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NAICU Membership Elects 2007-08 Board of Directors

NAICU Membership Elects 2007-08 Board of Directors

February 07, 2007

Cornell College President Leslie H. Garner, Jr., Named Chair

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 7—The membership of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities have selected 15 new board directors and four new board officers for 2007-08. NAICU is the leading national association representing private higher education, serving as the unified voice of nearly 1,000 independent college and university presidents, and specialized, state, and regional association executives. NAICU member institutions enroll nine of every 10 students attending a private college or university in the United States.

Members of NAICU’s board of director set the association’s agenda on federal higher education policy; actively encourage support of NAICU priorities and initiatives; and oversee the association’s financial administration. Members serve three-year terms.

“NAICU’s new board members and officers were selected by their peers because of their expertise in the field, proven leadership, and commitment to America’s college students,” said NAICU President David L. Warren. “They assume their responsibilities at a time of great challenge and transformation for American higher education.

“The federal budget deficit, growing student financial need, increasingly competitive global economy, and today’s culture of accountability are among the dynamics affecting higher education,” Warren said.

“Decisions made in Washington over the coming months and years will have significant consequences for whether students can afford to attend the institution of their choice, the ability of our institutions to maintain high academic standards, and the extent to which the federal government reaches into the management of our institutions and the privacy of our students,” Warren said. “Congress and the administration have the opportunity to make college more affordable, safeguard the American system of decentralized higher education, and work constructively with institutions to advance the nation’s economic strength, security, and science leadership. Our new board members and leaders will be critical to our efforts to make these goals a reality.”New NAICU Board Officers

Leslie H. Garner, Jr., president of Cornell College in Mount Vernon, IA, has been elected chair of the board of directors of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). His one-year term as chair of NAICU=s board was ratified February 6 by member college and university presidents at the 2007 NAICU Annual Meeting. Vice chair of the board in 2006-07, Garner succeeds David E. Shi, president of Furman University in Greenville, SC., who remains on the board as past chair.

Garner, who has led Cornell College since 1994, is the institution’s 14th president. He came to Cornell from North Carolina Wesleyan College in Rocky Mount, NC, where he served as president from 1987 to 1994. Before assuming the presidency, Garner held several positions at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He was a business administration professor, and directed the university’s Young Executives Institute, University Management Development Program, and Government Executives Institute. Garner sits on the boards of directors for numerous civic organizations in Cedar Rapids, IA. He earned his doctoral and master’s degrees in public policy from Harvard University, and his bachelor’s from the University of North Carolina.

Victor J. Boschini, Jr., chancellor of Texas Christian University in Forth Worth, TX, has beennamed vice chair of the board of directors. He will become chair in 2008-09. Boschini assumed  office as Texas Christian University’s 10th chancellor in 2003. Boschini came to TCU after serving as president of Illinois State University in Normal, IL, from 1999 to 2003. At Illinois State, Dr. Boschini held the positions of vice president for student affairs and associate professor of education. Earlier, he held administrative and teaching posts at Butler University and Indiana University. Boschini received his bachelor’s degree from Mount Union College, master’s in personnel from Bowling Green State University, and doctorate in higher education administration from Indiana University.



James T. Harris III
, president of Widener University in Chester, PA, has been named secretary. Harris became the ninth president of Widener University in 2002. Prior to Widener, Harris served eight years as president of Defiance College in Defiance, OH. Earlier, he held advancement and teaching positions at Wright State University, College of Mount Saint Joseph, and Pennsylvania State University. Harris has degrees from the University of Toledo, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, and Penn State.

Loren P. Gresham, president of Southern Nazarene University in Bethany, OK, has been named treasurer.

Eight new members were elected to three-year terms on the NAICU board representing the associations national regions:

Jonathan DeFelice, OSB, President, Saint Anselm College, Manchester, N.H.  Region I (Conn., Maine, Mass., N.H., R.I., Vt.)

Mary Eileen O’Brien, O.P., President, Dominican College, Orangeburg, N.Y. Region II (Del., D.C., Md., N.J., N.Y.)

Francis Marie Thrailkill
, O.P., President, College of Mount Saint Joseph, Cincinnati, Ohio Region III (Ky., Ohio, Pa., W.Va.)

Ruth A. Knox, President, Wesleyan College, Macon, Ga. Region IV ( Fla., Ga., N.C., S.C., Va.)

Stephan G. Jennings, President, University of Evansville, Evansville, Ind. Region V (Ill., Ind., Mich., Wis.)

