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Trinity Washington University President Patricia McGuire Receives 2012 Paley Award for Service to Independent Higher Education

Trinity Washington University President Patricia McGuire Receives 2...

January 31, 2012

WASHINGTON, D.C., Jan. 31-Patricia McGuire, president of Trinity Washington University received the 2012 Henry Paley Memorial Award today from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). She received the award from NAICU President David L. Warren and Herbert Tillery, executive director of the College Success Foundation - District of Columbia, at the NAICU 2012 Annual Meeting. The meeting is being held in Washington, D.C., at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education. The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States. The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984.

"Pat McGuire is an icon of higher education leadership," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "She has transformed her institution into a national model of private, nonprofit higher education serving a public purpose, and is a tireless, passionate, and articulate voice for the value of America's colleges and universities."

What was then Trinity College was under financial duress when McGuire took the helm in 1989. She assumed the office as the college's sixth president in eight years. A generation later, Trinity is booming. Enrollments have more than doubled, successful capital campaigns have been completed, award-winning buildings now enrich the campus, and academic programs have been expanded-including the only degree program in Washington's poorest neighborhood.

Trinity has reached these goals while staying true to its Catholic mission to ensure justice for all, and remaining rooted in the historic tradition of women's colleges to transform and empower women through education. Seventy percent of Trinity's student body qualifies for Pell Grants, a majority of students are the first in their family to attend college, and 90 percent are minority. Trinity serves more District of Columbia public school graduates than any other private institution in the nation.

McGuire's commitment to higher education for all goes far beyond the students she serves at Trinity.

NAICU has long relied on her to represent independent higher education at the federal level. McGuire has testified before congressional tax, banking, education, and funding committees. She has spoken at Capitol Hill rallies. She has served on Department of Education panels. She has defended student aid, once warning a banking committee-when the housing bubble first burst in 2008-that student loans could be at risk if the federal government didn't act. McGuire has defended universities against taxation through her articulate defense of higher education and all non-profits-using her personal credibility as a president who makes a conscious decision to pay for her own off-campus home, car, and travel.

"In deep appreciation for all she has done for the association, for the colleges and the students we serve, and for her continuing crusade in support of higher education, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is pleased to honor the contributions of Pat McGuire," Warren said.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

 

Media Contact:

Tony Pals
tony@naicu.edu
direct office: (202) 739-0474
cell: (202) 288-9333

WASHINGTON, D.C., Jan. 31-Patricia McGuire, president of Trinity Washington University received the 2012 Henry Paley Memorial Award today from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). She received the award from NAICU President David L. Warren and Herbert Tillery, executive director of the College Success Foundation - District of Columbia, at the NAICU 2012 Annual Meeting. The meeting is being held in Washington, D.C., at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education. The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States. The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984.

"Pat McGuire is an icon of higher education leadership," said NAICU President David L. Warren. "She has transformed her institution into a national model of private, nonprofit higher education serving a public purpose, and is a tireless, passionate, and articulate voice for the value of America's colleges and universities."

What was then Trinity College was under financial duress when McGuire took the helm in 1989. She assumed the office as the college's sixth president in eight years. A generation later, Trinity is booming. Enrollments have more than doubled, successful capital campaigns have been completed, award-winning buildings now enrich the campus, and academic programs have been expanded-including the only degree program in Washington's poorest neighborhood.

Trinity has reached these goals while staying true to its Catholic mission to ensure justice for all, and remaining rooted in the historic tradition of women's colleges to transform and empower women through education. Seventy percent of Trinity's student body qualifies for Pell Grants, a majority of students are the first in their family to attend college, and 90 percent are minority. Trinity serves more District of Columbia public school graduates than any other private institution in the nation.

McGuire's commitment to higher education for all goes far beyond the students she serves at Trinity.

NAICU has long relied on her to represent independent higher education at the federal level. McGuire has testified before congressional tax, banking, education, and funding committees. She has spoken at Capitol Hill rallies. She has served on Department of Education panels. She has defended student aid, once warning a banking committee-when the housing bubble first burst in 2008-that student loans could be at risk if the federal government didn't act. McGuire has defended universities against taxation through her articulate defense of higher education and all non-profits-using her personal credibility as a president who makes a conscious decision to pay for her own off-campus home, car, and travel.

