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NAICU President David Warren Comments on Amherst College's Decision to Eliminate Student Loans

NAICU President David Warren Comments on Amherst College's Decision...

July 20, 2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 20, 2007

CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu
office: (202) 739-0474 cell: (202) 288-9333

Statement by David L. Warren, President,
National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
on Amherst College's Elimination of Student Loans

July 20, 2007

Amherst College's decision to replace all loans with grants is a bold move that will help ensure access to an affordable, world-class education for students of modest means. It speaks forcefully about Amherst's deep commitment to educational equality.

The announcement will undoubtedly grab the attention of every president and board of directors in the nation, as they wrestle with how to keep their institutions accessible to an increasingly needy student population. While few of America's 1,500 private colleges and universities have the financial resources to follow Amherst's extraordinary example, the move adds kindling to the robust national conversation on these issues.

Amherst's decision not only follows similar moves by Princeton University and Davidson College, but is a dramatic example of the quiet revolution underway at the nation's private colleges and universities. In recent years, independent institutions have redoubled their efforts to ensure that student out-of-pocket costs remain as low as possible.

As individual institutional financial constraints allow, private colleges and universities are adopting enterprising approaches that are as diverse as private higher education itself. These innovative initiatives include cutting or freezing tuition, guaranteeing incoming students a four-year lock on tuition, reducing expected student and family contributions, eliminating loans for low-income students, and others.

Examples of institutional affordability initiatives are available on the NAICU web site at http://www.naicu.edu/docLib/20070720_enhancing_affordability_07-07.pdf.

The online compilation also lists examples of how private colleges and universities are taking a page from the business world to control underlying costs and enhance operating efficiency. Initiatives include, but are not limited to, streamlining administration; outsourcing services; green-friendly construction and retrofitting; employee incentives to cut costs; and metropolitan, state, and national purchasing and academic consortia.

The actions of Amherst represent in a dramatic way the responsibility our institutions feel to use resources judiciously to best serve students. They are committed to enhancing access and affordability, and providing the best education possible for students from all backgrounds.

###

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 20, 2007

CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu
office: (202) 739-0474 cell: (202) 288-9333

Statement by David L. Warren, President,
National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
on Amherst College's Elimination of Student Loans

July 20, 2007

Amherst College's decision to replace all loans with grants is a bold move that will help ensure access to an affordable, world-class education for students of modest means. It speaks forcefully about Amherst's deep commitment to educational equality.

The announcement will undoubtedly grab the attention of every president and board of directors in the nation, as they wrestle with how to keep their institutions accessible to an increasingly needy student population. While few of America's 1,500 private colleges and universities have the financial resources to follow Amherst's extraordinary example, the move adds kindling to the robust national conversation on these issues.

Amherst's decision not only follows similar moves by Princeton University and Davidson College, but is a dramatic example of the quiet revolution underway at the nation's private colleges and universities. In recent years, independent institutions have redoubled their efforts to ensure that student out-of-pocket costs remain as low as possible.

As individual institutional financial constraints allow, private colleges and universities are adopting enterprising approaches that are as diverse as private higher education itself. These innovative initiatives include cutting or freezing tuition, guaranteeing incoming students a four-year lock on tuition, reducing expected student and family contributions, eliminating loans for low-income students, and others.

Examples of institutional affordability initiatives are available on the NAICU web site at http://www.naicu.edu/docLib/20070720_enhancing_affordability_07-07.pdf.

The online compilation also lists examples of how private colleges and universities are taking a page from the business world to control underlying costs and enhance operating efficiency. Initiatives include, but are not limited to, streamlining administration; outsourcing services; green-friendly construction and retrofitting; employee incentives to cut costs; and metropolitan, state, and national purchasing and academic consortia.

The actions of Amherst represent in a dramatic way the responsibility our institutions feel to use resources judiciously to best serve students. They are committed to enhancing access and affordability, and providing the best education possible for students from all backgrounds.

###

July 20, 2007

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Charitable IRA Rollover Generates $70 Million in Donations at Private Colleges and Universities, in Its First Five Months

Charitable IRA Rollover Generates $70 Million in Donations at Priva...