Lanny Hall, President, Howard Payne University, Brownwood, Texas Region VI (Ala., Ark., La., Miss., Okla., Tenn. Texas)

Carl E. Zylstra, President, Dordt College, Sioux Center, Iowa Region VII (Iowa, Kan., Minn., Mo., Neb., N.D., S.D.)

Robert J. Spitzer, S.J., President, Gonzaga University, Spokane, Wash. Region VIII (Alaska, Ariz., Calif., Colo., Hawaii, Idaho, Mont., N.M., Nev., Ore., Utah,Wash., Wyo.)

Four presidents have been named to three-year terms as at-large members of the board:

John E. Bassett, President, Clark University, Worcester, Mass.

JoAnne Boyle, President, Seton Hill University, Greensburg, Pa..

Mark D. Gearan, President, Hobart & William Smith Colleges, Geneva, N.Y.

Elaine Tuttle Hansen, President, Bates College, Lewiston, Maine

One individual has been selected to serve a three-year term as a representative of the National Association of Independent College and University State Executives:

Abraham M. Lackman, President, Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities in New York, Albany, N.Y.

One individual has been selected to serve a three-year term as a representative of the NAICU Secretariat, an advisory board made up of the executives of specialized and regional independent college and university association:

Wanda Bigham, Assistant General Secretary, National Association of Schools and Colleges of the United Methodist Church, Nashville, Tenn.

One individual has been selected to serve a three-year term as a non-voting member of the board:

Chris Simmons, Associate Vice President for Federal Relations, Duke University, Durham, N.C.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. Since 1976, the association has represented private colleges and universities on policy issues with the federal government, such as those affecting student aid, taxation, and government regulation. With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, comprehensive universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

 

Cornell College President Leslie H. Garner, Jr., Named Chair

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 7—The membership of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities have selected 15 new board directors and four new board officers for 2007-08. NAICU is the leading national association representing private higher education, serving as the unified voice of nearly 1,000 independent college and university presidents, and specialized, state, and regional association executives. NAICU member institutions enroll nine of every 10 students attending a private college or university in the United States.

Members of NAICU’s board of director set the association’s agenda on federal higher education policy; actively encourage support of NAICU priorities and initiatives; and oversee the association’s financial administration. Members serve three-year terms.

“NAICU’s new board members and officers were selected by their peers because of their expertise in the field, proven leadership, and commitment to America’s college students,” said NAICU President David L. Warren. “They assume their responsibilities at a time of great challenge and transformation for American higher education.

“The federal budget deficit, growing student financial need, increasingly competitive global economy, and today’s culture of accountability are among the dynamics affecting higher education,” Warren said.

“Decisions made in Washington over the coming months and years will have significant consequences for whether students can afford to attend the institution of their choice, the ability of our institutions to maintain high academic standards, and the extent to which the federal government reaches into the management of our institutions and the privacy of our students,” Warren said. “Congress and the administration have the opportunity to make college more affordable, safeguard the American system of decentralized higher education, and work constructively with institutions to advance the nation’s economic strength, security, and science leadership. Our new board members and leaders will be critical to our efforts to make these goals a reality.”New NAICU Board Officers

Leslie H. Garner, Jr., president of Cornell College in Mount Vernon, IA, has been elected chair of the board of directors of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU). His one-year term as chair of NAICU=s board was ratified February 6 by member college and university presidents at the 2007 NAICU Annual Meeting. Vice chair of the board in 2006-07, Garner succeeds David E. Shi, president of Furman University in Greenville, SC., who remains on the board as past chair.

Garner, who has led Cornell College since 1994, is the institution’s 14th president. He came to Cornell from North Carolina Wesleyan College in Rocky Mount, NC, where he served as president from 1987 to 1994. Before assuming the presidency, Garner held several positions at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He was a business administration professor, and directed the university’s Young Executives Institute, University Management Development Program, and Government Executives Institute. Garner sits on the boards of directors for numerous civic organizations in Cedar Rapids, IA. He earned his doctoral and master’s degrees in public policy from Harvard University, and his bachelor’s from the University of North Carolina.

