Presidential Opinion

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The Washington Post

Taxing George Washington’s Legacy — Like Chopping Down the Cherry Tree

Taxing George Washington’s Legacy — Like Chopping Down the Cherry Tree

January 18, 2018

William C. Dudley, president of Washington and Lee University (VA), writes:  In 1796, George Washington made a gift valued at $20,000 to a struggling classical school called Liberty Hall Academy. In recognition of the gift, Liberty Hall Academy became Washington College, which subsequently became Washington and Lee University in 1870.  More than 220 years after Washington made his donation, it remains part of Washington and Lee’s endowment and directly supports the education of every student at the university.  The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, signed into law on Dec. 22, 2017, imposes a 1.4 percent tax on the endowment earnings of about 30 private colleges and universities, including Washington and Lee, that have worked diligently to marshal the resources to provide students with an education of the highest quality.
William C. Dudley, president of Washington and Lee University (VA), writes:  In 1796, George Washington made a gift valued at $20,000 to a struggling classical school called Liberty Hall Academy. In recognition of the gift, Liberty Hall Academy became Washington College, which subsequently became Washington and Lee University in 1870.  More than 220 years after Washington made his donation, it remains part of Washington and Lee’s endowment and directly supports the education of every student at the university.  The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, signed into law on Dec. 22, 2017, imposes a 1.4 percent tax on the endowment earnings of about 30 private colleges and universities, including Washington and Lee, that have worked diligently to marshal the resources to provide students with an education of the highest quality.

January 18, 2018

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U.S. News & World Report

Colleges Make America Stronger

Colleges Make America Stronger

January 17, 2018

Clayton Rose, president of Bowdoin College (ME), writes: Selective colleges and universities are under fire in America for being too elite and too expensive, for impeding free speech, for not training graduates for the world of work, and for any number of other myths. These curious and distressing charges ignore the fact that these institutions continue to prepare students for success in their work, for thoughtful engagement in civic life, for lives of meaning, for lifelong learning and for understanding our world and those with whom we live.

 
Clayton Rose, president of Bowdoin College (ME), writes: Selective colleges and universities are under fire in America for being too elite and too expensive, for impeding free speech, for not training graduates for the world of work, and for any number of other myths. These curious and distressing charges ignore the fact that these institutions continue to prepare students for success in their work, for thoughtful engagement in civic life, for lives of meaning, for lifelong learning and for understanding our world and those with whom we live.

 

January 17, 2018

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The Hechinger Report

In Higher Ed, Lower Enrollment Isn’t the Only Sign of Trouble

In Higher Ed, Lower Enrollment Isn’t the Only Sign of Trouble

January 16, 2018

David Steele-Figueredo, president of Woodbury University (CA), writes: Various studies indicate that since about 2000, the preparedness of our graduates to enter the global economy has deteriorated, especially in literacy, numeracy and problem-solving skills required by a global, innovation-based economy. According to Joseph Fuller, a Harvard Business School professor, our students’ literacy and numerical skills have declined over the last two decades.
David Steele-Figueredo, president of Woodbury University (CA), writes: Various studies indicate that since about 2000, the preparedness of our graduates to enter the global economy has deteriorated, especially in literacy, numeracy and problem-solving skills required by a global, innovation-based economy. According to Joseph Fuller, a Harvard Business School professor, our students’ literacy and numerical skills have declined over the last two decades.

January 16, 2018

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Huffington Post

Teaching Reverence for the Truth Must Be an Essential Part of Any College Education

Teaching Reverence for the Truth Must Be an Essential Part of Any C...

January 11, 2018

Michael A. McRobbie, president of Indiana University, writes:  On Sunday, as part of her moving and well-received speech at the Golden Globe Awards telecast, Oprah Winfrey expressed gratitude to those individuals with an “insatiable dedication to uncovering the absolute truth that keeps us from turning a blind eye to corruption and to injustice.”  We might be wise to emblazon Winfrey’s words on the diplomas of all of today’s college graduates, who will enter what is increasingly being called the “post-truth era” — a time in which there is a growing and disturbingly widespread disregard of truth, and truth is increasingly ignored in favor of prejudice. 
Michael A. McRobbie, president of Indiana University, writes:  On Sunday, as part of her moving and well-received speech at the Golden Globe Awards telecast, Oprah Winfrey expressed gratitude to those individuals with an “insatiable dedication to uncovering the absolute truth that keeps us from turning a blind eye to corruption and to injustice.”  We might be wise to emblazon Winfrey’s words on the diplomas of all of today’s college graduates, who will enter what is increasingly being called the “post-truth era” — a time in which there is a growing and disturbingly widespread disregard of truth, and truth is increasingly ignored in favor of prejudice. 

January 11, 2018

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The Hechinger Report

Here’s a Reason to Help More Students Earn College Degrees — Adaptability

Here’s a Reason to Help More Students Earn College Degrees — Adapta...

December 19, 2017

John Bravman, president of Bucknell University (PA), writes: The demand for colleges and universities to justify their existence is greater than ever before. Parents and their students aren’t defining this demand in terms of the critical-thinking and leadership skills that broadly educated individuals gain. Rather, they are using as their gauge the size of the paychecks that students earn soon after graduation. This is understandable. 
John Bravman, president of Bucknell University (PA), writes: The demand for colleges and universities to justify their existence is greater than ever before. Parents and their students aren’t defining this demand in terms of the critical-thinking and leadership skills that broadly educated individuals gain. Rather, they are using as their gauge the size of the paychecks that students earn soon after graduation. This is understandable. 

December 19, 2017

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