"In deep appreciation for all she has done for the association, for the colleges and the students we serve, and for her continuing crusade in support of higher education, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is pleased to honor the contributions of Pat McGuire," Warren said.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. With more than 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 90 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

 

Media Contact:

Tony Pals
tony@naicu.edu
direct office: (202) 739-0474
cell: (202) 288-9333

January 31, 2012

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White House Official, Private College Presidents to Address Higher Education Affordability at Jan. 31 NAICU Annual Meeting Session

White House Official, Private College Presidents to Address Higher ...

January 27, 2012

Related Sessions Examine Rising College Costs and Challenges to Access; and Institutional Strategies for Rethinking the Higher Education Model

WASHINGTON, D.C., Jan. 27-A week after President Barack Obama warned colleges and universities in his State of the Union address that they were "on notice" to keep tuition increases in check or risk losing federal money, senior White House education adviser Zakiya Smith and three private college presidents will address higher education affordability on Tuesday, Jan. 31, at a panel session titled "College Affordability: Issues and Solutions."

The session, part of the NAICU 2012 Annual Meeting (Jan. 29 - Feb. 1), will run 11 a.m. to noon on Tuesday, Jan. 31, at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

As part of the panel discussion, Smith will elaborate on President Obama's proposal, released today, to tie colleges' eligibility for campus-based student aid programs to institutional success in enhancing affordability and value for students. She is expected to take questions from audience members.

NAICU's annual meeting will draw up to 400 private college and university leaders. Media registration information is available online at www.naicu.edu/AnnMtgMediaReg.

Joining Smith on the affordability panel will be Hardin-Simmons University President Lanny Hall; Huntington University President Blair Dowden; and William Peace University President Debra Townsley.

All three institutions have announced new affordability initiatives for 2012-13. Hardin-Simmons is freezing tuition at the 2011-12 rate, and giving incoming students the opportunity to lock it in for as long as they are enrolled. Huntington is increasing tuition by the lowest rate in recent memory, and has begun to offer a loan repayment assistance program to students. William Peace is cutting tuition by 7.7 percent.

Related NAICU Annual Meeting Sessions:

Monday, Jan. 30 - 3:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.: Economists Robert Archibald and David Feldman, coauthors of Why Does College Cost So Much?, will address tuition trends, federal and institutional financial aid policies, and the growing threat to access.

Wednesday, Feb. 1. - 9:15 a.m. to 10 a.m.: In a session titled "Staying Ahead of the Curve: Rethinking the Higher Education Model," the presidents of Heritage University, Saint Leo University, and Sewanee: The University of the South will examine creative, unconventional strategies being undertaken by their colleges as the "new normal" forces higher education to re-evaluate tuition and student aid strategies, revenue sources, educational and administrative efficiency measures, and academic programs and delivery options.

The full NAICU 2012 Annual Meeting schedule is available at www.naicu.edu/AnnMtgSchedule.

Media registration information is available online at www.naicu.edu/AnnMtgMediaReg.

The NAICU annual meeting Twitter hashtag is #naicu12.

Media Contact:

Tony Pals
tony@naicu.edu
direct office: (202) 739-0474
cell: (202) 288-9333

 

Related Sessions Examine Rising College Costs and Challenges to Access; and Institutional Strategies for Rethinking the Higher Education Model

WASHINGTON, D.C., Jan. 27-A week after President Barack Obama warned colleges and universities in his State of the Union address that they were "on notice" to keep tuition increases in check or risk losing federal money, senior White House education adviser Zakiya Smith and three private college presidents will address higher education affordability on Tuesday, Jan. 31, at a panel session titled "College Affordability: Issues and Solutions."

The session, part of the NAICU 2012 Annual Meeting (Jan. 29 - Feb. 1), will run 11 a.m. to noon on Tuesday, Jan. 31, at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

As part of the panel discussion, Smith will elaborate on President Obama's proposal, released today, to tie colleges' eligibility for campus-based student aid programs to institutional success in enhancing affordability and value for students. She is expected to take questions from audience members.

