News from NAICU

  • refine by:
X

Statement by NAICU President David L. Warren on the Higher Education Act Bill Passed Today by the House of Representatives

Statement by NAICU President David L. Warren on the Higher Educatio...

March 30, 2006

(By a vote of 221 to 199, the House of Representatives today passed the Higher Education Act (HEA), H.R. 609. The bill moves on to the Senate.)

We appreciate the willingness of Chairman Buck McKeon and his colleagues on both sides of the aisle to listen to the concerns of America’s private colleges and universities. The bill passed by the House today is a marked improvement over the one that came out of committee.

While the bill is not perfect, the progress made has opened the way for us to work together with Mr. McKeon and his Democratic counterpart Rep. Miller to seek further improvements in the legislation.

While flaws remain, significant improvements were made to the bill over the past week. The Republican Leadership agreed to support two amendments that (1) addressed our major policy problems with transfer of credit; (2) fully struck the states as accreditors language; and (3) removed the most egregious, but not all, enforcement mechanisms for federal price controls, although aspects of the reporting requirements that are troublesome still remain.

Although we do not endorse the bill, those improvements allowed NAICU to remove its vigorous opposition to the bill on the House floor.

In the past week, independent colleges around the nation voiced a number of concerns about the House bill. Principal among our concerns were provisions we believe establish inappropriate federal control over a private college's responsibility to set its own prices, and those that would allow states to become accreditors.

America's private colleges play an essential role in ensuring the diversity of choice that is the strength of American higher education. We look forward to working with Republicans and Democrats to safeguard the diversity and quality of private higher education, by ensuring appropriate accountability to federal taxpayers without imposing inappropriate federal or state control.

(By a vote of 221 to 199, the House of Representatives today passed the Higher Education Act (HEA), H.R. 609. The bill moves on to the Senate.)

We appreciate the willingness of Chairman Buck McKeon and his colleagues on both sides of the aisle to listen to the concerns of America’s private colleges and universities. The bill passed by the House today is a marked improvement over the one that came out of committee.

While the bill is not perfect, the progress made has opened the way for us to work together with Mr. McKeon and his Democratic counterpart Rep. Miller to seek further improvements in the legislation.

While flaws remain, significant improvements were made to the bill over the past week. The Republican Leadership agreed to support two amendments that (1) addressed our major policy problems with transfer of credit; (2) fully struck the states as accreditors language; and (3) removed the most egregious, but not all, enforcement mechanisms for federal price controls, although aspects of the reporting requirements that are troublesome still remain.

Although we do not endorse the bill, those improvements allowed NAICU to remove its vigorous opposition to the bill on the House floor.

In the past week, independent colleges around the nation voiced a number of concerns about the House bill. Principal among our concerns were provisions we believe establish inappropriate federal control over a private college's responsibility to set its own prices, and those that would allow states to become accreditors.

America's private colleges play an essential role in ensuring the diversity of choice that is the strength of American higher education. We look forward to working with Republicans and Democrats to safeguard the diversity and quality of private higher education, by ensuring appropriate accountability to federal taxpayers without imposing inappropriate federal or state control.

March 30, 2006

show article

read full article


X

NAICU News

Clare Cotton Selected to Receive 2006 Paley Award for Service to Private Higher Education

Clare Cotton Selected to Receive 2006 Paley Award for Service to Pr...

February 07, 2006

WASHINGTON, D.C., — Clare Cotton, retired president of the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Massachusetts (AICUM), has been selected by the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) to receive the 2006 Henry Paley Memorial Award.  He will receive the award from NAICU President David L. Warren on Tuesday, Feb. 7, at the NAICU Annual Meeting.  The meeting will be held at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill. 

Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education.  The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States.  The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984. 

“Clare Cotton is that increasingly rare figure in American higher education – a person who can take us out of arcane policy conversation to remind us of the larger truths at hand,” said NAICU President David L. Warren. “He does it in his signature style of humor and grace, with a large dose of wisdom.” 

For 17 years, Cotton served as president of AICUM.  In his second year in office, the state’s Gilbert Grants for independent students were targeted to be eliminated. Under Cotton’s leadership, the program was not only saved, but has grown into a major program with annual funding levels in the tens of millions of dollars. 

