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The Hill

Pell Grants Have Leveled the College Playing Field for Low-Income Students — Let's Expand Them

Pell Grants Have Leveled the College Playing Field for Low-Income S...

September 15, 2021

Eric Spina, president of the University of Dayton and vice chair of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, which helps manage the national #DoublePell campaign, writes:  Financial hardships created by the pandemic continue to force college students to make the life-altering choice between their basic needs and their postsecondary ambitions. Dropping out costs them the additional $1 million in lifetime earnings expected for a bachelor's degree graduate and hinders the nation's economic recovery. 
Eric Spina, president of the University of Dayton and vice chair of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, which helps manage the national #DoublePell campaign, writes:  Financial hardships created by the pandemic continue to force college students to make the life-altering choice between their basic needs and their postsecondary ambitions. Dropping out costs them the additional $1 million in lifetime earnings expected for a bachelor's degree graduate and hinders the nation's economic recovery. 

September 15, 2021

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Fordham News

The Necessity of Doubling Pell Grant Awards

The Necessity of Doubling Pell Grant Awards

September 07, 2021

Fordham University President Joseph M. McShane, S.J., writes:  It’s back-to-school season for everyone from kindergarteners to college and university students. As the president of Fordham University, I relish the opportunity to welcome new students to campus and welcome back our continuing students. And yet I know there are some students accepted to colleges and universities across the country—including my own institution, at which we offer more than $185 million in financial aid for undergraduate students—who are not able to enroll this fall because they do not have the financial resources to pursue a college degree. This doesn’t have to be their reality; our country has programs and funding in place that can and should help make college accessible for all.
Fordham University President Joseph M. McShane, S.J., writes:  It’s back-to-school season for everyone from kindergarteners to college and university students. As the president of Fordham University, I relish the opportunity to welcome new students to campus and welcome back our continuing students. And yet I know there are some students accepted to colleges and universities across the country—including my own institution, at which we offer more than $185 million in financial aid for undergraduate students—who are not able to enroll this fall because they do not have the financial resources to pursue a college degree. This doesn’t have to be their reality; our country has programs and funding in place that can and should help make college accessible for all.

September 07, 2021

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The Chronicle of Higher Education

‘We as Humanists Are Not in a Monopoly’ - Interview

‘We as Humanists Are Not in a Monopoly’ - Interview

September 07, 2021

Leon Botstein, president of Bard College, on the liberal arts, philanthropy, and political repression.
Leon Botstein, president of Bard College, on the liberal arts, philanthropy, and political repression.

September 07, 2021

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Los Angeles Times

Colleges Need to Engage in a Financial Aid ‘Arms Race.’ Here’s How That Could Happen

Colleges Need to Engage in a Financial Aid ‘Arms Race.’ Here’s How ...

September 01, 2021

Denison University (OH) President  Adam Weinberg writes: Two of the most persistent challenges facing the U.S. are a lack of meaningful jobs and growing income inequality. And these problems are only getting worse. Sure, there are jobs out there, at fast-food restaurants or fulfillment warehouses desperate to hire someone — anyone. But what we really need are meaningful jobs that anchor people. This means positions that pay a livable wage, provide benefits and stability, and enhance skills so that people can eventually move on to even better jobs.

 
Denison University (OH) President  Adam Weinberg writes: Two of the most persistent challenges facing the U.S. are a lack of meaningful jobs and growing income inequality. And these problems are only getting worse. Sure, there are jobs out there, at fast-food restaurants or fulfillment warehouses desperate to hire someone — anyone. But what we really need are meaningful jobs that anchor people. This means positions that pay a livable wage, provide benefits and stability, and enhance skills so that people can eventually move on to even better jobs.

 

September 01, 2021

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Washington Business Journal

Doubling Pell Grant Max Is a Wise Investment for the Future

Doubling Pell Grant Max Is a Wise Investment for the Future

August 27, 2021

Marymount University President Irma Becerra writes: As the president of a minority-serving institution (MSI) in Marymount University, specifically the first designated Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) in Virginia, I am proud to be part of a community of institutions nationally that serve a critical role in leveling the playing field by providing quality postsecondary education to millions of minority students nationwide. A college degree has long stood as the key to economic mobility in America, what I refer to as the “great equalizer.” That’s why it is essential to ensure that low-income, first-generation and minority students can afford to attend institutions of higher education.
Marymount University President Irma Becerra writes: As the president of a minority-serving institution (MSI) in Marymount University, specifically the first designated Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) in Virginia, I am proud to be part of a community of institutions nationally that serve a critical role in leveling the playing field by providing quality postsecondary education to millions of minority students nationwide. A college degree has long stood as the key to economic mobility in America, what I refer to as the “great equalizer.” That’s why it is essential to ensure that low-income, first-generation and minority students can afford to attend institutions of higher education.

August 27, 2021

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