Victor J. Boschini, Jr., chancellor of Texas Christian University in Forth Worth, TX, has beennamed vice chair of the board of directors. He will become chair in 2008-09. Boschini assumed  office as Texas Christian University’s 10th chancellor in 2003. Boschini came to TCU after serving as president of Illinois State University in Normal, IL, from 1999 to 2003. At Illinois State, Dr. Boschini held the positions of vice president for student affairs and associate professor of education. Earlier, he held administrative and teaching posts at Butler University and Indiana University. Boschini received his bachelor’s degree from Mount Union College, master’s in personnel from Bowling Green State University, and doctorate in higher education administration from Indiana University.



James T. Harris III
, president of Widener University in Chester, PA, has been named secretary. Harris became the ninth president of Widener University in 2002. Prior to Widener, Harris served eight years as president of Defiance College in Defiance, OH. Earlier, he held advancement and teaching positions at Wright State University, College of Mount Saint Joseph, and Pennsylvania State University. Harris has degrees from the University of Toledo, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, and Penn State.

Loren P. Gresham, president of Southern Nazarene University in Bethany, OK, has been named treasurer.

Eight new members were elected to three-year terms on the NAICU board representing the associations national regions:

Jonathan DeFelice, OSB, President, Saint Anselm College, Manchester, N.H.  Region I (Conn., Maine, Mass., N.H., R.I., Vt.)

Mary Eileen O’Brien, O.P., President, Dominican College, Orangeburg, N.Y. Region II (Del., D.C., Md., N.J., N.Y.)

Francis Marie Thrailkill
, O.P., President, College of Mount Saint Joseph, Cincinnati, Ohio Region III (Ky., Ohio, Pa., W.Va.)

Ruth A. Knox, President, Wesleyan College, Macon, Ga. Region IV ( Fla., Ga., N.C., S.C., Va.)

Stephan G. Jennings, President, University of Evansville, Evansville, Ind. Region V (Ill., Ind., Mich., Wis.)

Lanny Hall, President, Howard Payne University, Brownwood, Texas Region VI (Ala., Ark., La., Miss., Okla., Tenn. Texas)

Carl E. Zylstra, President, Dordt College, Sioux Center, Iowa Region VII (Iowa, Kan., Minn., Mo., Neb., N.D., S.D.)

Robert J. Spitzer, S.J., President, Gonzaga University, Spokane, Wash. Region VIII (Alaska, Ariz., Calif., Colo., Hawaii, Idaho, Mont., N.M., Nev., Ore., Utah,Wash., Wyo.)

Four presidents have been named to three-year terms as at-large members of the board:

John E. Bassett, President, Clark University, Worcester, Mass.

JoAnne Boyle, President, Seton Hill University, Greensburg, Pa..

Mark D. Gearan, President, Hobart & William Smith Colleges, Geneva, N.Y.

Elaine Tuttle Hansen, President, Bates College, Lewiston, Maine

One individual has been selected to serve a three-year term as a representative of the National Association of Independent College and University State Executives:

Abraham M. Lackman, President, Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities in New York, Albany, N.Y.

One individual has been selected to serve a three-year term as a representative of the NAICU Secretariat, an advisory board made up of the executives of specialized and regional independent college and university association:

Wanda Bigham, Assistant General Secretary, National Association of Schools and Colleges of the United Methodist Church, Nashville, Tenn.

One individual has been selected to serve a three-year term as a non-voting member of the board:

Chris Simmons, Associate Vice President for Federal Relations, Duke University, Durham, N.C.

NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. Since 1976, the association has represented private colleges and universities on policy issues with the federal government, such as those affecting student aid, taxation, and government regulation. With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States. NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions. They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, comprehensive universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.

 

February 07, 2007

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NAICU News

Alexander “Sandy” Astin Selected to Receive 2007 Paley Award for Service to Independent Higher Education

Alexander “Sandy” Astin Selected to Receive 2007 Paley Award for Se...

February 05, 2007

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 5— Alexander “Sandy” Astin, founding director of the Higher Education Research Institute and professor of higher education emeritus at UCLA, has been selected by the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) to receive the 2007 Henry Paley Memorial Award.  He will receive the award from NAICU President David L. Warren at a luncheon that begins at 12:00 on Tuesday, Feb. 6, at the NAICU annual meeting.  The meeting will be held at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.
 
Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education.  The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States.  The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984.
 
One of the nation’s most prolific researchers in the field of higher education, Astin has authored 20 books and more than 300 other publications.  Through much of his career, Astin has been most identified with the longitudinal study of freshmen he founded at UCLA.  For more than 40 years, it has informed the nation’s understanding of the college experience and its outcomes. 
 