During the past decade, Cotton has risen to national prominence as an articulate voice for what American higher education is and should be. Congress – both mystified and angry about college cost – established the National Commission on the Cost of Higher Education in 1997. Cotton was one of 11 appointees to this distinguished panel, where he immediately established himself as one of its leading figures. “His ability to understand and then explain complex matters of higher education economics added enormously to public understanding of this difficult policy issue,” Warren said.

 

With the recommendation of Sen. Edward Kennedy, in 2002 the Senate again tapped Cotton to serve on the Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance, created in 1986 to advise Congress on national higher education and student aid policy. Cotton was appointed committee chair in 2003. During his tenure, the committee has put forward innovative proposals in such diverse areas as streamlining the student aid application process, identifying future federal student aid eligibility for low-income students, and improving coordination of state, federal, and private student aid funds.  

Cotton also has served as a leading national voice for private higher education in his roles as chair of the National Association of Independent College and University State Executives (NAICUSE) and a member of the NAICU board of directors. In addition, he has served as a national negotiator for private colleges at numerous negotiated rulemaking sessions conducted by the U.S. Department of Education.  

“In recognition of his artful engagement with the thorniest of higher education issues over the years, his lucid insights into state and national policy and politics, and his extraordinary service to private higher education throughout his career, we are honored to present the 2006 Henry Paley Memorial Award to Clare Cotton,” said Warren. NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. 

With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions.  They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.    

### 

WASHINGTON, D.C., — Clare Cotton, retired president of the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Massachusetts (AICUM), has been selected by the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) to receive the 2006 Henry Paley Memorial Award.  He will receive the award from NAICU President David L. Warren on Tuesday, Feb. 7, at the NAICU Annual Meeting.  The meeting will be held at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill. 

Since 1985, the Paley Award has recognized an individual who, throughout his or her career, has unfailingly served the students and faculty of independent higher education.  The recipient of this award has set an example for all who would seek to advance educational opportunity in the United States.  The Paley Award is named for Henry Paley, president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities of New York from 1975 until 1984. 

“Clare Cotton is that increasingly rare figure in American higher education – a person who can take us out of arcane policy conversation to remind us of the larger truths at hand,” said NAICU President David L. Warren. “He does it in his signature style of humor and grace, with a large dose of wisdom.” 

For 17 years, Cotton served as president of AICUM.  In his second year in office, the state’s Gilbert Grants for independent students were targeted to be eliminated. Under Cotton’s leadership, the program was not only saved, but has grown into a major program with annual funding levels in the tens of millions of dollars. 

During the past decade, Cotton has risen to national prominence as an articulate voice for what American higher education is and should be. Congress – both mystified and angry about college cost – established the National Commission on the Cost of Higher Education in 1997. Cotton was one of 11 appointees to this distinguished panel, where he immediately established himself as one of its leading figures. “His ability to understand and then explain complex matters of higher education economics added enormously to public understanding of this difficult policy issue,” Warren said.

 

With the recommendation of Sen. Edward Kennedy, in 2002 the Senate again tapped Cotton to serve on the Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance, created in 1986 to advise Congress on national higher education and student aid policy. Cotton was appointed committee chair in 2003. During his tenure, the committee has put forward innovative proposals in such diverse areas as streamlining the student aid application process, identifying future federal student aid eligibility for low-income students, and improving coordination of state, federal, and private student aid funds.  

Cotton also has served as a leading national voice for private higher education in his roles as chair of the National Association of Independent College and University State Executives (NAICUSE) and a member of the NAICU board of directors. In addition, he has served as a national negotiator for private colleges at numerous negotiated rulemaking sessions conducted by the U.S. Department of Education.  

“In recognition of his artful engagement with the thorniest of higher education issues over the years, his lucid insights into state and national policy and politics, and his extraordinary service to private higher education throughout his career, we are honored to present the 2006 Henry Paley Memorial Award to Clare Cotton,” said Warren. NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. 

With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions.  They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.    

### 

February 07, 2006

show article

read full article


X

Rep. Phil English to Receive 2006 NAICU Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education

Rep. Phil English to Receive 2006 NAICU Award for Advocacy of Indep...