NAICU's annual meeting will draw up to 400 private college and university leaders. Media registration information is available online at www.naicu.edu/AnnMtgMediaReg.

Joining Smith on the affordability panel will be Hardin-Simmons University President Lanny Hall; Huntington University President Blair Dowden; and William Peace University President Debra Townsley.

All three institutions have announced new affordability initiatives for 2012-13. Hardin-Simmons is freezing tuition at the 2011-12 rate, and giving incoming students the opportunity to lock it in for as long as they are enrolled. Huntington is increasing tuition by the lowest rate in recent memory, and has begun to offer a loan repayment assistance program to students. William Peace is cutting tuition by 7.7 percent.

Related NAICU Annual Meeting Sessions:

Monday, Jan. 30 - 3:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.: Economists Robert Archibald and David Feldman, coauthors of Why Does College Cost So Much?, will address tuition trends, federal and institutional financial aid policies, and the growing threat to access.

Wednesday, Feb. 1. - 9:15 a.m. to 10 a.m.: In a session titled "Staying Ahead of the Curve: Rethinking the Higher Education Model," the presidents of Heritage University, Saint Leo University, and Sewanee: The University of the South will examine creative, unconventional strategies being undertaken by their colleges as the "new normal" forces higher education to re-evaluate tuition and student aid strategies, revenue sources, educational and administrative efficiency measures, and academic programs and delivery options.

The full NAICU 2012 Annual Meeting schedule is available at www.naicu.edu/AnnMtgSchedule.

Media registration information is available online at www.naicu.edu/AnnMtgMediaReg.

The NAICU annual meeting Twitter hashtag is #naicu12.

Media Contact:

Tony Pals
tony@naicu.edu
direct office: (202) 739-0474
cell: (202) 288-9333

 

January 27, 2012

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Statement by NAICU President David L. Warren on President Obama’s Higher Education Proposals

Statement by NAICU President David L. Warren on President Obama’s H...

January 27, 2012

"We welcome the president's commitment to increasing the federal government's investment in student assistance, including his call for doubling Federal Work-Study funding, expanding the Perkins Loan program, and making the tuition tax credit permanent. We also welcome a more robust conversation on college affordability.

The presidents of private, nonprofit colleges and universities understand the challenges facing students and families who are struggling to afford a quality college education. Independent institutions nationwide are redoubling efforts to cut operating costs, enhance efficiency, and, most important, keep students' out-of-pocket costs as low as possible, while maintaining access for students from all backgrounds and protecting academic quality.

The collective challenge facing the nation is to make college more affordable, without losing our position of having the best higher education system in the world-one in which all Americans can take pride.

The answer is going to come by having colleges continue the on-going, daily work being done to find efficiencies in delivering a quality education. We must continue to do so without cutting support to those students who need extra academic and financial help to stay in school. It will come by having the federal government continue to provide financial support to low-income students who are willing to work hard. And it will come with the federal government also highlighting and encouraging innovative and cost-reducing practices by colleges that can be shared and duplicated.

In short, colleges, states, and the federal government must work together in a climate of mutual trust and collaboration. The answer is not going to come from more federal controls on colleges or states, or by telling families to judge the value of an education by the amount young graduates earn in the first few years after they graduate.

Together, we must ensure the president's proposal does not have unintended consequences for students. Low-income students must not lose the opportunity to use their aid to attend the college that best fits their academic needs, and at which they are most likely to succeed. Students must not see a decline in educational quality and reduced academic support services, if colleges have to start cutting corners.

If colleges are forced toward a more uniform federal model, the range of higher education options for students will shrink, in both the private and public sectors.

Collectively, we must build upon a system that promotes competition, quality, and choice, and brings all the benefits of a free economy to American higher education. Our institutions look forward to working with the administration, Congress, and all of higher education to ensure that college is available to all hard-working Americans."