“Astin’s career has been an artful blend of exploration and exhortation in higher education,” said David Warren, president of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities.  “For decades, he has informed, inspired, and cajoled the field’s leaders as higher education has evolved.
 
“He has done it by never losing focus on what this enterprise is essentially about:  the students,” Warren said.  “In recognition of his continuing influence on our service to those we teach we are honored to present the 2007 Henry Paley Memorial Award to Sandy Astin.”
 
Astin was a moving force in attempts to truly understand and listen to students in the caldron of the unrest of the late 1960s.  He was writing about student-oriented change in higher education and the student drop-out problem in the 1970s.  He pressed for improved assessment and measurement of student outcomes in the 1980s and 90s.  In the new century, he has addressed the central role of colleges and universities in citizenship and civic engagement.  Most recently, his research has explored values and spirituality, revealing a largely hidden thirst for meaning, purpose, and values among students.
In 1997 he retired as director of UCLA’s Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP), based in the university’s Higher Education Research Institute (HERI).  However, he continues as principal investigator on two major HERI research projects.  One is a long-term longitudinal study of the impact of the undergraduate service learning experience on the post-college life of former college students.  The second, conducted with his wife Helen, is the continuing national study of students’ spiritual development.
 
In recognition of Astin’s productivity, insight, and influence, he has been elected to the National Academy of Education, named a fellow at the Stanford University’s Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, is the recipient of 11 honorary degrees, and has received awards for outstanding research and service from more than a dozen national associations and professional societies.
 
A survey by Change magazine in 1997 identified Astin as one of the nation’s higher education agenda setters, while a 1985 survey by Change cited him as the person most admired for creative, insightful thinking in the field of higher education.  A 1990 Journal of Higher Education survey found him to be the most frequently cited author in the field. 
 
NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education.  With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions.  They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions. 
 
WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 5— Alexander “Sandy” Astin, founding director of the Higher Education Research Institute and professor of higher education emeritus at UCLA, has been selected by the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) to receive the 2007 Henry Paley Memorial Award.  He will receive the award from NAICU President David L. Warren at a luncheon that begins at 12:00 on Tuesday, Feb. 6, at the NAICU annual meeting.  The meeting will be held at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.
 
Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education.  The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States.  The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984.
 
One of the nation’s most prolific researchers in the field of higher education, Astin has authored 20 books and more than 300 other publications.  Through much of his career, Astin has been most identified with the longitudinal study of freshmen he founded at UCLA.  For more than 40 years, it has informed the nation’s understanding of the college experience and its outcomes. 
 
“Astin’s career has been an artful blend of exploration and exhortation in higher education,” said David Warren, president of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities.  “For decades, he has informed, inspired, and cajoled the field’s leaders as higher education has evolved.
 
“He has done it by never losing focus on what this enterprise is essentially about:  the students,” Warren said.  “In recognition of his continuing influence on our service to those we teach we are honored to present the 2007 Henry Paley Memorial Award to Sandy Astin.”
 
Astin was a moving force in attempts to truly understand and listen to students in the caldron of the unrest of the late 1960s.  He was writing about student-oriented change in higher education and the student drop-out problem in the 1970s.  He pressed for improved assessment and measurement of student outcomes in the 1980s and 90s.  In the new century, he has addressed the central role of colleges and universities in citizenship and civic engagement.  Most recently, his research has explored values and spirituality, revealing a largely hidden thirst for meaning, purpose, and values among students.
In 1997 he retired as director of UCLA’s Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP), based in the university’s Higher Education Research Institute (HERI).  However, he continues as principal investigator on two major HERI research projects.  One is a long-term longitudinal study of the impact of the undergraduate service learning experience on the post-college life of former college students.  The second, conducted with his wife Helen, is the continuing national study of students’ spiritual development.
 
In recognition of Astin’s productivity, insight, and influence, he has been elected to the National Academy of Education, named a fellow at the Stanford University’s Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, is the recipient of 11 honorary degrees, and has received awards for outstanding research and service from more than a dozen national associations and professional societies.
 
A survey by Change magazine in 1997 identified Astin as one of the nation’s higher education agenda setters, while a 1985 survey by Change cited him as the person most admired for creative, insightful thinking in the field of higher education.  A 1990 Journal of Higher Education survey found him to be the most frequently cited author in the field. 
 
NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education.  With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions.  They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions. 
 

February 05, 2007

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Statement by NAICU President David L. Warren on the 2006 College Board Tuition and Student Aid Reports

Statement by NAICU President David L. Warren on the 2006 College Bo...

