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Chicago Tribune, IL

A Better Way to Keep Illinois College Students in the State

A Better Way to Keep Illinois College Students in the State

September 05, 2018

Eric Jensen, President, Illinois Wesleyan University writes: I agree that the state should take an active role in fighting so-called “brain drain,” and at our university we have taken actions aimed at retaining local students. But AIM HIGH focuses on the wrong target. As a first step, if legislators want to keep students in Illinois, they should do so by allocating more to the already-underfunded, need-based Monetary Award Program. As it is now, half the students in Illinois who qualify and apply for MAP are denied due to lack of funding.
Eric Jensen, President, Illinois Wesleyan University writes: I agree that the state should take an active role in fighting so-called “brain drain,” and at our university we have taken actions aimed at retaining local students. But AIM HIGH focuses on the wrong target. As a first step, if legislators want to keep students in Illinois, they should do so by allocating more to the already-underfunded, need-based Monetary Award Program. As it is now, half the students in Illinois who qualify and apply for MAP are denied due to lack of funding.

September 05, 2018

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CT News Junkie

Connecticut’s Achievement Gap Persists into Post-Secondary

Connecticut’s Achievement Gap Persists into Post-Secondary

August 30, 2018

John J. Petillo, Ph.D., president of Sacred Heart University (CT), writes:  In what should not come as a shock to anyone, Connecticut is failing to meet the educational needs of its minority and economically underprivileged students when it comes to college preparation and degree completion. And that failure is going to have long-term consequences when it comes to hiring and retaining workers in our state, attracting new businesses or keeping companies and organizations from fleeing to more business-friendly states with larger, better-prepared talent pools.
John J. Petillo, Ph.D., president of Sacred Heart University (CT), writes:  In what should not come as a shock to anyone, Connecticut is failing to meet the educational needs of its minority and economically underprivileged students when it comes to college preparation and degree completion. And that failure is going to have long-term consequences when it comes to hiring and retaining workers in our state, attracting new businesses or keeping companies and organizations from fleeing to more business-friendly states with larger, better-prepared talent pools.

August 30, 2018

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The Chronicle of Higher Education

How Colleges Should Deal with Their Kellyannes

How Colleges Should Deal with Their Kellyannes

August 30, 2018

Patricia McGuire, president of Trinity Washington University (DC), writes:  Even before Kellyanne Conway, counselor to President Trump, coined the phrase "alternative facts" about the size of the crowd at the 2017 inauguration, my inbox was bulging with messages about her role in Trump’s election. Some expressed pride and demanded that Trinity honor her for being the first woman to lead a successful presidential campaign. But many other messages were negative; some alumnae went so far as to insist that Trinity make a public statement dissociating the institution from her work. Famous graduates can pose real dilemmas for colleges when fame becomes notoriety. 
Patricia McGuire, president of Trinity Washington University (DC), writes:  Even before Kellyanne Conway, counselor to President Trump, coined the phrase "alternative facts" about the size of the crowd at the 2017 inauguration, my inbox was bulging with messages about her role in Trump’s election. Some expressed pride and demanded that Trinity honor her for being the first woman to lead a successful presidential campaign. But many other messages were negative; some alumnae went so far as to insist that Trinity make a public statement dissociating the institution from her work. Famous graduates can pose real dilemmas for colleges when fame becomes notoriety. 

August 30, 2018

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The Conversation.com

Making College More Affordable

Making College More Affordable

August 30, 2018

Jill Tiefenthaler, president of Colorado College; Eric J. Barron, president of Pennsylvania State University; and Reynold Verret, president of Xavier University of Louisiana; write about the cost of higher education in the U.S., and the signs of trouble the abound.
Jill Tiefenthaler, president of Colorado College; Eric J. Barron, president of Pennsylvania State University; and Reynold Verret, president of Xavier University of Louisiana; write about the cost of higher education in the U.S., and the signs of trouble the abound.

August 30, 2018

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The Chronicle of Higher Education

The ‘U.S. News’ College Rankings: a Modest Proposal

The ‘U.S. News’ College Rankings: a Modest Proposal

August 21, 2018

Brian Rosenberg, President, Macalester College writes: I have been assured by a very knowing Administrator of my acquaintance that many colleges are willing to spend a good deal of money to improve their position in The Rankings. I suggest, therefore, that U.S. News determine the order of its lists not on the basis of some complex and mysterious formula, but simply on the basis of money: To the highest bidder would go the highest ranking. Colleges would be encouraged to bid actively against one another, creating a spirited and friendly tournament. Since Swarthmore will always be able to offer more than Susquehanna, and Harvard more than Howard, there would be little alteration at the top of The Rankings. And, since no one much cares about the order of colleges beyond the first few dozen, any shuffling in the lower tiers would be of little consequence.
Brian Rosenberg, President, Macalester College writes: I have been assured by a very knowing Administrator of my acquaintance that many colleges are willing to spend a good deal of money to improve their position in The Rankings. I suggest, therefore, that U.S. News determine the order of its lists not on the basis of some complex and mysterious formula, but simply on the basis of money: To the highest bidder would go the highest ranking. Colleges would be encouraged to bid actively against one another, creating a spirited and friendly tournament. Since Swarthmore will always be able to offer more than Susquehanna, and Harvard more than Howard, there would be little alteration at the top of The Rankings. And, since no one much cares about the order of colleges beyond the first few dozen, any shuffling in the lower tiers would be of little consequence.

August 21, 2018

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