April 12, 2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                    CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu
April 12, 2007                                    office: 202-739-0474     cell: 202-288-9333
 
WASHINGTON, DC, April 12 - New survey results from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities show that the IRA charitable rollover has had a significant impact on philanthropic giving at private institutions. 
 
The temporary federal tax provision, which was approved by Congress for the first time in August 2006, generated more than $70 million in new contributions in its first five months of existence.  IRA rollover gifts were reported by 70 percent of the responding colleges and universities, with an average of 10 gifts per institution. 
 
Nearly two-thirds of respondents designate using funds for student financial aid.  Other categories of use include, but are not limited to, annual funds, academic programs, loan repayment assistance, travel funds for study-abroad students, graduate fellowships, and faculty salaries.
 
The rollover allows individuals age 70-1/2 and older to withdraw funds from either a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA, and make direct gifts to any public charity.  Current law requires individuals to start withdrawing IRA funds at this age.  The rollover provision allows excess funds not necessary for retirement purposes to be donated to charities, including colleges and universities.  Gifts are limited to $100,000 per person, per year. 
 
Without congressional action, the provision will expire on December 31, 2007. 
 
Eighty-four percent of respondents believe there is a definite potential for increased giving with an expansion and extension of the IRA rollover.  Many development offices report that they have donors interested in continuing making gifts beyond 2007 as a result of the rollover.
 
Most of the college officials responding believe that making three changes to the provision will further increase giving:
 
* Allowing gifts at a lower age limit (71 percent of respondents)
* Expanding the rollover to allow indirect gifts (65 percent of respondents)
* Removing the cap on the amount that could be given (58 percent of respondents)
 
"Ultimately, it is students who benefit from the IRA rollover," said NAICU president David L. Warren. "The new revenue it generates is proving to be a reliable funding source for new institutional grant aid.  It is also improving the overall quality of the academic experience.
 
"Congress needs to extend or make permanent the successful rollover in order to keep these philanthropic gifts flowing and benefiting students," Warren added.
 
NAICU conducted the IRA rollover survey from January to March 2007, with 690 private non-for-profit institutions responding.
 
NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education.  With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions.  They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions. 

###
 
What Colleges Are Saying about the Charitable IRA Rollover
 
Carroll College
Helena, Montana
$101,000 in IRA rollover gifts (August 2006 - January 2007)

"There is great potential for additional gifts through the charitable rollover.  We have received numerous inquiries, several new donations, and additional pledges for this year.  I am convinced that with enough time to turn donor interest into action, we would further benefit." 

- Richard Ortega, vice president for advancement, Carroll College
 
Texas Christian University
Fort Worth, Texas
$229,835 in IRA rollover gifts (August 2006 - January 2007)

"TCU received $229,835 in new gifts as a result of IRA rollover.  The funds were directed to scholarships, capital projects, and more.  We consider the rollover to be a major incentive in our overall planned giving and fund raising program. And we expect that it will be even more productive for us in the future."
 
- Victor Boschini, chancellor, Texas Christian University
 
Wartburg College
Waverly, Iowa
$203,031 in IRA rollover gifts (August 2006 - January 2007)

"Educating donors and the college's advancement professionals was an important component in our initial marketing plan regarding the IRA rollover.  As our donors and staff become more familiar and comfortable with the process, we feel the potential for new gifts will continue to grow. Consequently, we encourage Congress to continue the rollover option, which will significantly impact students in positive ways."
 
- Jack Ohle, president, Wartburg College
 
 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                    CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu
April 12, 2007                                    office: 202-739-0474     cell: 202-288-9333
 
WASHINGTON, DC, April 12 - New survey results from the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities show that the IRA charitable rollover has had a significant impact on philanthropic giving at private institutions. 
 
The temporary federal tax provision, which was approved by Congress for the first time in August 2006, generated more than $70 million in new contributions in its first five months of existence.  IRA rollover gifts were reported by 70 percent of the responding colleges and universities, with an average of 10 gifts per institution. 
 
Nearly two-thirds of respondents designate using funds for student financial aid.  Other categories of use include, but are not limited to, annual funds, academic programs, loan repayment assistance, travel funds for study-abroad students, graduate fellowships, and faculty salaries.
 