October 24, 2006

October 24, 2006

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Backgrounder: Facts about Private College and University Affordability and Accessibility

Backgrounder: Facts about Private College and University Affordabil...

October 24, 2006

Facts about Private College and UniversityAffordability and Accessibility

Background for the 2006 College BoardTuition and Student Aid Reports

…………………………………………………………………………………………… 

Trends in Private College Tuition and Fees 

The College Board reports that tuition at private colleges and universities rose by 5.9 percent for2006-07. The inflation-adjusted increase in published tuition and fees at four-year private institutions between 2001-02 and 2006-07 is 11 percent lower than any other five-year increase since 1981. 

The Value of Financial Aid at Private Colleges and Universities 

The College Board also reports that the amount of student aid available grew 8 percent. While theaverage list price for tuition and fees at our institutions this year is $22,218, the average net tuition (published price minus grants and tax benefits) is $13,200--more than 40 percent below the average published tuition. 

Recent statistics from the Department of Education bear out the importance of student aid in keeping private higher education affordable to students from all backgrounds. Eighty-six percent of dependent, full-time undergraduates receive some form of aid. The average annual aid package is $15,900. Seventy-nine percent of these students receive grant aid worth an average of $9,400 a year.  

As a result, students at private institutions are as likely to come from low-income and working families, or racial or ethnic minorities, as students at public four-year universities. Students at private colleges and universities still graduate with a surprisingly similar amount in federal loans as their peers at public institutions. 

Students’ Return on Investment

Seventy-nine percent of students who earn a bachelor’s degree from a private college or university are able to do so in four years or less, compared with 49 percent of graduates at state institutions. 

Students at private institutions are also more likely to be involved on campus and in their communities, and to rate their college experience higher than their state college counterparts. 

Eighty-nine percent of private college graduates report their financial investment was worth it. Nearly 9 in 10 private college seniors say their education strengthened and expanded their writing, interpersonal, and problem-solving skills; critical thinking ability; and expertise in a particular field. 

Cost Drivers at Private Institutions 

This year’s average increase of 5.9 percent reflects extraordinary increases in several cost drivers.Two major revenue streams--endowments and philanthropic giving--continue to make up groundslowly after several years of lost revenue.

  • From 1994-95 to 2004-05, grant aid provided by private colleges increased 150 percent, more than twice the rate of tuition (71 percent).
 
  • Since 2005, the price of utilities has risen 27 percent, according to the Commonfund Institute. This is almost triple the average annual increase over the last four years.
 
  • The median increase for health care costs at colleges was 9 percent in 2005-06, according to the College and University Personnel Association.
 
  • In recent years, annual premiums for many types of insurance, including general liability,property, and worker’s compensation, have commonly increased by double-digit rates. Experts expect property insurance to increase between 10 to 50 percent in 2006, according to the Chronicle of Higher Education.

 

  • Periodicals and other library materials routinely increase by double-digit rates each year. The Association of Research Libraries reports that between 1986 and 2004, research library expenditures for scholarly journals increased 273 percent.
 
  • The cost of keeping up with innovations in information technology at private colleges anduniversities increased 26 percent in 2005-06, according to Market Data Retrieval. 

 

  • The National Association of College and University Business Officers reports that the average college endowment earned 9.3 percent in 2005. However, when inflation and endowment spending rates are taken into account, the five-year average return of 3.3 percent translates into a decline in endowment earning potential over that time.
 
  • According to the Council for Aid to Education, philanthropic giving to institutions increased by 4.9 percent between 2003-04 and 2004-05. Adjusted for inflation, the increase is 1.6 percent. Corporate giving did not increase and gifts from individuals other than alumni declined.

 Cuts in Federal Student Aid as a Cost Driver 

Congress has not kept funding for student aid in line with inflation, growing family need, or the wave of low-income and first-generation college students who are academically prepared for college. The erosion of federal student aid in the past five years has become an additional strain on college budgets as institutions attempt to fill the gap. Students at private colleges today receive nearly five times as much grant aid from their institutions as from the federal government. 

The maximum Pell Grant hasn’t increased in five years. The constant dollar value of the average Pell Grant declined for the second consecutive year in 2004-05. Because of flat Pell funding and cuts in the federal campus-based aid programs, grant and work-study packages for students have shrunk. This is not the way to make higher education affordable for America’s working families. It is also putting the public good provided by higher education at risk. 