February 03, 2006

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                       

CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu

office: 202-739-0474     cell: 202-288-9333 

Rep. Phil English to Receive 2006 NAICU Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education 

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 3—Rep. Phil English (R-Pa.) has been selected by the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) to receive its 2005 Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education.  The award will be presented at 12:30 p.m. on Tuesday, February 7, at the NAICU annual meeting.  The meeting will be held at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill. 

The NAICU Advocacy Award was established in 1993 to recognize individuals outside of academe who have championed the cause of independent nonprofit higher education. Whether in government, business, or philanthropy, the winner of this award has provided leadership, established resources, or enacted policy at the state or national level that recognized the role of independent colleges and universities in serving public purposes.  No single contribution makes one eligible to receive the award.  Instead, it recognizes a lifetime of service, initiative, and determination. 

Since being elected to the House of Representatives in 1994, Rep. Phil English has been one of the strongest supporters of independent higher education in Congress.  One of the first bills he introduced after taking office was legislation to make college savings plans tax-free.  Over the course of his 10 years in office, he has continued to support tax incentives to increase access to college, provide relief to students and families, and reduce burdens after graduation. 

English and his staff have worked directly with the colleges in and around his congressional district for years, as well as working with NAICU on key issues important to our institutions.  Early last year he introduced the Higher Education Availability and Affordability Act, which would:  

  • Expand the student loan interest deduction
  • Increase allowable contributions to all types of education savings plans
  • Allow scholarships and grants to be used for room and board expenses without tax penalties
  • Expand allowable expenses under the Hope tax credit
  • Make permanent all of the higher education incentives currently set to expire in 2011
  • Permanently expand the tuition deduction for higher education expenses 

“Rep. English's steady and determined work has made college more affordable to millions of families across the nation,” said NAICU President David L. Warrren.  “America’s students, families, and colleges and universities are fortunate to have a champion like him on Capitol Hill.  We are honored to recognize his leadership and commitment to independent higher education.” NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. 

With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions.  They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.    

###

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                       

CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu

office: 202-739-0474     cell: 202-288-9333 

Rep. Phil English to Receive 2006 NAICU Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education 

WASHINGTON, D.C., Feb. 3—Rep. Phil English (R-Pa.) has been selected by the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) to receive its 2005 Award for Advocacy of Independent Higher Education.  The award will be presented at 12:30 p.m. on Tuesday, February 7, at the NAICU annual meeting.  The meeting will be held at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill. 

The NAICU Advocacy Award was established in 1993 to recognize individuals outside of academe who have championed the cause of independent nonprofit higher education. Whether in government, business, or philanthropy, the winner of this award has provided leadership, established resources, or enacted policy at the state or national level that recognized the role of independent colleges and universities in serving public purposes.  No single contribution makes one eligible to receive the award.  Instead, it recognizes a lifetime of service, initiative, and determination. 

Since being elected to the House of Representatives in 1994, Rep. Phil English has been one of the strongest supporters of independent higher education in Congress.  One of the first bills he introduced after taking office was legislation to make college savings plans tax-free.  Over the course of his 10 years in office, he has continued to support tax incentives to increase access to college, provide relief to students and families, and reduce burdens after graduation. 

English and his staff have worked directly with the colleges in and around his congressional district for years, as well as working with NAICU on key issues important to our institutions.  Early last year he introduced the Higher Education Availability and Affordability Act, which would:  

  • Expand the student loan interest deduction
  • Increase allowable contributions to all types of education savings plans
  • Allow scholarships and grants to be used for room and board expenses without tax penalties
  • Expand allowable expenses under the Hope tax credit
  • Make permanent all of the higher education incentives currently set to expire in 2011
  • Permanently expand the tuition deduction for higher education expenses 

“Rep. English's steady and determined work has made college more affordable to millions of families across the nation,” said NAICU President David L. Warrren.  “America’s students, families, and colleges and universities are fortunate to have a champion like him on Capitol Hill.  We are honored to recognize his leadership and commitment to independent higher education.” NAICU serves as the unified national voice of independent higher education. 

With nearly 1,000 member institutions and associations nationwide, NAICU reflects the diversity of private, nonprofit higher education in the United States.  NAICU members enroll 85 percent of all students attending private institutions.  They include traditional liberal arts colleges, major research universities, church- and faith-related institutions, historically black colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, single-sex colleges, art institutions, two-year colleges, and schools of law, medicine, engineering, business, and other professions.    

