Presidential Opinion

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The Greenville News, SC

Why It's Important to Make Christian Education Accessible

Why It's Important to Make Christian Education Accessible

November 05, 2018

Gene C. Fant Jr., President, North Greenville University writes: In South Carolina, most of these institutions are foundationally Christian in ways that neither state universities can be nor elite private institutions wish to be. This means that these private institutions offer not only access for working families, but also the opportunity to pursue shared values between these families and the institutions.
Gene C. Fant Jr., President, North Greenville University writes: In South Carolina, most of these institutions are foundationally Christian in ways that neither state universities can be nor elite private institutions wish to be. This means that these private institutions offer not only access for working families, but also the opportunity to pursue shared values between these families and the institutions.

November 05, 2018

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Inside Higher Ed

Voting Is Good, but Higher Ed Must Do More

Voting Is Good, but Higher Ed Must Do More

November 01, 2018

Michael S. Roth, president of Wesleyan University (CT), writes: In a year when inducements to political violence have become normalized at the highest level, colleges and universities must do more than just encourage our students to vote. Free expression, free inquiry and fact-based discussion are essential to higher education, and we must protect them. Diversity and inclusion are core commitments, and so we must oppose those people who cultivate hatred against immigrants or trade in racist stereotypes. 
Michael S. Roth, president of Wesleyan University (CT), writes: In a year when inducements to political violence have become normalized at the highest level, colleges and universities must do more than just encourage our students to vote. Free expression, free inquiry and fact-based discussion are essential to higher education, and we must protect them. Diversity and inclusion are core commitments, and so we must oppose those people who cultivate hatred against immigrants or trade in racist stereotypes. 

November 01, 2018

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The Chronicle of Higher Education

How One College Leader Knows When It’s OK to Speak Out — or Keep Mum

How One College Leader Knows When It’s OK to Speak Out — or Keep Mum

November 01, 2018

Raynard S. Kington, president of Grinnell College (IA), writes: During my first year as president of Grinnell College, I needed guidance. I was an outsider to the world of elite liberal-arts college presidents in many ways, including that I came from the fields of medicine and science policy, and that my academic experience had been entirely in large, research-intensive organizations. As soon as it was available, I read Lessons Learned: Reflections of a University President, by a former president of Princeton University and the Mellon Foundation, William G. Bowen.  One idea that he put forth was especially relevant to the challenges I was facing — that colleges should exercise "institutional restraint" in speaking out on matters of public debate to preserve those institutions as "the home of the critic, not the critic itself" and to allow them to be places where all ideas may be debated and assessed. 
Raynard S. Kington, president of Grinnell College (IA), writes: During my first year as president of Grinnell College, I needed guidance. I was an outsider to the world of elite liberal-arts college presidents in many ways, including that I came from the fields of medicine and science policy, and that my academic experience had been entirely in large, research-intensive organizations. As soon as it was available, I read Lessons Learned: Reflections of a University President, by a former president of Princeton University and the Mellon Foundation, William G. Bowen.  One idea that he put forth was especially relevant to the challenges I was facing — that colleges should exercise "institutional restraint" in speaking out on matters of public debate to preserve those institutions as "the home of the critic, not the critic itself" and to allow them to be places where all ideas may be debated and assessed. 

November 01, 2018

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The Washington Post

University President: When I Heard the Pittsburgh News

University President: When I Heard the Pittsburgh News

October 31, 2018

Michael S. Roth, president of Wesleyan University (CT), writes:  Whenever I’m not busy with campus duties, I go to my shul on Saturday mornings to study Torah. When I returned to the Wesleyan campus after Saturday’s study session, I heard the news from Pittsburgh: A synagogue was attacked by a heavily armed anti-Semite, and there were fatalities. I know the Squirrel Hill neighborhood in that city, and I’ve been to my share of baby-naming ceremonies like the one that was taking place when the killer arrived. Like most Jews, I am also acquainted with hate-filled anti-Semites.
Michael S. Roth, president of Wesleyan University (CT), writes:  Whenever I’m not busy with campus duties, I go to my shul on Saturday mornings to study Torah. When I returned to the Wesleyan campus after Saturday’s study session, I heard the news from Pittsburgh: A synagogue was attacked by a heavily armed anti-Semite, and there were fatalities. I know the Squirrel Hill neighborhood in that city, and I’ve been to my share of baby-naming ceremonies like the one that was taking place when the killer arrived. Like most Jews, I am also acquainted with hate-filled anti-Semites.

October 31, 2018

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The Washington Post

Dear College Students: My Grandmother Waited 70 Years for the Right to Vote. Don’t Ignore This Chance.

Dear College Students: My Grandmother Waited 70 Years for the Right...

October 23, 2018

G. Gabrielle Starr, President, Pomona College writes: When the Voting Rights Act was passed in 1965, my grandmother had a new way to speak, nearly 70 years into her life. As a child in the 1970s and ’80s, I always knew when it was Election Day. My grandma got dressed in her Sunday best, put on her black shoes, hoisted her hard, black pocketbook, adjusted her hat, and waited by the door for my father to drive her to the polls. She never missed an election.
G. Gabrielle Starr, President, Pomona College writes: When the Voting Rights Act was passed in 1965, my grandmother had a new way to speak, nearly 70 years into her life. As a child in the 1970s and ’80s, I always knew when it was Election Day. My grandma got dressed in her Sunday best, put on her black shoes, hoisted her hard, black pocketbook, adjusted her hat, and waited by the door for my father to drive her to the polls. She never missed an election.

October 23, 2018

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