The rollover allows individuals age 70-1/2 and older to withdraw funds from either a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA, and make direct gifts to any public charity.  Current law requires individuals to start withdrawing IRA funds at this age.  The rollover provision allows excess funds not necessary for retirement purposes to be donated to charities, including colleges and universities.  Gifts are limited to $100,000 per person, per year. 
 
Without congressional action, the provision will expire on December 31, 2007. 
 
Eighty-four percent of respondents believe there is a definite potential for increased giving with an expansion and extension of the IRA rollover.  Many development offices report that they have donors interested in continuing making gifts beyond 2007 as a result of the rollover.
 
Most of the college officials responding believe that making three changes to the provision will further increase giving:
 
* Allowing gifts at a lower age limit (71 percent of respondents)
* Expanding the rollover to allow indirect gifts (65 percent of respondents)
* Removing the cap on the amount that could be given (58 percent of respondents)
 
"Ultimately, it is students who benefit from the IRA rollover," said NAICU president David L. Warren. "The new revenue it generates is proving to be a reliable funding source for new institutional grant aid.  It is also improving the overall quality of the academic experience.
 
"Congress needs to extend or make permanent the successful rollover in order to keep these philanthropic gifts flowing and benefiting students," Warren added.
 
NAICU conducted the IRA rollover survey from January to March 2007, with 690 private non-for-profit institutions responding.
 
NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education.  With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions.  They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions. 

###
 
What Colleges Are Saying about the Charitable IRA Rollover
 
Carroll College
Helena, Montana
$101,000 in IRA rollover gifts (August 2006 - January 2007)

"There is great potential for additional gifts through the charitable rollover.  We have received numerous inquiries, several new donations, and additional pledges for this year.  I am convinced that with enough time to turn donor interest into action, we would further benefit." 

- Richard Ortega, vice president for advancement, Carroll College
 
Texas Christian University
Fort Worth, Texas
$229,835 in IRA rollover gifts (August 2006 - January 2007)

"TCU received $229,835 in new gifts as a result of IRA rollover.  The funds were directed to scholarships, capital projects, and more.  We consider the rollover to be a major incentive in our overall planned giving and fund raising program. And we expect that it will be even more productive for us in the future."
 
- Victor Boschini, chancellor, Texas Christian University
 
Wartburg College
Waverly, Iowa
$203,031 in IRA rollover gifts (August 2006 - January 2007)

"Educating donors and the college's advancement professionals was an important component in our initial marketing plan regarding the IRA rollover.  As our donors and staff become more familiar and comfortable with the process, we feel the potential for new gifts will continue to grow. Consequently, we encourage Congress to continue the rollover option, which will significantly impact students in positive ways."
 
- Jack Ohle, president, Wartburg College
 
 

April 12, 2007

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NAICU Membership Elects 2007-08 Board of Directors

NAICU Membership Elects 2007-08 Board of Directors

February 07, 2007

Cornell College President Leslie H. Garner, Jr., Named Chair

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 7—The membership of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities have selected 15 new board directors and four new board officers for 2007-08. NAICU is the leading national association representing private higher education, serving as the unified voice of nearly 1,000 independent college and university presidents, and specialized, state, and regional association executives. NAICU member institutions enroll nine of every 10 students attending a private college or university in the United States.

Members of NAICU’s board of director set the association’s agenda on federal higher education policy; actively encourage support of NAICU priorities and initiatives; and oversee the association’s financial administration. Members serve three-year terms.

“NAICU’s new board members and officers were selected by their peers because of their expertise in the field, proven leadership, and commitment to America’s college students,” said NAICU President David L. Warren. “They assume their responsibilities at a time of great challenge and transformation for American higher education.

“The federal budget deficit, growing student financial need, increasingly competitive global economy, and today’s culture of accountability are among the dynamics affecting higher education,” Warren said.