Media Contact:

Tony Pals
tony@naicu.edu
direct office: (202) 739-0474
cell: (202) 288-9333

 

"We welcome the president's commitment to increasing the federal government's investment in student assistance, including his call for doubling Federal Work-Study funding, expanding the Perkins Loan program, and making the tuition tax credit permanent. We also welcome a more robust conversation on college affordability.

The presidents of private, nonprofit colleges and universities understand the challenges facing students and families who are struggling to afford a quality college education. Independent institutions nationwide are redoubling efforts to cut operating costs, enhance efficiency, and, most important, keep students' out-of-pocket costs as low as possible, while maintaining access for students from all backgrounds and protecting academic quality.

The collective challenge facing the nation is to make college more affordable, without losing our position of having the best higher education system in the world-one in which all Americans can take pride.

The answer is going to come by having colleges continue the on-going, daily work being done to find efficiencies in delivering a quality education. We must continue to do so without cutting support to those students who need extra academic and financial help to stay in school. It will come by having the federal government continue to provide financial support to low-income students who are willing to work hard. And it will come with the federal government also highlighting and encouraging innovative and cost-reducing practices by colleges that can be shared and duplicated.

In short, colleges, states, and the federal government must work together in a climate of mutual trust and collaboration. The answer is not going to come from more federal controls on colleges or states, or by telling families to judge the value of an education by the amount young graduates earn in the first few years after they graduate.

Together, we must ensure the president's proposal does not have unintended consequences for students. Low-income students must not lose the opportunity to use their aid to attend the college that best fits their academic needs, and at which they are most likely to succeed. Students must not see a decline in educational quality and reduced academic support services, if colleges have to start cutting corners.

If colleges are forced toward a more uniform federal model, the range of higher education options for students will shrink, in both the private and public sectors.

Collectively, we must build upon a system that promotes competition, quality, and choice, and brings all the benefits of a free economy to American higher education. Our institutions look forward to working with the administration, Congress, and all of higher education to ensure that college is available to all hard-working Americans."

Media Contact:

Tony Pals
tony@naicu.edu
direct office: (202) 739-0474
cell: (202) 288-9333

 

January 27, 2012

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NAICU 2012 Annual Meeting to Address College Affordability, Federal Budget Outlook, Future of the Higher Education Model, Education Reform, and More

NAICU 2012 Annual Meeting to Address College Affordability, Federal...

January 18, 2012

For Immediate Release

2012 NAICU Annual Meeting

Hundreds of private college and university presidents will meet with House Appropriations Chairman Rep. Harold "Hal" Rogers; Senior White House Education Advisor Zakiya Smith; Education Analyst and Writer Diane Ravitch; Historian & Author Douglas Brinkley; United Technologies Corporation CEO Louis Chênevert; and other speakers to explore the challenges and opportunities facing higher education, America's college students, and the nation.

WHEN:

January 29 - February 1

WHERE:

Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill
400 New Jersey Avenue, NW
Washington, D.C.
202-737-1234

Among the Questions Addressed:

●  How might the current federal budget and the year ahead in Congress affect federal student aid and the nation?

●  How can colleges better control their costs and enhance affordability?

●  How are colleges rethinking the higher education model to survive and thrive in the "new normal"?

●  How will the next phrase of education reform affect higher education and the nation's students?

●  What is the role of American business in providing higher education opportunities for employees?

●  How has Obama's election changed the course of American history?

●  How can college presidents work most effectively with their boards and senior administration teams?

●  What are best practices for creating and implementing online programs?

Among the Speakers:

●  House Appropriations Chairman Rep. Harold "Hal" Rogers

●  Senior White House Education Advisor Zakiya Smith

●  Education Analyst and Writer Diane Ravitch

●  Historian & Author Douglas Brinkley

●  Economists & Authors Robert Archibald & David Feldman, Why Does College Cost So Much?