We support the call by the Secretary of Education’s Commission on the Future of Higher Education to increase the maximum Pell Grant to 70 percent of the average cost of in-state tuition at a four-year public university, from the current 33 percent. Such a move by Congress would have the long-term benefits of the G.I. Bill, positioning the nation to safeguard its role as a global economic, scientific, political, and security leader. Private colleges and universities remain dedicated to controlling costs, increasing accessibility, and maintaining quality. Congress needs to keep up its commitment to needy students, their future, and the future of the national interest. 

Institutional Efforts to Enhance Affordability and Control Costs 

All colleges—and their students—face financial pressures. Private institutions are addressing them by implementing innovative affordability and cost-cutting initiatives. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to cost control and affordability, because of differences in mission, student population, and fiscal resources. Private colleges are employing a variety of strategies.

  • A small but growing number of private colleges and universities are reducing their sticker prices for tuition and fees.
 
  • Others have locked in the tuition rate for a student’s four- or five-year enrollment. This means that tuition remains the same each year for a student.
 
  • Several are tapping endowment funds to assist low income students: covering tuition, room, and board; eliminating loans; lowering parental contributions; and matching Pell Grants.
 
  • Others offer three-year bachelor’s degree programs, or four-year graduation and employment guarantees.
 
  • • While funds from state tuition savings plans can be used at private colleges throughout the nation many institutions have gone further to develop tuition prepayment plans for future students.

 To control operating expenses, more institutions are: 

  • Entering into consortial arrangements to reduce administrative and academic redundancies, and leverage their purchasing power to obtain lower costs for energy, insurance, information technology, and other services;
 
  • Outsourcing campus services, such as grounds and facilities maintenance, alumni relations operations, residence hall management, billing and other “back office” functions, and bookstores; and
 
  • Turning to environmentally friendly systems to lower energy consumption; streamlining staff; and consolidating offices and programs to enhance efficiency.

 Examples of affordability, cost-saving, and consortial initiatives are posted on the NAICU Web site at www.naicu.edu/news/campusinnovations.asp

###

Facts about Private College and UniversityAffordability and Accessibility

Background for the 2006 College BoardTuition and Student Aid Reports

…………………………………………………………………………………………… 

Trends in Private College Tuition and Fees 

The College Board reports that tuition at private colleges and universities rose by 5.9 percent for2006-07. The inflation-adjusted increase in published tuition and fees at four-year private institutions between 2001-02 and 2006-07 is 11 percent lower than any other five-year increase since 1981. 

The Value of Financial Aid at Private Colleges and Universities 

The College Board also reports that the amount of student aid available grew 8 percent. While theaverage list price for tuition and fees at our institutions this year is $22,218, the average net tuition (published price minus grants and tax benefits) is $13,200--more than 40 percent below the average published tuition. 

Recent statistics from the Department of Education bear out the importance of student aid in keeping private higher education affordable to students from all backgrounds. Eighty-six percent of dependent, full-time undergraduates receive some form of aid. The average annual aid package is $15,900. Seventy-nine percent of these students receive grant aid worth an average of $9,400 a year.  

As a result, students at private institutions are as likely to come from low-income and working families, or racial or ethnic minorities, as students at public four-year universities. Students at private colleges and universities still graduate with a surprisingly similar amount in federal loans as their peers at public institutions. 

Students’ Return on Investment

Seventy-nine percent of students who earn a bachelor’s degree from a private college or university are able to do so in four years or less, compared with 49 percent of graduates at state institutions. 

Students at private institutions are also more likely to be involved on campus and in their communities, and to rate their college experience higher than their state college counterparts. 

Eighty-nine percent of private college graduates report their financial investment was worth it. Nearly 9 in 10 private college seniors say their education strengthened and expanded their writing, interpersonal, and problem-solving skills; critical thinking ability; and expertise in a particular field. 

Cost Drivers at Private Institutions 

This year’s average increase of 5.9 percent reflects extraordinary increases in several cost drivers.Two major revenue streams--endowments and philanthropic giving--continue to make up groundslowly after several years of lost revenue.

  • From 1994-95 to 2004-05, grant aid provided by private colleges increased 150 percent, more than twice the rate of tuition (71 percent).
 
  • Since 2005, the price of utilities has risen 27 percent, according to the Commonfund Institute. This is almost triple the average annual increase over the last four years.
 