“Decisions made in Washington over the coming months and years will have significant consequences for whether students can afford to attend the institution of their choice, the ability of our institutions to maintain high academic standards, and the extent to which the federal government reaches into the management of our institutions and the privacy of our students,” Warren said. “Congress and the administration have the opportunity to make college more affordable, safeguard the American system of decentralized higher education, and work constructively with institutions to advance the nation’s economic strength, security, and science leadership. Our new board members and leaders will be critical to our efforts to make these goals a reality.”New NAICU Board Officers

Leslie H. Garner, Jr., president of Cornell College in Mount Vernon, IA, has been elected chair of the board of directors of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). His one-year term as chair of NAICU=s board was ratified February 6 by member college and university presidents at the 2007 NAICU Annual Meeting. Vice chair of the board in 2006-07, Garner succeeds David E. Shi, president of Furman University in Greenville, SC., who remains on the board as past chair.

Garner, who has led Cornell College since 1994, is the institution’s 14th president. He came to Cornell from North Carolina Wesleyan College in Rocky Mount, NC, where he served as president from 1987 to 1994. Before assuming the presidency, Garner held several positions at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He was a business administration professor, and directed the university’s Young Executives Institute, University Management Development Program, and Government Executives Institute. Garner sits on the boards of directors for numerous civic organizations in Cedar Rapids, IA. He earned his doctoral and master’s degrees in public policy from Harvard University, and his bachelor’s from the University of North Carolina.

Victor J. Boschini, Jr., chancellor of Texas Christian University in Forth Worth, TX, has beennamed vice chair of the board of directors. He will become chair in 2008-09. Boschini assumed  office as Texas Christian University’s 10th chancellor in 2003. Boschini came to TCU after serving as president of Illinois State University in Normal, IL, from 1999 to 2003. At Illinois State, Dr. Boschini held the positions of vice president for student affairs and associate professor of education. Earlier, he held administrative and teaching posts at Butler University and Indiana University. Boschini received his bachelor’s degree from Mount Union College, master’s in personnel from Bowling Green State University, and doctorate in higher education administration from Indiana University.



James T. Harris III
, president of Widener University in Chester, PA, has been named secretary. Harris became the ninth president of Widener University in 2002. Prior to Widener, Harris served eight years as president of Defiance College in Defiance, OH. Earlier, he held advancement and teaching positions at Wright State University, College of Mount Saint Joseph, and Pennsylvania State University. Harris has degrees from the University of Toledo, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, and Penn State.

Loren P. Gresham, president of Southern Nazarene University in Bethany, OK, has been named treasurer.

Eight new members were elected to three-year terms on the NAICU board representing the associations national regions:

Jonathan DeFelice, OSB, President, Saint Anselm College, Manchester, N.H.  Region I (Conn., Maine, Mass., N.H., R.I., Vt.)

Mary Eileen O’Brien, O.P., President, Dominican College, Orangeburg, N.Y. Region II (Del., D.C., Md., N.J., N.Y.)

Francis Marie Thrailkill
, O.P., President, College of Mount Saint Joseph, Cincinnati, Ohio Region III (Ky., Ohio, Pa., W.Va.)

Ruth A. Knox, President, Wesleyan College, Macon, Ga. Region IV ( Fla., Ga., N.C., S.C., Va.)

Stephan G. Jennings, President, University of Evansville, Evansville, Ind. Region V (Ill., Ind., Mich., Wis.)

Lanny Hall, President, Howard Payne University, Brownwood, Texas Region VI (Ala., Ark., La., Miss., Okla., Tenn. Texas)

Carl E. Zylstra, President, Dordt College, Sioux Center, Iowa Region VII (Iowa, Kan., Minn., Mo., Neb., N.D., S.D.)

Robert J. Spitzer, S.J., President, Gonzaga University, Spokane, Wash. Region VIII (Alaska, Ariz., Calif., Colo., Hawaii, Idaho, Mont., N.M., Nev., Ore., Utah,Wash., Wyo.)

Four presidents have been named to three-year terms as at-large members of the board:

John E. Bassett, President, Clark University, Worcester, Mass.

JoAnne Boyle, President, Seton Hill University, Greensburg, Pa..

Mark D. Gearan, President, Hobart & William Smith Colleges, Geneva, N.Y.

Elaine Tuttle Hansen, President, Bates College, Lewiston, Maine

One individual has been selected to serve a three-year term as a representative of the National Association of Independent College and University State Executives:

Abraham M. Lackman, President, Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities in New York, Albany, N.Y.

