tony@naicu.edu
direct office: (202) 739-0474
cell: (202) 288-9333

WASHINGTON, D.C., Jan. 31, 2012 - United Technologies Corporation (UTC) received the 2012 Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education today from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). The award was presented by NAICU President David L. Warren and Fairfield University President Rev. Jeffrey P. von Arx during a luncheon at the NAICU 2012 Annual Meeting. The meeting is being held in Washington, D.C., at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

UTC Chairman & CEO Louis Chênevert accepted the award on behalf of the corporation.

The NAICU Advocacy Award was established in 1993 to recognize individuals outside of academe who have championed the cause of independent nonprofit higher education. No single contribution makes one eligible to receive the award. Instead, it recognizes an extended record of service, initiative, and determination.

The presentation of the 2012 NAICU Advocacy Award to United Technologies marks the first time a corporate entity, rather than an individual, has received the award. This special recognition is a reflection of the extraordinary commitment the corporation as a whole has demonstrated through its Employee Scholar Program to the transformative power of higher education.

This year, the 16th anniversary of the program, UTC's Employee Scholar Program will exceed a landmark investment of $1 billion in employer-provided educational assistance since its inception. Over those years, UTC employees in more than 50 countries have earned more than 32,000 associate's, bachelor's, and master's degrees through this program.

"For its vision and its commitment to the education of its employees as exemplified by its Employee Scholar Program, and for its enlightened view of the power of higher education to transform people and the nation, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is pleased to present United Technologies Corporation with the NAICU Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education," said NAICU President David L. Warren.

"The UTC Employee Scholar Program stands as a model, worthy of emulation across corporate America, of investment in education for the betterment of individuals and society," Warren said.

The Employee Scholar Program strives to remove barriers for employees dedicated to learning. United Technologies pays for tuition, books and fees for recipients, upfront and directly to the educational institution. These employee-students also receive up to three hours a week of paid release time for study. The program is open to all employees - domestic and international, professional, and hourly - and, for a defined period of time, to employees who lose their jobs due to work-related circumstances. There is no obligation on the part of degree recipients to stay with the corporation. Employees are free to pursue any field of study that interests them. Currently there are more than 11,000 UTC employees enrolled in college programs.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

 

Media Contact:

Tony Pals
tony@naicu.edu
direct office: (202) 739-0474
cell: (202) 288-9333

January 31, 2012

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NAICU News

Trinity Washington University President Patricia McGuire Receives 2012 Paley Award for Service to Independent Higher Education

Trinity Washington University President Patricia McGuire Receives 2...

January 31, 2012

WASHINGTON, D.C., Jan. 31-Patricia McGuire, president of Trinity Washington University received the 2012 Henry Paley Memorial Award today from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). She received the award from NAICU President David L. Warren and Herbert Tillery, executive director of the College Success Foundation - District of Columbia, at the NAICU 2012 Annual Meeting. The meeting is being held in Washington, D.C., at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education. The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States. The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984.

"Pat McGuire is an icon of higher education leadership," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "She has transformed her institution into a national model of private, nonprofit higher education serving a public purpose, and is a tireless, passionate, and articulate voice for the value of America's colleges and universities."

What was then Trinity College was under financial duress when McGuire took the helm in 1989. She assumed the office as the college's sixth president in eight years. A generation later, Trinity is booming. Enrollments have more than doubled, successful capital campaigns have been completed, award-winning buildings now enrich the campus, and academic programs have been expanded-including the only degree program in Washington's poorest neighborhood.

Trinity has reached these goals while staying true to its Catholic mission to ensure justice for all, and remaining rooted in the historic tradition of women's colleges to transform and empower women through education. Seventy percent of Trinity's student body qualifies for Pell Grants, a majority of students are the first in their family to attend college, and 90 percent are minority. Trinity serves more District of Columbia public school graduates than any other private institution in the nation.

McGuire's commitment to higher education for all goes far beyond the students she serves at Trinity.

NAICU has long relied on her to represent independent higher education at the federal level. McGuire has testified before congressional tax, banking, education, and funding committees. She has spoken at Capitol Hill rallies. She has served on Department of Education panels. She has defended student aid, once warning a banking committee-when the housing bubble first burst in 2008-that student loans could be at risk if the federal government didn't act. McGuire has defended universities against taxation through her articulate defense of higher education and all non-profits-using her personal credibility as a president who makes a conscious decision to pay for her own off-campus home, car, and travel.

"In deep appreciation for all she has done for the association, for the colleges and the students we serve, and for her continuing crusade in support of higher education, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is pleased to honor the contributions of Pat McGuire," Warren said.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

 

Media Contact:

Tony Pals
tony@naicu.edu
direct office: (202) 739-0474
cell: (202) 288-9333

WASHINGTON, D.C., Jan. 31-Patricia McGuire, president of Trinity Washington University received the 2012 Henry Paley Memorial Award today from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). She received the award from NAICU President David L. Warren and Herbert Tillery, executive director of the College Success Foundation - District of Columbia, at the NAICU 2012 Annual Meeting. The meeting is being held in Washington, D.C., at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education. The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States. The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984.

"Pat McGuire is an icon of higher education leadership," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "She has transformed her institution into a national model of private, nonprofit higher education serving a public purpose, and is a tireless, passionate, and articulate voice for the value of America's colleges and universities."

What was then Trinity College was under financial duress when McGuire took the helm in 1989. She assumed the office as the college's sixth president in eight years. A generation later, Trinity is booming. Enrollments have more than doubled, successful capital campaigns have been completed, award-winning buildings now enrich the campus, and academic programs have been expanded-including the only degree program in Washington's poorest neighborhood.

Trinity has reached these goals while staying true to its Catholic mission to ensure justice for all, and remaining rooted in the historic tradition of women's colleges to transform and empower women through education. Seventy percent of Trinity's student body qualifies for Pell Grants, a majority of students are the first in their family to attend college, and 90 percent are minority. Trinity serves more District of Columbia public school graduates than any other private institution in the nation.

McGuire's commitment to higher education for all goes far beyond the students she serves at Trinity.

NAICU has long relied on her to represent independent higher education at the federal level. McGuire has testified before congressional tax, banking, education, and funding committees. She has spoken at Capitol Hill rallies. She has served on Department of Education panels. She has defended student aid, once warning a banking committee-when the housing bubble first burst in 2008-that student loans could be at risk if the federal government didn't act. McGuire has defended universities against taxation through her articulate defense of higher education and all non-profits-using her personal credibility as a president who makes a conscious decision to pay for her own off-campus home, car, and travel.

"In deep appreciation for all she has done for the association, for the colleges and the students we serve, and for her continuing crusade in support of higher education, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is pleased to honor the contributions of Pat McGuire," Warren said.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

 

Media Contact:

Tony Pals
tony@naicu.edu
direct office: (202) 739-0474
cell: (202) 288-9333

January 31, 2012

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