  • The median increase for health care costs at colleges was 9 percent in 2005-06, according to the College and University Personnel Association.
 
  • In recent years, annual premiums for many types of insurance, including general liability,property, and worker’s compensation, have commonly increased by double-digit rates. Experts expect property insurance to increase between 10 to 50 percent in 2006, according to the Chronicle of Higher Education.

 

  • Periodicals and other library materials routinely increase by double-digit rates each year. The Association of Research Libraries reports that between 1986 and 2004, research library expenditures for scholarly journals increased 273 percent.
 
  • The cost of keeping up with innovations in information technology at private colleges anduniversities increased 26 percent in 2005-06, according to Market Data Retrieval. 

 

  • The National Association of College and University Business Officers reports that the average college endowment earned 9.3 percent in 2005. However, when inflation and endowment spending rates are taken into account, the five-year average return of 3.3 percent translates into a decline in endowment earning potential over that time.
 
  • According to the Council for Aid to Education, philanthropic giving to institutions increased by 4.9 percent between 2003-04 and 2004-05. Adjusted for inflation, the increase is 1.6 percent. Corporate giving did not increase and gifts from individuals other than alumni declined.

 Cuts in Federal Student Aid as a Cost Driver 

Congress has not kept funding for student aid in line with inflation, growing family need, or the wave of low-income and first-generation college students who are academically prepared for college. The erosion of federal student aid in the past five years has become an additional strain on college budgets as institutions attempt to fill the gap. Students at private colleges today receive nearly five times as much grant aid from their institutions as from the federal government. 

The maximum Pell Grant hasn’t increased in five years. The constant dollar value of the average Pell Grant declined for the second consecutive year in 2004-05. Because of flat Pell funding and cuts in the federal campus-based aid programs, grant and work-study packages for students have shrunk. This is not the way to make higher education affordable for America’s working families. It is also putting the public good provided by higher education at risk. 

We support the call by the Secretary of Education’s Commission on the Future of Higher Education to increase the maximum Pell Grant to 70 percent of the average cost of in-state tuition at a four-year public university, from the current 33 percent. Such a move by Congress would have the long-term benefits of the G.I. Bill, positioning the nation to safeguard its role as a global economic, scientific, political, and security leader. Private colleges and universities remain dedicated to controlling costs, increasing accessibility, and maintaining quality. Congress needs to keep up its commitment to needy students, their future, and the future of the national interest. 

Institutional Efforts to Enhance Affordability and Control Costs 

All colleges—and their students—face financial pressures. Private institutions are addressing them by implementing innovative affordability and cost-cutting initiatives. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to cost control and affordability, because of differences in mission, student population, and fiscal resources. Private colleges are employing a variety of strategies.

  • A small but growing number of private colleges and universities are reducing their sticker prices for tuition and fees.
 
  • Others have locked in the tuition rate for a student’s four- or five-year enrollment. This means that tuition remains the same each year for a student.
 
  • Several are tapping endowment funds to assist low income students: covering tuition, room, and board; eliminating loans; lowering parental contributions; and matching Pell Grants.
 
  • Others offer three-year bachelor’s degree programs, or four-year graduation and employment guarantees.
 
  • • While funds from state tuition savings plans can be used at private colleges throughout the nation many institutions have gone further to develop tuition prepayment plans for future students.

 To control operating expenses, more institutions are: 

  • Entering into consortial arrangements to reduce administrative and academic redundancies, and leverage their purchasing power to obtain lower costs for energy, insurance, information technology, and other services;
 
  • Outsourcing campus services, such as grounds and facilities maintenance, alumni relations operations, residence hall management, billing and other “back office” functions, and bookstores; and
 
  • Turning to environmentally friendly systems to lower energy consumption; streamlining staff; and consolidating offices and programs to enhance efficiency.

 Examples of affordability, cost-saving, and consortial initiatives are posted on the NAICU Web site at www.naicu.edu/news/campusinnovations.asp

###

October 24, 2006

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Statement by NAICU President David L. Warren on U.S. Education Secretary Margaret Spellings' Speech on the Recommendations of the Commission on the Future of Higher Education

Statement by NAICU President David L. Warren on U.S. Education Secr...

September 26, 2006

We hope Secretary Spellings' important speech marks a step toward engaging the higher education community as full participants in addressing the challenges facing our colleges and universities. NAICU looks forward to working productively with the Education Department in the coming months. We will also be proactively addressing the issues raised by the commission through the higher education community's comprehensive "Next Steps" initiative.