One individual has been selected to serve a three-year term as a representative of the NAICU Secretariat, an advisory board made up of the executives of specialized and regional independent college and university association:

Wanda Bigham, Assistant General Secretary, National Association of Schools and Colleges of the United Methodist Church, Nashville, Tenn.

One individual has been selected to serve a three-year term as a non-voting member of the board:

Chris Simmons, Associate Vice President for Federal Relations, Duke University, Durham, N.C.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. Since 1976, the association has represented private colleges and universities on policy issues with the federal government, such as those affecting student aid, taxation, and government regulation. With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, comprehensive universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

 

Cornell College President Leslie H. Garner, Jr., Named Chair

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 7—The membership of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities have selected 15 new board directors and four new board officers for 2007-08. NAICU is the leading national association representing private higher education, serving as the unified voice of nearly 1,000 independent college and university presidents, and specialized, state, and regional association executives. NAICU member institutions enroll nine of every 10 students attending a private college or university in the United States.

Members of NAICU’s board of director set the association’s agenda on federal higher education policy; actively encourage support of NAICU priorities and initiatives; and oversee the association’s financial administration. Members serve three-year terms.

“NAICU’s new board members and officers were selected by their peers because of their expertise in the field, proven leadership, and commitment to America’s college students,” said NAICU President David L. Warren. “They assume their responsibilities at a time of great challenge and transformation for American higher education.

“The federal budget deficit, growing student financial need, increasingly competitive global economy, and today’s culture of accountability are among the dynamics affecting higher education,” Warren said.

“Decisions made in Washington over the coming months and years will have significant consequences for whether students can afford to attend the institution of their choice, the ability of our institutions to maintain high academic standards, and the extent to which the federal government reaches into the management of our institutions and the privacy of our students,” Warren said. “Congress and the administration have the opportunity to make college more affordable, safeguard the American system of decentralized higher education, and work constructively with institutions to advance the nation’s economic strength, security, and science leadership. Our new board members and leaders will be critical to our efforts to make these goals a reality.”New NAICU Board Officers

Leslie H. Garner, Jr., president of Cornell College in Mount Vernon, IA, has been elected chair of the board of directors of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). His one-year term as chair of NAICU=s board was ratified February 6 by member college and university presidents at the 2007 NAICU Annual Meeting. Vice chair of the board in 2006-07, Garner succeeds David E. Shi, president of Furman University in Greenville, SC., who remains on the board as past chair.

Garner, who has led Cornell College since 1994, is the institution’s 14th president. He came to Cornell from North Carolina Wesleyan College in Rocky Mount, NC, where he served as president from 1987 to 1994. Before assuming the presidency, Garner held several positions at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He was a business administration professor, and directed the university’s Young Executives Institute, University Management Development Program, and Government Executives Institute. Garner sits on the boards of directors for numerous civic organizations in Cedar Rapids, IA. He earned his doctoral and master’s degrees in public policy from Harvard University, and his bachelor’s from the University of North Carolina.

Victor J. Boschini, Jr., chancellor of Texas Christian University in Forth Worth, TX, has beennamed vice chair of the board of directors. He will become chair in 2008-09. Boschini assumed  office as Texas Christian University’s 10th chancellor in 2003. Boschini came to TCU after serving as president of Illinois State University in Normal, IL, from 1999 to 2003. At Illinois State, Dr. Boschini held the positions of vice president for student affairs and associate professor of education. Earlier, he held administrative and teaching posts at Butler University and Indiana University. Boschini received his bachelor’s degree from Mount Union College, master’s in personnel from Bowling Green State University, and doctorate in higher education administration from Indiana University.



James T. Harris III
, president of Widener University in Chester, PA, has been named secretary. Harris became the ninth president of Widener University in 2002. Prior to Widener, Harris served eight years as president of Defiance College in Defiance, OH. Earlier, he held advancement and teaching positions at Wright State University, College of Mount Saint Joseph, and Pennsylvania State University. Harris has degrees from the University of Toledo, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, and Penn State.

Loren P. Gresham, president of Southern Nazarene University in Bethany, OK, has been named treasurer.