●  NAICU Award Recipients United Technologies Corporation (represented by CEO Louis Chênevert) and Trinity Washington University President Patricia McGuire

●  Chronicle of Higher Education Editorial Director Jeff Selingo

●  The Presidents of: Hardin-Simmons University; Heritage University; Huntington University; Saint Leo University; Sewanee: The University of the South; Stevenson University; & Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges and Universities

●  Higher Education Leadership, Management and Marketing Experts from: Diversified Investment Advisors; GDA Integrated Services; The Learning House; Performa Higher Education; Seigenthaler Public Relations; SimpsonScarborough; SRP Consulting; & Stamats

Schedule of Events: www.naicu.edu/AnnMtgSchedule (check back regularly for updates)

Media Registration: Form available at www.naicu.edu/AnnMtgMediaReg, or by calling 202-739-0474 (direct office) or 202-288-9333 (cell). You may also email your name, title, organization, and contact information to mediaregistration@naicu.edu

Annual Meeting Twitter Hashtag: #naicu12

Media Contact:

Tony Pals
tony@naicu.edu
direct office: (202) 739-0474
cell: (202) 288-9333

For Immediate Release

2012 NAICU Annual Meeting

Hundreds of private college and university presidents will meet with House Appropriations Chairman Rep. Harold "Hal" Rogers; Senior White House Education Advisor Zakiya Smith; Education Analyst and Writer Diane Ravitch; Historian & Author Douglas Brinkley; United Technologies Corporation CEO Louis Chênevert; and other speakers to explore the challenges and opportunities facing higher education, America's college students, and the nation.

WHEN:

January 29 - February 1

WHERE:

Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill
400 New Jersey Avenue, NW
Washington, D.C.
202-737-1234

Among the Questions Addressed:

●  How might the current federal budget and the year ahead in Congress affect federal student aid and the nation?

●  How can colleges better control their costs and enhance affordability?

●  How are colleges rethinking the higher education model to survive and thrive in the "new normal"?

●  How will the next phrase of education reform affect higher education and the nation's students?

●  What is the role of American business in providing higher education opportunities for employees?

●  How has Obama's election changed the course of American history?

●  How can college presidents work most effectively with their boards and senior administration teams?

●  What are best practices for creating and implementing online programs?

Among the Speakers:

●  House Appropriations Chairman Rep. Harold "Hal" Rogers

●  Senior White House Education Advisor Zakiya Smith

●  Education Analyst and Writer Diane Ravitch

●  Historian & Author Douglas Brinkley

●  Economists & Authors Robert Archibald & David Feldman, Why Does College Cost So Much?

●  NAICU Award Recipients United Technologies Corporation (represented by CEO Louis Chênevert) and Trinity Washington University President Patricia McGuire

●  Chronicle of Higher Education Editorial Director Jeff Selingo

●  The Presidents of: Hardin-Simmons University; Heritage University; Huntington University; Saint Leo University; Sewanee: The University of the South; Stevenson University; & Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges and Universities

●  Higher Education Leadership, Management and Marketing Experts from: Diversified Investment Advisors; GDA Integrated Services; The Learning House; Performa Higher Education; Seigenthaler Public Relations; SimpsonScarborough; SRP Consulting; & Stamats

Schedule of Events: www.naicu.edu/AnnMtgSchedule (check back regularly for updates)

Media Registration: Form available at www.naicu.edu/AnnMtgMediaReg, or by calling 202-739-0474 (direct office) or 202-288-9333 (cell). You may also email your name, title, organization, and contact information to mediaregistration@naicu.edu

Annual Meeting Twitter Hashtag: #naicu12

Media Contact:

Tony Pals
tony@naicu.edu
direct office: (202) 739-0474
cell: (202) 288-9333

January 18, 2012

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Statement by NAICU President David L. Warren on Executive Compensation at Private Nonprofit Colleges and Universities

Statement by NAICU President David L. Warren on Executive Compensat...

December 05, 2011

(Note: The Chronicle of Higher Education today released its annual report on executive compensation at private, nonprofit colleges and universities. According to the study, median compensation (salary and benefits) was $385,909 for 2009, a 2.2 percent increase over 2008. Of the nation's 1,600 private, nonprofit colleges, 36 provided compensation of more than $1 million.)