We support many of the commission's recommendations, some of which were cited in the secretary's speech. These include the commission's emphasis on increasing access; the recognition of the vital role of higher education in contributing both to the public good and to individual enhancement; the need for accountability (although we would add the word "appropriate"), the importance of additional resources in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM); the call for deregulation of higher education at the federal and state level; the importance of producing globally literate graduates; and the need to address policies relating to the admission of foreign students at U.S. institutions.

Conspicuous by its absence, however, was an endorsement of the commission's specific call for a substantial increase in the maximum Pell Grant – the key form of federal student financial aid for the neediest students. In her prepared remarks, Spellings made a reference to need-based aid, but only mentioned a generic commitment to Pell Grants in response to an audience question.

Also in her speech, the secretary called for reform of the entire financial aid system, which by every implication means the elimination of some student aid programs, resulting in a net loss of aid for the nation’s neediest students. Federal efforts might better be directed toward supporting the proven federal aid programs already in place, not finding ways to dismantle the current array of financial aid programs that have worked amazingly well.

Secretary Spellings, in her third action item, also called for collecting student-level data to create a higher education information system that would provide consumer information to every student. However we are not clear as to why, to accomplish that goal, the system must include information on every student.

Data already collected by the federal government has yielded many high-quality, statistically valid studies that give us illuminating insights into the process – and the shortcomings – as we move students through their higher education experience. We concur that the Department of Education's existing COOL Web site has the potential to be a powerful tool for college choice, and NAICU has had a longstanding proposal in place to work with the department in expanding that resource.

NAICU and its member institutions share a fundamental belief that student and family privacy must be protected, as it has been for more than 30 years under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Guarantees made by Secretary Spellings that individual student information would be fully protected is at odds with the reality of federal databases, which have experienced numerous widely-publicized breaches in recent months. Such a national system for tracking students from high school through college and into the workplace, in order to measure institutional performance, would shift the control of those records from the student to the federal government.

We hope Secretary Spellings' important speech marks a step toward engaging the higher education community as full participants in addressing the challenges facing our colleges and universities. NAICU looks forward to working productively with the Education Department in the coming months. We will also be proactively addressing the issues raised by the commission through the higher education community's comprehensive "Next Steps" initiative.

We support many of the commission's recommendations, some of which were cited in the secretary's speech. These include the commission's emphasis on increasing access; the recognition of the vital role of higher education in contributing both to the public good and to individual enhancement; the need for accountability (although we would add the word "appropriate"), the importance of additional resources in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM); the call for deregulation of higher education at the federal and state level; the importance of producing globally literate graduates; and the need to address policies relating to the admission of foreign students at U.S. institutions.

Conspicuous by its absence, however, was an endorsement of the commission's specific call for a substantial increase in the maximum Pell Grant – the key form of federal student financial aid for the neediest students. In her prepared remarks, Spellings made a reference to need-based aid, but only mentioned a generic commitment to Pell Grants in response to an audience question.

Also in her speech, the secretary called for reform of the entire financial aid system, which by every implication means the elimination of some student aid programs, resulting in a net loss of aid for the nation’s neediest students. Federal efforts might better be directed toward supporting the proven federal aid programs already in place, not finding ways to dismantle the current array of financial aid programs that have worked amazingly well.

Secretary Spellings, in her third action item, also called for collecting student-level data to create a higher education information system that would provide consumer information to every student. However we are not clear as to why, to accomplish that goal, the system must include information on every student.

Data already collected by the federal government has yielded many high-quality, statistically valid studies that give us illuminating insights into the process – and the shortcomings – as we move students through their higher education experience. We concur that the Department of Education's existing COOL Web site has the potential to be a powerful tool for college choice, and NAICU has had a longstanding proposal in place to work with the department in expanding that resource.

NAICU and its member institutions share a fundamental belief that student and family privacy must be protected, as it has been for more than 30 years under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Guarantees made by Secretary Spellings that individual student information would be fully protected is at odds with the reality of federal databases, which have experienced numerous widely-publicized breaches in recent months. Such a national system for tracking students from high school through college and into the workplace, in order to measure institutional performance, would shift the control of those records from the student to the federal government.

September 26, 2006

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About the items posted on the NAICU site: News items, features, and opinion pieces posted on this site from sources outside NAICU do not necessarily reflect the position of the association or its members. Rather, this content reflects the diversity of issues and views that are shaping American higher education.

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