Eight new members were elected to three-year terms on the NAICU board representing the associations national regions:

Jonathan DeFelice, OSB, President, Saint Anselm College, Manchester, N.H.  Region I (Conn., Maine, Mass., N.H., R.I., Vt.)

Mary Eileen O’Brien, O.P., President, Dominican College, Orangeburg, N.Y. Region II (Del., D.C., Md., N.J., N.Y.)

Francis Marie Thrailkill
, O.P., President, College of Mount Saint Joseph, Cincinnati, Ohio Region III (Ky., Ohio, Pa., W.Va.)

Ruth A. Knox, President, Wesleyan College, Macon, Ga. Region IV ( Fla., Ga., N.C., S.C., Va.)

Stephan G. Jennings, President, University of Evansville, Evansville, Ind. Region V (Ill., Ind., Mich., Wis.)

Lanny Hall, President, Howard Payne University, Brownwood, Texas Region VI (Ala., Ark., La., Miss., Okla., Tenn. Texas)

Carl E. Zylstra, President, Dordt College, Sioux Center, Iowa Region VII (Iowa, Kan., Minn., Mo., Neb., N.D., S.D.)

Robert J. Spitzer, S.J., President, Gonzaga University, Spokane, Wash. Region VIII (Alaska, Ariz., Calif., Colo., Hawaii, Idaho, Mont., N.M., Nev., Ore., Utah,Wash., Wyo.)

Four presidents have been named to three-year terms as at-large members of the board:

John E. Bassett, President, Clark University, Worcester, Mass.

JoAnne Boyle, President, Seton Hill University, Greensburg, Pa..

Mark D. Gearan, President, Hobart & William Smith Colleges, Geneva, N.Y.

Elaine Tuttle Hansen, President, Bates College, Lewiston, Maine

One individual has been selected to serve a three-year term as a representative of the National Association of Independent College and University State Executives:

Abraham M. Lackman, President, Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities in New York, Albany, N.Y.

One individual has been selected to serve a three-year term as a representative of the NAICU Secretariat, an advisory board made up of the executives of specialized and regional independent college and university association:

Wanda Bigham, Assistant General Secretary, National Association of Schools and Colleges of the United Methodist Church, Nashville, Tenn.

One individual has been selected to serve a three-year term as a non-voting member of the board:

Chris Simmons, Associate Vice President for Federal Relations, Duke University, Durham, N.C.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. Since 1976, the association has represented private colleges and universities on policy issues with the federal government, such as those affecting student aid, taxation, and government regulation. With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, comprehensive universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

 

February 07, 2007

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NAICU News

Alexander “Sandy” Astin Selected to Receive 2007 Paley Award for Service to Independent Higher Education

Alexander “Sandy” Astin Selected to Receive 2007 Paley Award for Se...

February 05, 2007

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 5— Alexander “Sandy” Astin, founding director of the Higher Education Research Institute and professor of higher education emeritus at UCLA, has been selected by the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) to receive the 2007 Henry Paley Memorial Award.  He will receive the award from NAICU President David L. Warren at a luncheon that begins at 12:00 on Tuesday, Feb. 6, at the NAICU annual meeting.  The meeting will be held at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.
 
Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education.  The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States.  The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984.
 
One of the nation’s most prolific researchers in the field of higher education, Astin has authored 20 books and more than 300 other publications.  Through much of his career, Astin has been most identified with the longitudinal study of freshmen he founded at UCLA.  For more than 40 years, it has informed the nation’s understanding of the college experience and its outcomes. 
 
“Astin’s career has been an artful blend of exploration and exhortation in higher education,” said David Warren, president of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities.  “For decades, he has informed, inspired, and cajoled the field’s leaders as higher education has evolved.
 
“He has done it by never losing focus on what this enterprise is essentially about:  the students,” Warren said.  “In recognition of his continuing influence on our service to those we teach we are honored to present the 2007 Henry Paley Memorial Award to Sandy Astin.”
 
