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The Chronicle of Higher Education

Shared Governance Does Not Mean Shared Decision Making

Shared Governance Does Not Mean Shared Decision Making

August 14, 2018

Tulane University (LA) President Emeritus Scott S. Cowen writes: Over the course of my career, I’ve observed two speeds of governance: foot-on-the-brake for everyday business and pedal-to-the-metal for existential decisions. I’ve also grappled with how to honor the process of shared governance without slowing decision-making to a crawl, especially in situations that require immediate action. A first step is to make sure that everyone understands that the sharing in "shared governance" isn’t equally distributed, nor does it imply decision-making authority. That authority is held by the president and the board, the ones who are accountable for both results and shortcomings.
Tulane University (LA) President Emeritus Scott S. Cowen writes: Over the course of my career, I’ve observed two speeds of governance: foot-on-the-brake for everyday business and pedal-to-the-metal for existential decisions. I’ve also grappled with how to honor the process of shared governance without slowing decision-making to a crawl, especially in situations that require immediate action. A first step is to make sure that everyone understands that the sharing in "shared governance" isn’t equally distributed, nor does it imply decision-making authority. That authority is held by the president and the board, the ones who are accountable for both results and shortcomings.

August 14, 2018

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Inside Higher Ed

Lessons Learned from a College Merger

Lessons Learned from a College Merger

August 07, 2018

Robert A. Brown,  president of Boston University, and David J. Chard, former president of Wheelock College (MA) and interim dean of Wheelock College of Education and Human Development at Boston University, write: Lucy Wheelock founded Wheelock College (MA) in 1888 to train kindergarten teachers. The small private institution nestled in the Fenway neighborhood of Boston focused on improving the lives of children and families by training teachers and social workers. In 2017, with only 1,000 undergraduate and master’s students and a trend of declining enrollments, the future of Wheelock College was uncertain. Closure was not imminent, but it was definitely on the horizon.
Robert A. Brown,  president of Boston University, and David J. Chard, former president of Wheelock College (MA) and interim dean of Wheelock College of Education and Human Development at Boston University, write: Lucy Wheelock founded Wheelock College (MA) in 1888 to train kindergarten teachers. The small private institution nestled in the Fenway neighborhood of Boston focused on improving the lives of children and families by training teachers and social workers. In 2017, with only 1,000 undergraduate and master’s students and a trend of declining enrollments, the future of Wheelock College was uncertain. Closure was not imminent, but it was definitely on the horizon.

August 07, 2018

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The Washington Post

Crossing Borders: How 10 Universities Are Forging New Ties in the Americas

Crossing Borders: How 10 Universities Are Forging New Ties in the A...

August 03, 2018

Julio Frank, president of University of Miami (FL), writes: In an era often described with language of disruption and discord, much has been written about the special role universities can play to advance civil society. This typically centers on the way we build campus communities — to expand educational opportunity for students regardless of income, to ensure our campuses remain places for open and honest debate, and to support scholarship that pushes forward our understanding about the most consequential challenges of our times.
Julio Frank, president of University of Miami (FL), writes: In an era often described with language of disruption and discord, much has been written about the special role universities can play to advance civil society. This typically centers on the way we build campus communities — to expand educational opportunity for students regardless of income, to ensure our campuses remain places for open and honest debate, and to support scholarship that pushes forward our understanding about the most consequential challenges of our times.

August 03, 2018

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Inside Higher Ed

The Common Messages in Our Commencement Speeches

The Common Messages in Our Commencement Speeches

July 31, 2018

Thomas G. Burish, provost of the University of Notre Dame (IN), writes: Truth. Kindness. Dignity. Courage. Hope. They are not fields in which you can earn a degree. They are not things you would normally list under “other experience” on your résumé. And they do not necessarily represent subjects covered in college courses. Why then did so many commencement speakers at universities across the nation focus on them this year? Most likely it is because today these values seem to be in short supply.
Thomas G. Burish, provost of the University of Notre Dame (IN), writes: Truth. Kindness. Dignity. Courage. Hope. They are not fields in which you can earn a degree. They are not things you would normally list under “other experience” on your résumé. And they do not necessarily represent subjects covered in college courses. Why then did so many commencement speakers at universities across the nation focus on them this year? Most likely it is because today these values seem to be in short supply.

July 31, 2018

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The Washington Post

What Jeff Sessions Doesn’t Get About U.S. Higher Education and Political Correctness - Presidential Opinion

What Jeff Sessions Doesn’t Get About U.S. Higher Education and Poli...

July 31, 2018

Michael S. Roth, president of Wesleyan University (CT), writes: It would be hard to find a period in peacetime when our government has made a more concerted effort to undermine freedom of inquiry and expression. These attacks start with the press and extend to education. Every week President Trump takes aim at journalists, calling them “enemies” of the people, or deriding sources he dislikes as “fake news.” As many have documented, his administration has engaged in an assault on the very notions of investigation and truth, doubling down on lies about Russian cyberattacks, economic markets and tariffs, and his own past behavior.
Michael S. Roth, president of Wesleyan University (CT), writes: It would be hard to find a period in peacetime when our government has made a more concerted effort to undermine freedom of inquiry and expression. These attacks start with the press and extend to education. Every week President Trump takes aim at journalists, calling them “enemies” of the people, or deriding sources he dislikes as “fake news.” As many have documented, his administration has engaged in an assault on the very notions of investigation and truth, doubling down on lies about Russian cyberattacks, economic markets and tariffs, and his own past behavior.

July 31, 2018

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