###

 

February 03, 2006

show article

read full article


X

Senators Clinton and Santorum to Address 2006 NAICU Annual Meeting

Senators Clinton and Santorum to Address 2006 NAICU Annual Meeting

January 17, 2006

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                

CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu                                                        

office: 202-739-0474     cell: 202-288-9333 

Media Advisory 

Senators Clinton and Santorum to Address 2006 NAICU Annual Meeting

Gathering of More than 400 Private College Leaders to Examine Emerging Trends and Key Issues in Higher Education  

WHAT: 2006 NAICU Annual Meeting “Transition and Tradition”

Private college and university presidents and other members of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities will meet with policymakers, leading higher education researchers and experts, and political pundits to address the future of higher education and challenges facing institutions and students today.   

WHERE:

Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill

400 New Jersey Avenue, NW Washington, D.C. 202-737-1234  

WHEN: February 5-8, 2006  
 

Issues include:

Spirituality on campus ● The Secretary of Education’s Commission on Higher Education ● Trends in the college selection process ● The international role of American colleges and universities ● Higher education tax policy ● Recruiting and marketing trends 

Speakers include:

Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) ● Sen. Rick Santorum (R-Pa.) ● Rep. Phil English (R-Pa.) ● New York Times Columnist David Brooks ● Newsweek Contributor Eleanor Clift ● Student Attitudes Researcher Alexander “Sandy” Astin ● Futurist Eric Peterson  

Schedule of events:

Available at http://www.naicu.edu/meetings/2006AnnMtgSched.shtml.

Check back regularly for schedule changes.  

Media registration: Form available at http://www.naicu.edu/meetings/2006MediaReg.htm, or by calling 202-739-0474.  

Please register by Friday, February 3.  Contact: Tony Pals, NAICU director of public information, tony@naicu.edu, office: 202-739-0474, cell: 202-288-9333

###

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                

CONTACT: Tony Pals, tony@naicu.edu                                                        

office: 202-739-0474     cell: 202-288-9333 

Media Advisory 

Senators Clinton and Santorum to Address 2006 NAICU Annual Meeting

Gathering of More than 400 Private College Leaders to Examine Emerging Trends and Key Issues in Higher Education  

WHAT: 2006 NAICU Annual Meeting “Transition and Tradition”

Private college and university presidents and other members of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities will meet with policymakers, leading higher education researchers and experts, and political pundits to address the future of higher education and challenges facing institutions and students today.   

WHERE:

Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill

400 New Jersey Avenue, NW Washington, D.C. 202-737-1234  

WHEN: February 5-8, 2006  
 

Issues include:

Spirituality on campus ● The Secretary of Education’s Commission on Higher Education ● Trends in the college selection process ● The international role of American colleges and universities ● Higher education tax policy ● Recruiting and marketing trends 

Speakers include:

Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) ● Sen. Rick Santorum (R-Pa.) ● Rep. Phil English (R-Pa.) ● New York Times Columnist David Brooks ● Newsweek Contributor Eleanor Clift ● Student Attitudes Researcher Alexander “Sandy” Astin ● Futurist Eric Peterson  

Schedule of events:

Available at http://www.naicu.edu/meetings/2006AnnMtgSched.shtml.

Check back regularly for schedule changes.  

Media registration: Form available at http://www.naicu.edu/meetings/2006MediaReg.htm, or by calling 202-739-0474.  

Please register by Friday, February 3.  Contact: Tony Pals, NAICU director of public information, tony@naicu.edu, office: 202-739-0474, cell: 202-288-9333

###

January 17, 2006

show article

read full article


X

Statement by NAICU President David L. Warren on the 2005 College Board Tuition and Student Aid Reports

Statement by NAICU President David L. Warren on the 2005 College Bo...

October 18, 2005

October 18, 2005

show article

read full article


Displaying results 91-95 (of 175)
 15 - 16 - 17 - 18 - 19 - 20 - 21 - 22 - 23 - 24 

About the items posted on the NAICU site: News items, features, and opinion pieces posted on this site from sources outside NAICU do not necessarily reflect the position of the association or its members. Rather, this content reflects the diversity of issues and views that are shaping American higher education.

Top