Astin was a moving force in attempts to truly understand and listen to students in the caldron of the unrest of the late 1960s.  He was writing about student-oriented change in higher education and the student drop-out problem in the 1970s.  He pressed for improved assessment and measurement of student outcomes in the 1980s and 90s.  In the new century, he has addressed the central role of colleges and universities in citizenship and civic engagement.  Most recently, his research has explored values and spirituality, revealing a largely hidden thirst for meaning, purpose, and values among students.
In 1997 he retired as director of UCLA’s Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP), based in the university’s Higher Education Research Institute (HERI).  However, he continues as principal investigator on two major HERI research projects.  One is a long-term longitudinal study of the impact of the undergraduate service learning experience on the post-college life of former college students.  The second, conducted with his wife Helen, is the continuing national study of students’ spiritual development.
 
In recognition of Astin’s productivity, insight, and influence, he has been elected to the National Academy of Education, named a fellow at the Stanford University’s Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, is the recipient of 11 honorary degrees, and has received awards for outstanding research and service from more than a dozen national associations and professional societies.
 
A survey by Change magazine in 1997 identified Astin as one of the nation’s higher education agenda setters, while a 1985 survey by Change cited him as the person most admired for creative, insightful thinking in the field of higher education.  A 1990 Journal of Higher Education survey found him to be the most frequently cited author in the field. 
 
NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education.  With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions.  They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions. 
 
WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 5— Alexander “Sandy” Astin, founding director of the Higher Education Research Institute and professor of higher education emeritus at UCLA, has been selected by the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) to receive the 2007 Henry Paley Memorial Award.  He will receive the award from NAICU President David L. Warren at a luncheon that begins at 12:00 on Tuesday, Feb. 6, at the NAICU annual meeting.  The meeting will be held at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.
 
Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education.  The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States.  The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984.
 
One of the nation’s most prolific researchers in the field of higher education, Astin has authored 20 books and more than 300 other publications.  Through much of his career, Astin has been most identified with the longitudinal study of freshmen he founded at UCLA.  For more than 40 years, it has informed the nation’s understanding of the college experience and its outcomes. 
 
“Astin’s career has been an artful blend of exploration and exhortation in higher education,” said David Warren, president of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities.  “For decades, he has informed, inspired, and cajoled the field’s leaders as higher education has evolved.
 
“He has done it by never losing focus on what this enterprise is essentially about:  the students,” Warren said.  “In recognition of his continuing influence on our service to those we teach we are honored to present the 2007 Henry Paley Memorial Award to Sandy Astin.”
 
Astin was a moving force in attempts to truly understand and listen to students in the caldron of the unrest of the late 1960s.  He was writing about student-oriented change in higher education and the student drop-out problem in the 1970s.  He pressed for improved assessment and measurement of student outcomes in the 1980s and 90s.  In the new century, he has addressed the central role of colleges and universities in citizenship and civic engagement.  Most recently, his research has explored values and spirituality, revealing a largely hidden thirst for meaning, purpose, and values among students.
In 1997 he retired as director of UCLA’s Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP), based in the university’s Higher Education Research Institute (HERI).  However, he continues as principal investigator on two major HERI research projects.  One is a long-term longitudinal study of the impact of the undergraduate service learning experience on the post-college life of former college students.  The second, conducted with his wife Helen, is the continuing national study of students’ spiritual development.
 
In recognition of Astin’s productivity, insight, and influence, he has been elected to the National Academy of Education, named a fellow at the Stanford University’s Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, is the recipient of 11 honorary degrees, and has received awards for outstanding research and service from more than a dozen national associations and professional societies.
 
A survey by Change magazine in 1997 identified Astin as one of the nation’s higher education agenda setters, while a 1985 survey by Change cited him as the person most admired for creative, insightful thinking in the field of higher education.  A 1990 Journal of Higher Education survey found him to be the most frequently cited author in the field. 
 
NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education.  With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions.  They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions. 
 

February 05, 2007

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Statement by NAICU President David L. Warren on the 2006 College Board Tuition and Student Aid Reports

Statement by NAICU President David L. Warren on the 2006 College Bo...

October 24, 2006

October 24, 2006

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About the items posted on the NAICU site: News items, features, and opinion pieces posted on this site from sources outside NAICU do not necessarily reflect the position of the association or its members. Rather, this content reflects the diversity of issues and views that are shaping American higher education.

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