The salaries of executives at private, nonprofit colleges and universities reflect supply and demand. Searches for these positions at a significant number of independent institutions are highly competitive, and colleges must offer compensation packages that attract qualified leaders. Salaries are largely set through marketplace studies.

Trustees, as fiduciaries of their institutions, generally exercise careful judgment in setting compensation levels and fringe benefits in consideration of the job market in higher education and beyond, and in light of generally accepted standards of propriety. A board's decisions will vary by institution, depending on such factors as marketplace, budget, and the specific challenges faced by the institution. 

The job of college president has changed dramatically in the last 30 years, as have the demands. There is just a small pool of candidates who possess the skill set that is required, and are willing to take on the stressful 24/7 nature of the position.

Presidents must have fundraising expertise, political savvy, solid management experience, a strong business sense, the ability to develop and deliver an educational vision for the institution, negotiating and mediating skills, and the ability to represent the college effectively to diverse stakeholders. Presidents must be capable of administrating organizations with thousands of employees and budgets reaching hundreds of millions of dollars at many larger institutions.

Private college leaders face increased pressure on many fronts: budgetary challenges brought on by the economic downturn, uncertainty about the long-term sustainability of higher education's traditional financial model, calls for further government regulation, greater competition from public and for-profit institutions, growing student financial need, and consumer concerns about growing sticker prices.

A study by the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) illustrates the impact of the growing pressures of the job on the size of the pool of qualified candidates. CIC reports that less than one in four chief academic officers at private colleges plan to pursue a presidency.

Presidential salaries make up a very small percentage of overall campus budgets, and have virtually no impact on tuition increases. In fact, inflation-adjusted net tuition at private, nonprofit colleges and universities actually declined by 4.1 percent in the past five years, according to the College Board.

### 

 

(Note: The Chronicle of Higher Education today released its annual report on executive compensation at private, nonprofit colleges and universities. According to the study, median compensation (salary and benefits) was $385,909 for 2009, a 2.2 percent increase over 2008. Of the nation's 1,600 private, nonprofit colleges, 36 provided compensation of more than $1 million.)

The salaries of executives at private, nonprofit colleges and universities reflect supply and demand. Searches for these positions at a significant number of independent institutions are highly competitive, and colleges must offer compensation packages that attract qualified leaders. Salaries are largely set through marketplace studies.

Trustees, as fiduciaries of their institutions, generally exercise careful judgment in setting compensation levels and fringe benefits in consideration of the job market in higher education and beyond, and in light of generally accepted standards of propriety. A board's decisions will vary by institution, depending on such factors as marketplace, budget, and the specific challenges faced by the institution. 

The job of college president has changed dramatically in the last 30 years, as have the demands. There is just a small pool of candidates who possess the skill set that is required, and are willing to take on the stressful 24/7 nature of the position.

Presidents must have fundraising expertise, political savvy, solid management experience, a strong business sense, the ability to develop and deliver an educational vision for the institution, negotiating and mediating skills, and the ability to represent the college effectively to diverse stakeholders. Presidents must be capable of administrating organizations with thousands of employees and budgets reaching hundreds of millions of dollars at many larger institutions.

Private college leaders face increased pressure on many fronts: budgetary challenges brought on by the economic downturn, uncertainty about the long-term sustainability of higher education's traditional financial model, calls for further government regulation, greater competition from public and for-profit institutions, growing student financial need, and consumer concerns about growing sticker prices.

A study by the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) illustrates the impact of the growing pressures of the job on the size of the pool of qualified candidates. CIC reports that less than one in four chief academic officers at private colleges plan to pursue a presidency.

Presidential salaries make up a very small percentage of overall campus budgets, and have virtually no impact on tuition increases. In fact, inflation-adjusted net tuition at private, nonprofit colleges and universities actually declined by 4.1 percent in the past five years, according to the College Board.

### 

 

December 05, 2011

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About the items posted on the NAICU site: News items, features, and opinion pieces posted on this site from sources outside NAICU do not necessarily reflect the position of the association or its members. Rather, this content reflects the diversity of issues and views that are shaping American higher education.

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